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Posts by birthgreeter

I would start now......
1 - What is the reason why some midwives would be hesitant to train someone that moved to the area to apprentice? I would not be hesitant if someone moved to the area. I would still judge by how committed they are. 2 - You are talking about how hard an apprenticeship is. Why? How is it different from your own practice? Is it only because the apprentice doesn't make the decisions, and has to 'blindly' follow? As the time goes on, the apprentice will begin to make...
I am not in your area, but I suggest that you join (if you have not) the state organization for midwives and begin to attend meetings. (there could be more than one state organization-check that out too) Attend the states conferences and if they have monthly guilds, attend them. The more you get to know the midwives out there, that will help open the doors for you.
Quote: Originally Posted by channelofpeace Why is there this assumption that the OP hasn't really thought this through? I do not think that she has not thought it through. But every apprentice I have ever taken on, has always said they have thought it through, they have child care ready, and their family is ready for this too- etc. But when it comes time for the commitment and to really be available, they are not ready like they thought...
I do not consider the webster tech to be invasive. I want my clients to go for this treatment if needed. OB's are not always 'naturally minded' . They are not trained in natural -just 'scientific' ways for the most part. You can try the 'iron board technique'. Which is placing a board with one end of the board on the couch and the other end on the floor. Be sure what ever you use is wide enough so you do not roll off. You lay with your head at the floor end...
"I've seen way too many midwives over the years put their families second and now are reaping the consequences. Teen pregnancy, drugs, terrible relationships, kids moving far away, school problems. I think these things aren't spoken about much, but they are a very real problem." " Anytime I take a new apprentice, it takes away from my family and is lots of work. So I feel I have a right to have certain criteria in place to protect myself, my clients, and most...
when you dry stuff, you need to store it is a cool dark place- I dry my herbs in a (closet) with no window. I pick stuff in the morning, not during the heat of the day. I have a huge shelf for storage after they are dry, that has a about 4 shelves of jars filled with dry herbs. You can make a index card to tape onto the front of the jar that lists the herb in there, what part of the plant it is from (leaves, flowers, root etc)-how to use it-topical, teas, tinctures and...
Some types of potatoes keep better than others, so If you have more than one type planted, keep them separated when you store them. That way if you find one type is not keeping as well, you can use them up first...makes things easier. I need a cold room like you described CarrieMF
got this info from a site about walnuts... "Allelopathy involves a plant's secretion of biochemical materials into the environment to inhibit germination or growth of surrounding vegetation." here are a few plants that you can grow near walnut trees: * Flowering dogwood * Canadian hemlock * Hickory trees * Lilac trees * Privet (invasive) * Forsythia * Sumac shrubs * Sweetgum trees * Shasta daisy * Hosta * Lamb's...
Quote: Originally Posted by triscuitsmom OK... 3 minutes after he was out (I have my records, it really was only 3 minutes) it was decided my placenta was taking too long and the resident pulled on the cord to get it to come out (not gentle traction, but actual pulling, 99.9% sure -that was the cause of PPH . Rule: leave the placenta alone and leave your uterus alone. Work with bonding with your baby, nursing etc. the placenta should come...
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