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Posts by birthinglau

I understand the tiredness. I did not have a posterior baby, but I did have a stop-start labor that was incredibly frustrating, though for me, going to sleep and ignoring it was what worked. That doesn't mean it is working for you right now though. Your contractions are going somewhere, just not down and out yet. I can think of a few things you could do, if not doing them already: ~pelvic tilts/rocking ~bellydancing (right up hip movements are especially...
you answered your own question seriously, it does sound like you are rotating the baby to me, in my experience of posterior labor support. though I wonder what the benefit would be to speeding it up if midwife is far away AND weather is not so great? -Lau
Glad to help with the explanation. Yes, CST can be utilized to address post epi pain. I agree with JanetF about the psychoemotional elements that can come with physical pain. It's also been my experience that CST can access unconsious memories in the reciever. -Lau
I wanted to add one thing I forgot: all connective tissue in the body is connected (naturally!) which means that the fascia surrounding all muscles and nerves all the way out into the more superficial skin layers, is part of a continous whole. this includes the dura mater and other meninges. I've learned that that is one reason that the experience of pain or discomfort may not always appear to make sense in a direct way, but somewhere, there is a root for it, oftentimes...
I've heard this too (and I've heard an OB on a call in medical show refute the possibility of this). My understanding of this that it is related to scarring, otherwise termed adhesions, of the dura mater of the spinal cord, or leaking of cerebrospinal fluid at the site of the epidural into the epidural space if it goes in too deep. I really began to understand this concept in massage school, when we applied the info to CST of the dural sheath to remove adhesions....
I went to a great workshop on Vaginal Ecology, taught by midwife (CNM) Sheri Winston. She addresses BV specifically, and has a recipe below that can be used in conjunction with pharmaceutical treatments. Vagina Vinagrette Cream (I know... her cheesy name, not mine) 1 tblsp plain organic yogurt with live cultures empty in 1 capsule of acidophilus add few drops lemon juice or vinegar add a few drops hydrogen peroxide Insert with an applicator (like the one from...
I'm a massage therapist who specialized in women's issues related to conception, pregnancy and postpartum. I've also studied as an apprentice with a midwife who practices from a perinatal psychology and somatic basis. I agree with Chiro Kristin, especially about the craniosacral therapy. Given your family history and your own trauma I think exploring those issues from the messages your body has to reveal could be extremely healing for you. I had an intuitive...
What if you had a client at the birth center who declined the initial VE, had a labor that was consistent with FTP, and you had made the call to transport. Could you then revisit the VE issue, offer the exam again and give informed consent on the risks (infection, etc) v/s the benefits (probably a smoother transistion to hospital for the family)? If the OB is most likely going to want a baseline VE upon arrival, I think having the option to have the trusted midwife...
I think it is really a sign of a caring sensitive CP that your patients are comfortable coming to you with these issues. What a gift you are giving them by honoring that trust. I attended some short workshops with this sex educator : www.sheriwinston.com Sheri is also a CNM, LMT and approaches sexuality from the standpoint of humour and reverence. She has a technical background, but focuses mostly on the non-medical aspects of sexual function. She is...
My ideal practice looks like this: I envision getting my CPM and ideally working with another more experienced midwife doing homebirths and possibly birthcenter births. I see continuing my massage practice, and getting some specific continuing education such as maya uterine massage training, and advanced craniosacral therapy. Attending 2-3 births per month is my ideal amount of client load. I'd also like to build in times for overseas volunteer birth work. -Lau
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