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Posts by heartmama

You might get more responses if you link to this thread in the unschooling forum; however I will leave this here too since it is a discipline related question.
    This is what I thought. If she thrives in the school environment I'd consider ways to bring more structure into the home. I can think of several explosive children like this (some posted about here) who did 100% better at home once a strict and consistent discipline plan was in place. Sunmama has posted extensively about this if you want to search her posts (which also involved help from a counselor).
mom2happy, in the interest of full disclosure, that is exactly what I did when ds threw a royal shoe throwing fit in his carseat at age 4. I pulled over at a gas station and slid open the car door and then I walked away and left him there (within sight of me) while I calmed down on a curb. I think I might have put him on the curb with me once I calmed down, I can't remember, it was so long ago. And when I say I calmed down he knew I was furious with him, literally in a...
I think anger can be effective if it works and counterproductive if it doesn't--how is that for mixed advice? :) A child over the age of 3 doing something really dangerous might learn a permanent valuable lesson by witnessing an outburst of parental shock and anger. The natural consequence of scaring the crud out of a driver is that the driver gets scared and upset. In this example your reaction (that parental shock/anger) is information. Perhaps a child needed that...
Since she never does it at school my guess is that she did try it there on a few occasions and figured out quickly the consequences were severe, which helped her regulate her behavior in that environment. At home the consequences are not severe enough to suppress the impulse to indulge in the behavior and because that impulse is so very strong she gives in to it, knowing it is wrong, which makes her feel guilty/regretful. Clearly it is not easy for her to regulate this,...
Unlike dogs and cats, rabbits are prey animals. It can be difficult to assess temperament the first time you meet. You can rule out a biter, that is true. If the rabbit is curious and approaches you that is a good sign. However if the rabbit is withdrawn and shy that could simply be due to your status as a predator. The majority of rabbits will be very cautious in new situations or with new people, even to the point of panic and extreme distress. This is all normal,...
We have two sweet indoor cats (spayed sisters) that are middle aged, probably 8 years old (rescued as adults from a shelter 5 years ago so it is hard to be sure). For the most part they are pretty easy. One of them tends to be more high strung at times but is mostly laid back. Except not recently! About a week ago I left the window opened slightly by my bed and the high-strung cat managed to wriggle out. I immediately went outside and brought her back in but that seems to...
Many 3 year olds have poor impulse control. They only 'know' the rules in the sense they can repeat them back to you and remember the words. They don't 'know' the rules in the sense that they comprehend the what or why of a situation and are capable of making a choice in their behavior. Some children can make choices at three but many cannot. Children are more consistent in choice-making by age 4 and especially by age 5. I heard an interesting fact in relation to a...
fixed
Wow. The original behavior sounds so extreme and beyond normal I don't think this is a question of toughening up your son's response. That is really awful what happened to him and I think he needs to hear that more than anything. I would worry about his feelings towards synagogue after taking a beating in the bathroom . I would want to meet with someone from there to apologize to him and assure him he is safe at synagogue. He should hear/see adults tell him that is not...
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