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Posts by joensally

Why not phone these folks and ask for further information.  There may be more than one route to answers, and they may all be 6 months or longer, or maybe not:     This service provides:  * assessment and diagnosis of autism spectrum disorders * multidisciplinary team approach;  * liaison/consultation with schools/preschools/daycares, as needed;  * may include recommendations, counselling and referral to community services. Available...
    http://www.albertahealthservices.ca/services.asp?pid=saf&rid=1055169    
What province are you in?    Some provinces require more than a pediatrician alone to make a diagnosis, so to wait 6 months to go on another waitlist would be very troubling.   I don't think anyone online can give you an answer, and pursuing an evaluation would be worthwhile.   Have you read about Sensory Processing Disorder?
what test is he taking?
I didn't think Jen Muise was being unsupportive of Soul-O.  I think she was recommending further exploration to the child's benefit.   ADHD is a highly debated diagnostic category, based on it's frequent co-morbidity, and the fashion and frequency by which it is typically diagnosed.  If a psych diagnosed it without doing a psychoeducational assessment, it may very well have been diagnosed via subjective inventories, which are pretty weak tools to use to then...
I would seek evals and support for both kids :).  It's ok.  I have two complicated kids.  DS was pretty active and impulsive before 6, but settled down with age and sensory interventions.   Having professionals involved with one kid is exhausting, and with two is ridiculous.  But if it helps them thrive, and helps you survive, it's worth it.   And 4 year olds can be, ahem, challenging just by virtue of being 4.
You don't have to go somewhere else :).  There are a lot of posters in this forum with some pretty complicated kids.  And many of those kids are a bit older than yours, we've done some evals, we know what's going on better now, and have personally settled in emotionally with what the deal is.  I've felt the blind panic you're expressing, and actively grieved that my kid wasn't going to have a gentle, easygoing, typical early childhood experience.   At 6, consequences...
That's just a broad screening.  My son tested as a bit far sighted by the regular optometrist (so more detailed exam that what you're describing).  Took him to the developmental optometrist, and discovered that in fact he has a couple of complicating issues with his eyes.  We couldn't figure out why he could read (huge, non-phonetic words in isolation - not within a line of text), but would not read.  The particular issues he has also have behavioural manifestations...
who did the vision check?  this matters.
Don't know about that test, but as Tigerle's link indicates, group testing is not compatible for every kid.   In one of your threads you talk about whether to test.  My advice, based on navigating two complicated kids through a system that doesn't really get them, is test.  I've never regretted doing a test or assessment, as it's always yielded valuable information.   If you do decide to test, spend a lot of time looking for a tester.  There is a new test called...
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