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Posts by Roar

Sorry to jump out of the conversation, an unexpected trip out of town means I'll be offline for a few days. Thanks to all for the thought provoking conversation. I've enjoyed it and I look forward to seeing where you are when I tune back in!
  Okay, we don't have to use the word damage. Let's say thrive less. Do you believe music lessons will make a child thrive less? Would that be the same or different as math lessons?   I still don't understand the point about the legal requirement. What does that have to do with the child's experience?
I'm wondering if there is much rhythm to your days. For some kids who aren't naturally self regulated, having a regular flow to the days can be helpful. If so maybe try working with her to make a routine chart to hang on the wall. It can include both together times and independent times as well as daily activities like taking a walk or cooking lunch. It doesn't necessarily have to be super detailed but it may be the process of working on it with you will help her better...
So, the idea then is that stuff like music and soccer is fun stuff kids want to learn. But, math is probably something kids do not, even kids who haven't experienced and don't really have any idea what it would be like?
I'm not sure I understand your point. Is the idea that a six year old wouldn't be damaged by music because it isn't legally required, but would be damaged by parent led math because math is legally required? I don't know kids who make that distinction, do you?
  I'm not going to spend hours pulling out the context for every post. No time. But, yeah, when people bring up definitions I responded to it, yeah, probably not productive. My belief remains that everyone here is here because they have found unschooling philosophy or unschooling in some way valuable for their families. (but, I'm pretty sure no two people define who is an unschooler and who isn't in exactly the same way, so yeah, not productive).   As far as practice for...
It is more of a personality thing and maturity thing as not all kids do it. But I don't at all question that some kids are capable of structured self directed activity from a young age. We saw self initiated multi day epic projects from age three or so. Keeping that alive was a major reason why we didn't opt for school. I don't think this activity is the same as working in conjunction with a parent on an academic subject in a structured way. It isn't better, worse, it is...
  Do they seem less interested in learning since you started this? Do they think their own self directed activities are less meaningful?    
Do you know many children who go to school or who homeschool? And, they all hold this negative distinction between learning and fun? And, as a result they are robbed of confidence?   That just really doesn't jive with kids I know. I've seen some very motivated, alive, excited to learn kids who go to school, and kids who homeschool, and kids who unschool. And, unfortunately I've seen kids who are pretty negative and turned off in all those three groups too. Perhaps in some...
I don't recall suggesting force, enforce, impose, sit at a table, grammar, etc. It is interesting this is what is heard just from the suggestion of anything that would involve parents and kids working together in a structured way, keeping an awareness of long term goals, keeping an eye on whether kids are developing core competencies (both academic and life skills). Parents being okay with saying "let's give this a try for fifteen minutes and we'll figure out what works...
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