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Posts by mumkimum

While he really may come across as creepy - I recognize some of this behavior as stuff my 7 y/o does with her younger (3 y/o) sister.  And it makes me think that it might be more of a developmental thing rather than that he's 'just a mean/creepy kid'.  I mean, if he doesn't have younger siblings - why wouldn't he sometimes behave this way with younger friends and neighbors where it safer to test some limits?  He's testing 7 y/o limits and trying things out that are...
OP, you've gotten lots of info and are probably looking around here (in actual Ohio) by now, but since noone had mentioned Lillian Ratner - it's a nice Montessori school that does have more of the higher grades in Beechwood (really close to the heights as well) and is, at least, a tad less expensive than Ruffing.  It has a Jewish-curriculum track for some as well as a secular/peace-related track of classes you can opt for instead.  We'd toured it and have known kids...
It's our 3rd or 4th year with the same CSA.  I'll admit, I simply love being able to take my kids there to walk the grounds and visit with the farmer & ladies who sell bread/jam there every week -- I think that's my big draw.   Aside from that, we've gotten used to the kinds of veg. we get AND they've varied it over the past few years so it is easier to use up and you're getting ingredients that go better together as well (like a bulk of tomatillos one week instead...
This is (basically) the pomegranate jelly I've made.  I've also done it without the lemon juice (though I like it better with).  I made a great one last holiday season with a quality pomegranate-sour cherry juice I'd picked up cheap.  It's easy, good, and versatile.
I've liked the basic info from pick-your-own for canning as well as the other previously mentioned resources (I love food in jars!).  I have a CSA share, so will sometimes can abundant stuff I've gotten through that.  Otherwise I also usually get cheaper seconds or buy extra when something is way cheap.     I've found it helpful (as a newbie canner too) to have some recipes I can can during 'off season' - like pomegranate jelly (using bottled juice) or a really good...
My youth-camp memory of 'healthier' or 'more-from-scratch' camping meals:     tacos or taco salad (cook up ground beef with seasonings and maybe re-heated beans, everything else just needs chopping so everyone chips in with that)   eggs, cooked in a hollowed-out orange with bacon laid in it (this is wrapped in foil and cooked in the coals of the fire)   grilled cheese (done in cast iron on the fire or wrapped in foil - foil seems pretty intergral with...
Man.  I hear you, I remember the one year I thought I had a whole week left until school was out (but I was wrong - and had just mis-labeled my calendar ).       We started out with a mini-vacation this year right after school let out, so I think it wasn't so bad right away.  BUT I found it was helpful using some indulgences to break into the summer - think ice cream outings or big home-cooked pancake breakfast with the looong days together at home.   And about...
Short ideas here:   I once read that people generally have one of the following spots of their home stay in (moderate) organization: bathroom, garden, or kitchen.  I find that helps quite a bit.  I focus on the bathroom when things are way out of control elsewhere because it's manageable, and I've made it easier over the years for myself.  Finding at minimum one spot in the house to start with and do that with can help immensely.   As for dealing with...
Two favorite crafty places of mine are the purl bee and the crafty crow. The purl bee has lots of projects, though fewer basic beginner types, but what I do find among it is very good - there's a really nice homemade pincushion for example. The crafty crow features lots of kid-made projects and categorizes them, and I've found some great sewing projects there for my dd too. As for doll-like clothes, I'd browse Pinterest. There are a lot of folks with boards just for...
Your bugs sound like what I find (which I've found out to be carpet beetles).  The tiny black bugs are young adults - they actually do not eat your wool and are not a major problem, save for any eggs they might lay (I honestly kill any I find, to cut down on their number in my home)  Their larvae are the reddish-brown ones you see, and that's what will eat your wool.  Sometimes they're colored slightly differently.  Moth larvae - the ones that will eat wool - are usually...
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