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Posts by joensally

I think it sounds like you need to do some research.  If you think about it this way, a 2E (twice exceptional) kid is a statistical outlier at least twice over - related to IQ and learning difference(s).  This means that most people have not encountered a kid quite like this, and not with this particular blend of strengths and challenges.  So, teachers, peds, psychologists may have limited experience.   We have had a pretty bizarre experience navigating the system -...
Yeah, that may be style/temperament, or it could be that he has a slower processing speed, which isn't uncommon.
Have you looked at SPD?  Or not clinically SPD, but sensory issues?  Sensory issues can feed anxiety.   Even if your DS doesn't have SPD, there's lots of good strategies to address behaviour and anxiety in the SPD books.
You need to talk to his teacher so that school staff can help facilitate interactions.  It's very common in grade 1 that there's some social coaching and redirection.  Teacher needs to be alerted to the issues as it may be happening subtly and quietly so she's not aware.   You might also consider a social skills class and/or explicit social coaching.  There's a lot of good info about social skills, often categorized as for people with autism or social communication...
That's great that you've seen someone so experienced.  It's really hard, because when you've got a kid who's a double outlier, lots of clinicians just haven't seen it before.   All of these diagnoses share processing issues.  I have found books about ASD very helpful in terms of addressing processing issues for my son who does not have an ASD.   If you like research, you may love the Eides' book.  They deal with processing issues of every variety, and they make the...
This is a great post.  Geofizz, you do a great job of distilling all the information into usable stuff.
DS is 2E, so we've been through a lot of assessment processes.  It's exhausting.   It's more typical for gifted kids to have scatter, particularly low WM and PS, than it is to have consistency among scores.   PRI is pretty dependent on visual and fine motor skills, whereas VCI is pretty reliant on listening/responding.  I would look at auditory processing issues.  And it's always good to rule out vision issues via a developmental optometrist.   A psych doing...
PDD-NOS is an ASD.  It refers to Pervasive Developmental Disorders (of which Asperger's is one) - Not Otherwise Specified.  Different places employ different strategies, but in many places a PDD-NOS diagnosis will make a child eligible for services.  Many kids start out with a PDD-NOS diagnosis and later end up with an Asperger's or other PDD diagnosis.  It's very difficult to definitively diagnose a 4 year old because many diagnoses share behavioural manifestations, and...
Would a PDD-NOS diagnosis get you access to services?  It's commonly used to identify a child who is believed to be on the spectrum but it's not yet been determined where exactly on the spectrum.   In the last eval, did they use standardized assessment tools, including direct observation and interaction with your DD?  And do you understand which diagnostic labels get you which types and amounts of services in your jurisdiction?
Do you have access to the person who tested him to ask questions about the results?   Quick googling is not giving me the answer, but I think it's a difference of 23 points that indicates a "discrepancy LD."  What were his WM and PS scores like?   The Peabody is supposed to indicate specific LDs, and it's curious that the tester didn't use the WIAT which is normed to the WISC.  It sounds like you need more interpretation of the test results you already...
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