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Posts by Momily

We had season passes to six flags for a few years.   I get super motion sick so I was pretty motivated to have my kid ride without me.   From about 7, I would let my kid ride a ride with a friend and without me, but I'd walk the whole line with them, watch them get on and then take the chicken exit.  This was mostly the kind of rides where you see the whole thing, because the roller coasters have height restrictions.  Younger than that I would have done a kiddie...
I'm a big believer in gentle discipline, but I think if you want results you need to start early.  To be clear, I'm not talking about beating your baby, but giving them little cues that let them know your expectations and nudge them in the direction you want them to go.    For example, if your baby is swatting at you, you might get quiet and look away, letting him know gently but clearly that this isn't how you get attention, then reengage with a smile and a giggle...
I never said it did, I said avoiding my kid saying No wasn't a goal for me.    Saying to your child "No, don't stick your finger in the outlet, come play with your teddy bear instead", also doesn't create little control freaks.  If it's the reason why my 3 year old sometimes said "No mommy, I don't want carrots with my sandwich", that's OK. 
Just to clarify the Anglican churches, including the Episcopal church which is American version, are as Protestant as any other denomination.    In the DC area, Christian Family Montessori, and Woods Academy are two Catholic Montessori programs.  I don't happen to know of any Waldorf schools around here that are Christian.
  Hmmm, you know I'm not sure I consider it "lucky" to have a kid who doesn't experiment wtih finding their voice in this way.  "No" phases aren't the end of the world or something to seek out or avoid.  Just like I felt comfortable letting my baby know what I want, I feel comfortable with him letting me know the same.    I'm actually a pretty consensual parent, so letting my kid know when something didn't feel right to me, or fit with my values (like staying alive and...
You aren't overreacting.  He either never sees your son again, or if that's really impossible, he never sees him without you right there. 
  As far as your first point, I think that hoping your toddler won't describe the power of "no" is pretty optimistic.  I think that part of learning language is learning the words have power and that it's fun to exert that power.  I think most kids will go through a "no" phase even if you never use that word.   As far as your second point, yes I agree.  I do think that it's important to manage expectations so that you don't get angry when a kid doesn't get something until...
I think there are some really scary people out there who believe that babies are inherently sinful and need to be "punished", or that all kids are trying to grab control and you need to show them whose boss.  I don't want to deny that.   But for me, discipline means teaching and if my discipline is gentle and respectful, I don't see why I can't use it on a baby?  Did I yell at him?  Never, but that doesn't mean that I didn't say laughingly "Ow, that hurts, don't do...
  I'm one of the posters who suggested putting the kids in school as one possible solution.  Although I'm a teacher and a parent of a schooled child, I'm actually also a big believer in homeschooling.  I don't have a bias against homeschooling.  I do however have a bias towards being flexible, and finding solutions that work for a family, rather than adhering to one specific ideology.  I'd love to homeschool my child, I think he'd thrive, I think I'd find it incredibly...
While I agree 100% that the things people are suggesting are sorely needed, I think the thing that is most desperately needed in so many communities is services for adults with disabilities, particularly intellectual disabilities, once they age out of the school system. 
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