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Posts by psychmama

s Another way to at least get started (if you have a trusting relationship with your primary care physician or OB) would be to ask if he/she has a list of therapists that he/she refers patients to. Most physicians do, since many people start getting help after mentioning depression or anxiety during a medical appointment.
Honestly, I would switch him. You can continue to fight battle after battle with the current daycare, but if things keep coming up, clearly there's something off with the whole place. I agonized about switching my daughter from a center where she'd been happy for two years when this year she had a teacher who was really negative and unenthusiastic (along with an increase in class size and some very aggressive behavior from classmates). When I visited the new place, I was...
I definitely felt that way at several points in grad school even before I had my daughter. I agree with the advice to take it one day at a time. Also, is there any way you can do one semester on a part-time basis? I did that the semester after I had my daughter, and it really helped me keep a balance.
Just wanted to add reassurance as someone who has worked with numerous OCD patients that intrusive thoughts mean nothing about who you are as a person. Think of them as "brain hiccups" that everyone has to some extent. Except that for someone with OCD or PP-OCD, intrusive thoughts persist because of the anxiety associated with them (the more that you try to avoid the thoughts or worry about having more of them, the more likely they are to reoccur). And thoughts of...
I had dd in June before my last year of grad school. I went part-time (10 h/week on my assistantship, no classes, one advanced practicum and some research credits per semester). DH kept her for one day per week, and I hired a couple of undergrads for a couple more hours for things (like seeing clients) where I could not have her with me. Otherwise, she came with me to meetings, spent a lot of time "playing" with all the grad students who wanted babies, and I typed much of...
I know there were several mamas who had just started leaving their little ones last week and were having a lot of sadness about it--just wondering how everyone is doing...
Try to remember that you're only halfway through your very first week of this. It really is not always going to be this hard, although I know that's difficult to believe right now. And the benefits of staying with your Ph.D. are going to be more than financial. Your advisor sounds much nicer than mine, who has no kids and who, although she did let me bring DD to meetings, never could remember her name (really!) and never gave me any emotional support.
s What a tough situation! I don't like that the teacher seems to be blaming you for your child's adjustment. Even when my daughter had a hard time at first (age 14 months), the teachers were completely understanding about my wanting to stay and observe and call to check in frequently. Also, it's totally normal for a 23 month old to want to get up and move around while eating. I mean, they can gently teach them to wait, but it sounds like this teacher is pretty inflexible....
I'm glad it went well. Sounds like you have nice friends. I would not feel badly about crying in class. I also was teary with colleagues the first day I left DD. I was terrified that I would start crying in session with a patient if they asked about her (now THAT would not have been good), but it didn't happen. I thought I would never feel okay about leaving her, but pretty soon I began to look forward to having time with other grown ups where I wasn't constantly...
DD stuttered for a while right before turning 3. It was right when her vocabulary was really exploding. I think it's normal unless it persists past a certain point.
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