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Posts by ProtoLawyer

That the dancers/backing singers at the Pet Shop Boys concert last night were probably not even born when "West End Girls" came out.
What if he remarries? What about your stepfather, if your mom dies? (It's kind of weird saying "this is my stepfather and his wife.") We're having a bit of a family leave debate here--I couldn't (quickly) find a law defining "uncle," and the dictionary just says "a parent's brother" or "your aunt's husband." "Stepparent" does get defined in some places in Wisconsin law to ONLY refer to a spouse of a deceased parent (in a statute concerning a stepparent's right to...
Quote: Originally Posted by Drummer's Wife I'm not even sure what I did w/o it! Call someone else who had access to the internet? 411? sheesh. that seems way too time consuming 1-800-GOOG-411 will get you free directory assistance for commercial listings, and will connect you for free.
I don't see a problem with mom-like titles evolving organically, from the child...OR a stepparent (married or unmarried equivalent) disliking being called by a first name by a small child and seeking a more appropriate nickname...but no, a stepmom shouldn't be encouraging "mom" or "mommy" (absent unusual circumstances--completely uninvolved or deceased mom, heading toward adoption, or actual consent of mom...and even then the "encouragement" should be gentle and not...
Yep. Just come in through the back door (tile floor, right near a bathroom) rather than the front door (hardwood).
(Standard "this isn't legal advice" disclaimer.) In some states, those waivers are meaningless. It's against public policy to sign away your kid's right to sue. You can sign away your own right to sue (for the most part), but not a child's. (So why have the waiver? Part of that is to inform parents that there is an inherent risk in an activity...and part of that is to deter lawsuits anyway. Many people assume that if they signed a waiver, that's the end of it and they...
Sunflowers--I can surely understand a feeling of ookiness at the eye thing, and following up, but I'm sure if you were following up you'd do so without immediately accusing your co-parent of neglect and fostering sexual abuse. I mean, SD's mom went from "I need to talk to you" right to "your supervision is harming our daughter." I did find out later that SD's mom was under the impression that SD's friend was a teenager--because that's what SD told her mom. So I do...
A GAL can technically recommend whatever he/she wants; it's the judge who decides and makes the orders. I don't think a judge would order a child to miss school for visitation, barring truly unusual circumstances. (Parent in the military on a 2-week leave from a multi-year deployment, perhaps?) Maybe the GAL would recommend or the judge would order visitation occur where you are, so that your son doesn't miss school? That would make more sense (although it would...
Quote: Originally Posted by SuzyLee Could you ask her about doing some kind of family counseling all together to come up with a coparenting plan that meets her needs as well as alowing your SD to have the normal freedoms of a 7 year old? Would she be open to something like that? Other than that, I am not sure what to suggest. It seems unlikely that you simply trying to reassure her will really make much difference. That may be a thought....
No kids with my ex, but I went back to my maiden name. My SD's mother (my partner's ex) has changed her last name a few times (long story), and with the divorce, she took a previous, non-maiden name. SD has my partner's last name; it hasn't caused any issues. I will be retaining my maiden name when I remarry. Any kids we have together will get his last name, which is fine.
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