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Posts by Thalia the Muse

Interesting -- she taught herself to knit last fall (although she claims crochet is waaay too hard, which I think is crazy because clearly crochet is far easier than knitting to all right-thinking people, because it's easier for me ...) And we have some origami stuff, but she quickly gets frustrated if the instructions are unclear or the folds are too hard.
My DD is ten and in a fifth-grade GATE class. While she is not crazy-gifted in math and science the way some of her classmates are, she's good enough that she has no problem keeping up with the class math work and mastering new concepts. She says math isn't hard, but is kind of boring. A couple of years ago, she DID think math was hard and that she wasn't good at it, but I think this teacher and this program have done a better job with presenting concepts than the...
Another vote for the Carus magazines -- you really can't go wrong with them! Kiki is excellent but definitely more "tween focused," with lots of fashion coverage (not body-shaming/skanky/heavily consumerist like most fashion mags, but still more for older kids). American Girl would also be fine; it's not challenging reading, but unobjectionable (except they indirectly shill the dolls a bit) and full of tips for projects to do and how to get along with friends and so...
I think there are many educational aspects to Halloween -- education is more than math worksheets. It's a good opportunity to talk about seasons and harvest festivals and what other cultures do to celebrate harvest time and the ending of summer. It's a good time to read great picture books, some of which have the repetitive structure that helps kids prepare to read -- try Ten Timid Ghosts or The Haunted House That Jack Built. Making your own costume (or elements of it)...
She's EIGHT and she made those? They're fantastic!
I just learned how to crochet in the last month or so! I used a couple of books that had good detailed instructions and diagrams (Teach Yourself Visually: Crochet and Stitch n Bitch The Happy Hooker), but it sounds like that's not your preferred method. If the Youtube videos aren't helpful, then you can either find a local yarn shop that does lessons (you probably just need one: crochet is REALLY easy -- once you learn how to do a single crochet into your starting chain...
I'm a little late to the party, but do you want to sew (per your post) or cross-stitch (per your title)?   Cross-stitch suppliers:   123stitch.com (I order from them a lot and highly recomend -- great service!) herschners.com thesilverneedle.com -- lots of hard-to-find stuff ebay!     Jo-Ann and Michaels have phased out almost all of their cross-stitch supplies, although they both still carry needles and floss.
I think that most four-year-olds would know that they SHOULDN'T do that -- but an awful lot of them don't have enough impulse control to help themselves. I don't think that's beyond the range of normal four-year-old behavior at all (unless you're seeing other warning signs wtih him).
I think I'd stick to picture books for a while -- many of them are very gentle, and if the art is good enough they don't feel babyish at all. My daughter loved more sophisticated picture books well into elementary school. She's ten, and still sometimes like to get her old picture books out!   Gentle picture books with big-kid (and parent -- I love all of these) appeal:   Tuesday or Flotsam, David Weisner   The Madlenka books, Peter Sis   When the Sky Is...
This is an old thread, but I have some suggestions! I loved that stuff myself, so I read a LOT of scary books.   Books:   Jane-Emily, Patricia Clapp Down a Dark Hallway, Lois Duncan (this is not one of her teen slasher books, which I don't recomend for an 8-year-old) The House with a Clock in Its Walls, John Bellairs The Headless Cupid, Zilpha Keatley Snyder The Halloween Tree, Ray Bradbury The Witch Family, Eleanor Estes Ruth Chew wrote lots of books...
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