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Posts by onetrumpeter

We didn't get vit K for our son and they would have refused service (and almost did; they did the newborn exam and it was during that exam we were told we *must* get it).  I was not in a good place to look for a different doctor and sort of felt strong-armed.  TBH, though, when I'd inquired about the newborn exam when DS was still in utero, she'd expressed that they'd want/require vit K was well as eye drops.  So we said we gave him the eye ointment ;)  But we couldn't...
limette - or anyone - what's a paddock vs. a run?   thanks for the info, too :)  I'm learning a lot!
Thanks, all - SO appreciate your ideas and experience.  I'd never heard of "T" posts - just looked at some youtube vids to get a better idea.  I now semi-understand the posts (and how it'd still be hard to move them; don't know why I envisioned it being easy to move a fence, lol!)   And for fence posts, it looks like post hole digging or post pounding are the two options, right?   kimmom, thanks for saying it's not easy to move a big fence.   I googled page wire fence and...
We've seen deer down my our tot lot and noticed scat yesterday.  Can/should I use it for fertilizer?!  could I just put it into my compost?  or is it like cow/horse manure that needs to cure first?   I also wondered if I could take some of the rich looking soil (I'd guess from broken down leaves and such) back to our yard...  not sure if that's OK - if I just took a bit?  half a wheelbarrow or something?
wow, just wanted to thank you all for such helpful info!!!  the butchering part totally spooks me out and I don't know if I could do it but I appreciate the info to learn about a different meat possibility.  someone mentioned a book - will have to look for that.  thanks again!
Say you move to a house that has no fencing?  What types of containment are there?  I envision something like movable fencing (I think I've heard of it; doubt I'd make that up but I never know lol!) where the, e.g., goats can graze/forage in a certain area for a couple days then I move them to a new area?  Or do you fence in as much as you can and the animals forage all over the whole area?  Sorry if this is a dumb question!  I've seen big farms (big to me is 30 acres)...
oh my.  almost tempted to start a new thread except I'm not sure my inexperience in gardening warrants it, lol :)   In my research on double digging, and Biointensive, and then OwenNZoe's response here, I found a couple archived articles from motherearth news... suggesting a different approach of "no till."  didn't even know there were nearly opposing viewpoints; figured some sort of tilling was the only way.  I think Ruth Stout was one auther, and   hmmm. ...
thanks for sharing.  interesting.  I'm still waaaaay a novice and had to look up "sheet mulching."  it does sound a lot easier.  but I have so little space that probably double digging it wouldn't take me that long, either.  just trying to figure out a good plan.  is succession planting concerned with what's planted after what?  like "crop rotation?"  lots of new terms for me.  trying to not be afraid of all the new concepts!   still wondering about winter sowing! :)
anyone using this "method"?  it seems to involve 8 main components: 1) deep soil prep (double dug raised beds); 2) composting; 3)intensive planting; 4)companion planting; 5) carbon farming; 6) calorie farming; 7) using open-pollinated seeds; and 8) a whole-system farming method (using all the other 7 components, I think).   I'm trying to decide if it's an approach worth delving into for us.  We have very limited space: a 4'x10' space and a 5x10' space, approx, and it...
I just checked out "How to Grow More Vegetables" by John Jeavons.  He describes a "double digging" way to help the soil.  It seems very complicated to me and beyond my understanding w/o re-reading it many times, honestly, but I'm quite a newbie at gardening beyond stick-a-plant-from-the-nursery-in-the-ground-and-hope-for-the-best, lol.  I've gotten decent results w/ that method :) but think for longterm it's probably better to help your soil be healthy and he describes...
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