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Posts by captain optimism

I know, it's not right for them to make it your job to make them do their job. I'm sorry. This whole getting divorced thing sucks. I hope you are getting lots of support from people in your life. 
Call every day and email the office. This is not acceptable. You paid for the document to be written and they haven't given you the document. What happens if your husband and his lawyer want to make changes? You can't have this person represent you or advise you on those negotiations if he won't return phone calls.    You need to be tough and persistent to deal with all this bureaucratic crap. If you aren't naturally tough and persistent, just pretend really...
I love the way Moominmamma put this. Hothousing does come from privileging high-status knowledge over the set of all possible things that could interest a child.    I wouldn't want parents to feel like they couldn't share their own passions and hobbies with their kids, though. It's OK to be parent-directed about wanting your kid to love the same stuff you do, even if that stuff is Russian literature or theoretical physics. Sharing what you love is a way to show...
I don't think this is something you need to care about. If you enjoy teaching your child something and he enjoys learning it, that's play. If he doesn't think what you're doing is play, well, he's a toddler and he'll tell you no. Even if you make him memorize Latin declensions at age 2, or something crazy like that, I think it's fine if he is sincerely into it. 
When he was a toddler, the age of your child, he used to practice things. That wasn't anything to make anyone think he was gifted, it was just... his temperament. I remember him imitating the radio when he was trying to learn to speak, saying harder words to himself.  Kids around that age sometimes develop little obsessions, like with dinosaurs or cars. My kid liked penguins and he learned everything he could about them.    As he became more verbal, he began...
  You actually have to say something to him about the bedtime. Something like, "Do not turn the lights on when you go to kiss the kids goodnight." Do not try clever non-verbal signals, handkerchiefs, colored flags, fans, and so forth.    I get why he wants to wake them up again, to have fun with them and have time with them. That doesn't make it OK for him to stop them from sleeping. You might have an argument on your hands when you first say something, but if you can get...
Oh, no, I was advocating openness, not passive-aggressive behavior. It's not passive-aggressive to say "I'm doing the bedtimes for six weeks." Passive aggressive would be to do them without saying anything, or to complain about how he does them without confronting him.    I think she should stick up for herself here. I am never in favor of sneaking around.   She asked "should I rule with an iron fist?" I think yes. Yes! That is my answer. If she has to raise her voice, so...
  Yes. He's already acting like you are. Do it. Don't let him be involved in bedtime for six weeks. (Just to get new habits started--not forever.) If you take over and get them to sleep earlier, he will see that you are right.    I don't know what to say about the video games. My first thought was that you should sell the big one and lock the little ones in a drawer somewhere--maybe in the back of the car, so you can have them for trips? But that requires really facing...
  I think this is right.   It is sometimes helpful to us to have labels to slap on behavior, labels like, "depressive" or "abusive" or "narcissistic" or "alcoholic." We like to have explanations when our partners start acting weird--a disease, an injury, a missing vitamin, or even a mental illness.    But you know, without any labels, this behavior you've described is unacceptable.      It sounds like the only reason you have not confronted him and insisted on different...
Opinions! Yes, I have some.    1. I do not agree that any time a professional assesses a child for a problem they find a problem and prescribe drugs for it. Also, you know what? If you have the child assessed and the assessor finds a problem and gives you a name for it, you still don't have to decide to administer drugs. There are books and websites full of advice about non-drug alternatives.    It might seem like most assessments find something wrong because...
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