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Posts by chicagomom

Welcome to the world of knitting! I think you're right to trust your instincts. Get some 7s or 8s, and make a couple of scarves. Start with a garter-stitch scarf or dishcloth (knit every row), then if you want to get "fancy", go for something like BrooklynTweed's ribbed scarf, which is immensely gratifying because you're alternating self-striping yarn and it's easy to do and comes out beautiful. To do his scarf, get 2 skeins of self-striping worsted-ish weight yarn...
Here's an easy nightgown. Buy an inexpensive tshirt that fits her (long sleeves, short, or sleeveless), and measure it around. Multiply the inches around x 1.5 (2 if you want a full skirt) and buy that amount of matching/complimentary cotton fabric. figure out where you want the seam to be on the shirt, gather the fabric and sew it onto the tshirt. One more seam to close the circle. Voila, nightgown! Also makes a nice playdress.
The party host is expected to pay for invited guests. Parents, additional kids, etc expect to pay their own way. As for whether you should say something, that depends on the closeness of your relationship. If you are close and think this person will trust that your remark is not meant in a catty way, you might mention that you were not expecting to pay because it was not mentioned on the invitation, and it was a surprise because it's unusual for a person to invite...
That's what we do. So yes, it's ok with us. They aren't going to be small forever. They really, really will want their own space later. The Neufeldian "Hang On To Your Kids" thing rings so true here; you are nurturing connection at night. As long as it's not creating resentments in your marital life I would go with the flow.
As with mothering, I've learned a whole lot about knitting well from just hanging out with other knitters while they knit. The internet is a great source of videos (youtube and knitting help) and articles, and I've come to these many times. Magazines like Interweave Knits have complex patterns, but they also have great articles on how to do stuff. As for yarn, I think it's a mistake to knit with yarn you do not like. Honestly with the internet and sales, one can find...
And of course, you need to knit him a uterus.
We bought a Wike two seater bike trailer, for which you can also buy a stroller wheel attachment to turn it into a jogging stroller. The thing is simply awesome, and I would highly recommend it to anyone. Folds and assembles easily, is built very well. At six and three, our two could still ride in it together comfortably. We purchased it when our eldest was five, and he is very tall; we chose it because it has the best leg room of any, and high safety ratings. At six,...
5 or 6, generally speaking. Every kid is different.
Quote: Originally Posted by sledg When I can listen to myself, hear my own needs, I can then request that those needs be met or do something to ensure they are met. When I'm aware of my own needs and feelings, then I am more free to listen to my children's needs and to respond to my children more gently. I appreciated your post, sledg. OTOH, I had a pretty bad parenting day yesterday, and I was aware of my needs, was expressing them, and it...
What's interesting to me is how the writer took this study, which was about increased *activity levels* in unsupervised kids in particular *environments*, and turned it into a diatribe against parents and government-sponsored activity programs, as though this was somehow the parents' or the governments' fault. This study appeared in an environmental design journal, Built Environment. It's purpose was to reinforce the idea that we need better spaces for kids to play,...
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