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Posts by lifetapestry

Quote: Originally Posted by NoraB When I was growing up, I was told how "smart" I was. I overheard my mom telling family members that I was smart b/c I got all As on a report card, etc. I felt intense pressure to be "smart.' I also felt that anything less than a A meant that I was not smart. If I did poorly on a test, it was hard to avoid the conclusion that I was not really smart. Instead of loving learning for its own sake and enjoying my successes on...
Quote: Originally Posted by loved Here's where I get upset with the "good girl/good boy" stuff: my dd - who is 5 has taken to saying things like, "I'm a good girl - I put my toys away (when so and so did not)." I hear what she's NOT saying: "X is BAD because she didn't put the toys away." I think it is a false assumption to believe that just because a child believes that she is good for doing x,y, and z, doesn't mean that she thinks she is...
My son will be 4 at the end of July. He was a "late talker" who didn't start speaking until nearly 3 but whose language is now normal. Do they know their alphabet and recognize letters? He has been able to recognize upper and lower case letters since he was about 2 1/2. Can they associate letters with the corresponding sound? Can they identify initial consonant sounds (F is for fish, B is for ball, etc)? Yes, he's been doing this at his own initiative for...
Quote: Originally Posted by lizamann What about just saying, "I love you!" and that you love spending time with him, how lucky you are to be his mommy, instead of telling him how "good" he is? I'm not saying this as a suggestion to you, but rather because I'm interested to hear how you think telling him he's a good boy is different from or better than the above statements . Well, this thread is about saying "good" or not, not about all the...
Quote: Originally Posted by Dal Saying a kid is "being a good girl/boy" tells them that they are being judged and that when they aren't acting that way, they are sometimes bad. Most people don't like to feel judged. I don't really understand this, because I think it is impossible not to "judge" your children. They can certainly sense your approval or disapproval even if you don't verbally express anything. And approval/nonapproval is part of...
SID = Sensory Integration Disorder (Dysfunction) -- google it and you'll get lots of good info. My 3 1/2 year old is a real toucher-- he loves to run his hand along my arms, across my butt if I'm bending over (though he always is told this is inappropriate), around my throat (though again I have some triggers for this so I try to discourage gently). Sometimes he is in my personal space, pushing against me if I'm sitting down, climbing up on me, etc, that I just feel...
We have no power struggles at our house about cleaning up messes, and we have no messes of any significant nature. I also think that some kids have to be guided into understanding the meaning of cooperation, which to me means reciprocity: you help me do what I want done and I will help you do what you want done. The method is very simple: I observe (or help make) said mess. At a time when I know I can spend a few minutes helping, I ask DS (almost 4, although I've...
I agree with Kathy's perspective that it's a good thing to talk to the teachers, but I also think that it is "inappropriate" behavior. Not "bad" or "unusual" behavior for his age, but to me inappropriate means that we don't do that or say that in this place. At 3, he is old enough to understand that he can either talk loudly outside the classroom so he won't disturb other people, or he can stay in the class and be quiet. I think that allowing him to disturb the class...
Quote: Originally Posted by Mizelenius Something that always comes to mind in these discussions: Can you sleep through (most) nursing sessions? I can't-- I have found that people who really struggle with sleep issues usually cannot sleep through nursing sessions. It makes a huge difference, IMO. Yep, I agree. I also think that it depends on the number of nightwakings, and how close they are together. I remember feeling very rested...
I think you need to empower her to be self-directed in her "work" (as they like to say in Montessori) rather than depending upon you for direction. Have you tried asking these questions: 1. What would you like to do? 2. What are all the things you can think of to do? Let's write them down (you can use this list later?) 3. Let's look at our list of things to do (this will help with reading and/or word recognition). Karla
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