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Posts by 3girlmom

Smokering, that is exactly how/why I learned to cook. I would have starved to death otherwise. We ate McDonalds and Dominos during the week, and went to restaurants on the weekends. So cooking from scratch in my own kitchen and not having to go out still seems like the height of luxury, even in my 30s.
In our circumstances, the speech pathologist who evaluated our DD for a second opinion said that the speech delay made sense because she'd had the extensive oral hypersensitivity that gave her eating problems. This is clearly not the case in others' experiences. But for me, it was helpful to realize that her speech delay was linked to the eating delay. Maybe others don't see this correlation, but for me, once the SP pointed it out, it was a very helpful frame for DD's...
I recommend Nigella Lawson's Lunchbox treats in her Nigella Express cookbook. You melt some butter and chocolate with some malted syrup and dump it on some mixed cereals. The kids feel like they're cooking, but you feel like you're mixing. And also, they mostly appeal to kids rather than adults, so I'm not going to pig out on them. Other things that are not-quite cooking - paninis, salads, salsa, guacamole. Really, really simple muffins and cookie dough. Pancakes. ...
We had a very similar situation with our LO, who was diagnosed at 9 months. The therapists will probably start you on the The Wilbarger Deep Pressure and Proprioceptive Technique (DPPT) with the oral component at the end. The sooner your OT starts you on this, the better, probably (I know some people on this board don't like it or find it helpful, but we did it religiously and feel it was very successful). I bought a bunch of sensory toys (unfortunately they're all...
I don't know how to explain it in other births...it's just my working theory on my LO. She also had torticollis, actually. We did (and do) a ton of cranial sacral work and chiropractic work, and she wouldn't let either practitioner anywhere near that area. She also has Turner's Syndrome, which is associated with an increased risk of SPD, although no one has been able to explain to me why.
My working theory is birth trauma. My LO's first sensation of touch was being yanked out of the womb (the cord had gotten pinched and her heartrate had gone way, way down, so the midwife manually dialated me and pulled her out) before she was ready, and she didn't get to do all the work of squeezing herself through the birth canal. She had significant oral hypersensitivity, which I think is from the vagus nerve getting pinched during that process.
Thanks, ladies. I'm actually pretty worried about tonight, because I move from her thigh to her arm (we have to change the location every day). She is in the <3 percentile for weight, and has so little meat on her bones. It's pretty simple, but still...I'm injecting my baby! I know it could be far, far worse, but it's still been an adjustment for me. And I don't think I've ever done *anything* every day for 14 years.
Yesterday we started growth hormone shots for my daughter who has Turner Syndrome. A nurse came and showed me how to administer the shots. I did it successfully with her watching, but tonight was the real test (and my husband's on a business trip this week). I did it. Smoothly. She only cried for a second, and then it was over. Who-hoo. 2 nights down, 13 years, 363 days to go....
I don't know if this is helpful, but we had some issues with my daughter with SID (also a *very* early walker), because she was trying to avoid the sensory information so she held her feet a certain way while she walked. Also, because she was really walking too early - crawling provided too much sensory information, so she was really eager to walk rather than crawl - the mechanics of the thing weren't quite there. Maybe it's a combination of perceiving too much sensory...
Any chance you could write a little refresher post on Montessori potty-training? It would be great to have someone who has Montessori training do that....
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