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Posts by joensally

Is this your younger DD?  If so, where's older DD attending school?  
  I think there are multiple topics happening in this thread.  I'm not actually advocating for gifted programs as it's not a possibility in my jurisdiction and I'm pretty sure my kids would hate one.     I concluded a long time ago that gifted is just one part of a person who is gifted, moderated by and co-existing along with temperament, self-regulation etc etc.  Everyone's experience of a setting is going to be different, some people's needs are more complicated, and...
I have largely stopped participating in online forums on the topic of giftedness because it's frustrating, and because I'm less comfortable talking about my kids online.  This thread is frustrating.  We've got a bunch of people talking past each other, and about a variety of topics.   Sure, there are parents who live through their kids, hyper-focus on excellence and achievement, and that's in areas of academics, sports, the arts, whatever.  Sure, there are kids who...
  Um...they fell through the cracks after being identified/in spite of being identified?
You know what's really cool?  Some professionals have spent a lot of time studying and thinking about these sorts of things:   http://www.davidsongifted.org/db/browse_by_topic_articles.aspx   http://www.sengifted.org/resources/resource-library   http://hoagiesgifted.org/
Have you considered that perhaps your experience was generally positive because you were in the gifted program vs being bogged down by frustration by not having your needs met?  Where I am there are no gifted programs at all, but there are other ways to meet the needs of individual learners.  I also believe that the school system today if very different from that of the 80s and 90s and isn't directly comparable.           I agree with many of the sentiments in your post....
  No to the bolded.   Asperger's is typically diagnosed after 3, and many are diagnosed at school age.   Many kids who end up with an Asperger's diagnosis have a PDD-NOS diagnosis as it's suspected/believed they are on the spectrum, but are too young to be fully assessed against the range of PDD criteria.  Many kids who end up with an Asperger's diagnosis also go through a series of other diagnoses first, as previous posters have pointed out.    Early Intervention...
Coming back to say that I would approach this by establishing incremental goals.  For instance, between now and winter break, establish a schedule and support him in achieving and maintaining it.  So, get up in the morning and pay attention to how long things take him.   Together figure out how long he needs from getting out of bed to getting out of the house, then work back from there to a goal bedtime and wake up time.  Then for the next few weeks get up with him and...
That's great about his writing!     Re the bolded - most other 16 year olds have had years of getting up and getting out of the house.  We've homeschooled and regular schooled, and they each require different things.  And if he has executive function issues (ADHD), he's going to be slower to develop strategies to keep himself on task and on time, and will likely require more explicit coaching than a kid with typical executive function abilities.
My kid with vision issues did this for years.  Hours a day.  He now reads lots.  And he still does things intensely, too.  
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