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Posts by Good Enough Mum

 At the moment, it seems to be a choice between 1. in-laws are distressed by their grandson being left to cry very briefly, and 2. OP has to spend huge amounts of her time trying to settle son without crying, and he faces potentially a lot more distress further down the line when the in-laws have left, he's forgotten how to get off to sleep without someone there for ages to settle him down, and has the extra difficulty of that to compound his transition to having a baby in...
Oh, BTW, I also meant to ask - what does FTM stand for?
Interesting question. Obviously varies hugely from baby to baby, but for most babies seems to be somewhere between six weeks and four months - as in, plenty of babies stop night feeding at that age and still grow perfectly well.   However, one problem to be aware of is that it's not certain how that impacts on overall milk supply in a breastfeeding mother. Anecdotally, it seems some women will drop their supply if they try to go for a period of several hours without...
Originally Posted by research babe  Maybe I missed something, but I haven't seen anything to indicate that the OP is being anything other than gracious and kind in her dealings with the in-laws. What she's doing is setting boundaries, and very appropriate ones based on all she's said. It's a very common mistake to believe that there's something unkind about disagreeing with someone or refusing to do things their way, and it's far too common in our culture for people...
You're not being snarky at all - excellent questions and well worth asking!   I do want to stress, for starters, that I'm not speaking as any sort of Official Nominated Representative For Disability Rights, or anything. This is my personal opinion on the subject - I do think it's one that a lot of people would share, but I'm not claiming to speak for others besides myself. But 'defect' is a very negative word, and also sounds to me more like a word people would use to...
 Absolutely - sorry, wasn't meaning at all to imply that any of the examinations should have happened without her consent or involvement. What I was getting at there was that one or two of the posters seemed to think that the multiple examinations were due to trainees being brought in for training, and I was putting forward what I think to be a much more likely scenario. (I say this partly because I think it's unlikely in any case that the 'get multiple trainees to queue...
First off, could people please not use the word 'defect' to mean 'disability'? I recognise that no harm was meant, but it's still a very unpleasant, negative way of talking about disability, and pretty inappropriate.   With regards to your dilemma - What things do you think you'd find difficult about having a child with a disability? How would you be placed to meet the challenges, in terms of financial resources, support, available time?   I see from your other posts...
Spinach and other green leafy vegetables are good. Red meat is a rich source of iron - obviously not the most recommended food in adults in other ways, but that's really not the same kind of issue in children and so this could be really useful if your child will eat red meat.   Also, note that calcium will block iron absorption, so if you're giving your iron-rich foods at the same time as milk, milk products, or other high-calcium foods, then he won't get the full...
 No. It would be sharing the raising of your kids with someone else. And you know what? That's a GOOD thing. This idea that childrearing should be exclusively and intensively the mother's work for 16 years is an anomaly in human history. For most of human history, the norm has been for children to be brought up in a group where there would be multi-age groups of children for them to play within, and multiple adults around to share in the caregiving. Why are we assuming...
Callahansmama - looking back at the time when my children were that small, I think that I just didn't realise how utterly, chronically tired I was. It was the kind of insidious tiredness you get when you're running short of sleep over a very long period of time, which starts to feel like normality because you can't remember what it was like not to feel that way. I wasn't (mostly) actually falling asleep at my desk, so I underestimated the extent to which it affected me -...
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