or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:

Posts by LilyGrace

Quote: Originally Posted by Swan3 And for many of us, it's not practical to have a lighter stroller. I'm in a really cold place and it was the larger stroller that allowed me to weather proof, have a carseat handy for if I needed to cab it back with groceries and space for the groceries themselves! We had no car so it was really the most practical thing for us. For the two seconds it might take to get around someone with a "behemoth", especially...
One book?? Eek. I would have to say a history encyclopedia, either Kingfisher or Usborne. Science can be done through mostly observation, math builds on itself, reading and writing are cross-skills that go through every subject (especially with a CM approach). But I would rely on the history encyclopedia to help with the minor details of fact and order. If I could have more than one book, I'd add these as well: A science encyclopedia Usborne Mystery & Marvels...
I'll admit, I have a problem with strollers. Too many of them are 'cadillacs' - huge things that have shocks and off-road tires that don't belong in stores. And parents are careless with them. I love children, but if there's a double stroller in the middle of the aisle of a crowded restroom, I'm going to curse the parents under my breath. If more people used smaller strollers that were a single person wide and didn't take up a good portion of close areas, I don't...
I'm......I don't know. I'd have to say full of routine, focused on independence/gradual responsibility, natural/logical consequences, and very laid back. Can that all go together? I'm trying to raise an adult. I try to make sure the family runs smooth no matter what else is going on. It is very nice to know that wherever we are in the world, the same rules apply, the same routines happen. I try to make it the one constant thing in our lives. I know right now that...
Take a look at the book How To Teach What Really Happened. It's not a curriculum. It's an approach philosophy that keeps history focused more on the people who lived through it and how to look at different perspectives of the same story. It's asking questions and guiding children through developing a social awareness and investigating the facts. You might also like Sonlight's reading lists. They have a lot of good books that give the story without being...
We enforce room cleaning every week. Daily the room must be tidy and the bed made, but once a week (anytime during the week), these chores have to happen: -bed stripped of sheets -laundry taken to the laundry room -surfaces dusted -drawers organized -floor swept Mostly it's to keep things semi-clean. We don't own the house and bugs/ants are too common pests, so this ensures that candy wrappers, cups, etc. are taken care of before the mess becomes overwhelming. ...
I think.....sometimes, it's just about timing. Dh and I tag team, but there's an unspoken rule that at 5pm we both get "off work" and everything after is 50/50. It works out well. We both have a need to relax for 5-10 minutes, too, so he usually takes his time as soon as he walks in the door and I take mine while he's talking to The Kid. If he didn't have that little bit of transition time, that breather, I could see him feeling overwhelmed. As it is, he often cooks...
Quote: Originally Posted by suabel I'm a kinder teacher. Here's what I do: we do the traffic light signal idea, just red, yellow, green. Everyone starts on green and after a warning might move to yellow (think) and then to red (stop). At red the child fills out a behavior contract with me (dictates and draws what choice they made this time and what choice they'll make next time). Then they take it home and discuss it with a parent. They bring it...
Check out Noeo, Real Science 4 Kids, and R.E.A.L. Science. We use Noeo, which is put together by a Christian company. (we're secular). I like it because it uses regular books instead of textbooks, follows a Charlotte Mason/classical guide by having students create their own notebook/textbook, and has this statement on their website: We assume that Bible study is already an integral and essential part of the child's daily schedule. We believe that science, for...
Public schools really took off during the period after the Civil War and before 1910, thanks in part to the push for child labor laws. Since children were unable to fill their days with work and the cities were becoming filled with recent immigrants they needed a place where basic indoctrination into the "American way of life" could happen. School was that place. More geographically speaking, the American South's Reconstruction period showed a great increase in schools...
New Posts  All Forums: