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Posts by Googy

I'm a homeschooler but not an unschooler, but recommend that you check out Relaxed Homeschoolers of NH (a great number of that group are unschoolers or have unschooling tendencies) as well as http://www.examiner.com/unschooling-in-manchester/susan-m-burke and https://www.facebook.com/pages/Manchester-NH-Unschooling-Examiner/103010219744974#!/groups/115948735150483/
I used to answer this question somewhat evasively, but I stopped doing so.  Most of the time this question was asked in front of my 7yo DD, and I realized that if I didn't address that question directly it was somehow implying to her that I was "ashamed" of homeschooling in some way.  So now when someone asks why we are homeschooling I say something like, "DD is just so bright and creative, I love being able to tailor her education to her interests and abilities!" ...
DD really liked what we did this year, so I think we are going to stick with it:   Moving Beyond the Page 7-9 RightStart Math C Explode the Code Online for phonics review   plus ASL classes, violin, CCD
I've been using the 6-8 and I love it.  I looked at the 5-7 and agree that it wasn't as impressive (I think they are reworking it for the next school year, actually).  But I really like the 6-8.  More importantly, my daughter loves it.  It is *interesting* and *motivating* instead of just a bunch of boring, innane worksheets.  My daughter has learned about comparative cultural literature, animal habitats and food chains, things she *wants* to learn about, so much so that...
I would start some handwriting with him, but in a really, really relaxed, fun manner.  Like pick a letter each week and have him practice tracing sandpaper letters, writing the letter in sand and/or shaving cream, make the letter out of his lunch foods, etc.  Then if he wants to write the letter on paper then great, if not, fine, wait until he's older.  If he wants to write on paper, start really big then slowly work your way toward smaller letters.  You can take...
I really think to *truly* learn a language in a authentically fluent way, kids need to learn from a teacher who is a fluent-speaking teacher, a real person right there with whom they can interact (there is actually a lot of research on this).  Its especially tricky if you want to learn real ASL word order, as opposed to signed English word order.   I just managed to find a woman in town who is an ASL translator.  I found her through the local preschools and school...
Yes.  This.  
I put the classics into the rotation, but they are by no means my focus educationally.  I think they should be read because there is quite a bit of cultural literacy surrounding them.  However, I am frankly somewhat horrified by the lessons taught by many of them.    For instance, I read my dd Jack and the Beanstalk the other day (it was part of her Moving Beyond the Page curriculum). For those of you who haven't read the full original version recently, Jack...
We're big RightStart fans here.  It requires one-on-one time, will not work for you if you need your child to work almost completely independedntly.  But the lessons are brief, they maybe take 15 minutes or so, and then usually end in some kind of game.  Even the lessons are active and physical.  I really like the philosophy that it is based on, it really makes math concepts easy to understand and work with.  I can't believe how ar my DD has come with RS this year!!!!
Aimee, he sounds very much on track to me.  Keep in mind that many 5 year olds enter kindergarten still not knowing their letters and sounds.  I completely understand, with T's history, you wanting to make sure that's he's where he needs to be.  I know its frustrating, but there really is a HUGE developmental spread of "normal" at this age. 
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