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Posts by 3girlmom

We have refused EI services for private ones, but when they came to meet with us they gave us a thick folder of paperwork that says about 2000 times that you can refuse services at any point. Refusal of services alone isn't grounds for a call to CPS, especially if it's documented that services continue privately. Just send a thorough letter, and frankly, I'd list the many ways in which EI has made your life more difficult, and send copies of that to your state...
Please do report back. There's a location 5 minutes from my house, but I didn't take DD there. I asked her OT about it and he didn't say anything bad about it, but he did say he didn't know much about it, which is odd, as he's, you know, big on the SN thing. Anyway, I'd really appreciate it if you posted in detail about your experience there.
Mothering's print magazine had a great article on chess a few years ago - I found it very inspirational. I started, as the article suggested, with a game called pawns, basically teaching DD how the pawns work. Then I sent her to chess camp (www.chesscamp.com) and she came home the first day and played an entire game of chess with me. She was 5. Anyway, I'd search the archive for the chess article, and I totally recommend chess camp, especially for girls.
I just wanted to say, momma, that you seem to be doing a great job so far, even with the shock and disappointment of the diagnosis. You've already found curejm, the organization that will help you navigate the medical stuff, and you can come here for a lot of other things. I think that processing a diagnosis for your child is a lot like the five stages of grief, often all in one day! I'm sure this is a hard time for you and your family, and I hope you will reach out to...
DD had ASD, with a "major" in oral hypersensitivity, and wouldn't eat solids until about 14 months - it sounds quite similar to your situation and was just awful. Feeding therapy was what made the difference. I wasn't told not to nurse her, but to try to offer her other foods and liquids first, as part of what were like 10 different things I had to do (every two hours!) to get her to overcome her oral aversion. It worked, and now she eats very well, but she's had some...
I don't know if UUMom's remarks are directed at me or at the OP (or both!) but I just want to clarify that I don't feel inferior, I just don't feel like having an extensive conversation with everyone about why I'm HSing, what we're doing, how long we'll go - I think people who would never dream of questioning decisions to send a kid to school somehow feel like with HSing it's a free-for-all to question my parenting. And they're trying to figure out how to place me, and I...
We were in an almost identical situation when we started to homeschool last fall after pulling our LO out of the Montessori school she had been attending. The hardest part for me has been that "fitting in" piece of it. I find that it is EVERYONE's first question. At book club, "So, how's the homeschooling going?" At ballet, "So, you're homeschooling, right?" At the farmer's market, "So, are you going to hs next year?" And behind that question is a lot of judgement. ...
I've had a couple of my friends complain about this with their kids, and depending on the school, sometimes the teachers push it and sometimes they don't. I would leave it alone until your DC goes 5 days a week, personally. I homeschool my CH graduate (she did Montessori through kindgergarten) and, like you, I struggle with how to make math as exciting as history or reading or whatever. We love a program called "Knights of Knowledge"...
I remember when I had a child in the toddler room, there was only one or maybe two paint colors available. But there were always a couple of different colors of crayons. In the current CH room my Lo attends, I think there are two or three paint colors available, and then a full palette of watercolors. I think the paint thing was a matter of controlling mess and preventing gray/brown paintings in the toddler room. My understanding is that Waldorf does a pretty...
I'm posting without reading the other posts so I don't chicken out, because I do exactly what you want to be doing. I have a nanny for my SN LO (18 months) in the mornings, when I do the bulk of homeschooling my oldest. I love her, but I cannot be responsible for her full-time. I need the break from her in order to keep my sanity, so that I can meet her needs the rest of the day (and evening - DH is gone 3 nights a week). Every child needs different things. I also...
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