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Posts by IdentityCrisisMama

I lived in Europe for 3 years with a toddler - it really is a different situation in terms of exposure to the marketing stuff. 
 Not the OP, and we do watch TV, but I can answer a bit on the character thing.  One thing to take into consideration is that I think a large number of our members are from the US. To me, this is very much a cultural consideration because, if you are in the States, we have taken cross-marketing to the most ridiculous degree. Snack foods, clothing, and books are cross-marketed with the popular TV and movies. In the States the attachment to characters can have the potential...
Yep!  We've been in both situations now. When my DC was in 3-5th grade she did not really have homework but she did afterschool tutoring and just lots and lots and lots of extra reading help in various forms. It was HARD, hard work as a family. We are now a family that doesn't help so I can shed some light on that too. We don't refuse to help but DC seems to really want to do this on her own. I think I could probably be a bit more invested but I also think that's not...
I agree with Beanma and Miranda as well. My read on your OP was a sort of half-vent/half trying to get some perspective but I do agree it's important to be careful to assume too much from casual conversations.    I also really agree that parents helping kids follow through on commitments is entirely appropriate guidance.  And, I can say that with zero defensiveness or bias because we lucked into a kid who gets her work done on her own. It's a skill and not all kids are...
I loved waiting tables. I also loved bartending. Both did get a bit old for me when all my friends had day jobs and I was the only one working odd hours. I also had a sweet administrative job for a while and just hated it. I worked with people I knew my whole life and loved with the bottom of my heart...but I hated the work of moving papers and entering stuff in the computer. Nope, not for me. Waiting tables/bartending is super interesting, I think. But, I'm done with that...
I'm with Miranda on this one in that hearing and vision would fall in the category of educational testing in my mind. And, because it's totally non-invasive, it doesn't seem like something that schools need to communicate home about.    I also agree with the PPs who suggest looking through all the paperwork before putting too much energy into being upset about not being notified. It's possible that it's listed on the district website, calendar, or, yea, buried in that...
My DC had her first required HW starting in 6th grade, which was this school year. I felt really conflicted for a while in terms of how to help her. On the one hand I didn't want to be the parent who was "building the volcano". On the other hand, my DH had a reading delay and I wanted her to have at the very least similar support at home to what her peers were getting. I felt like with her delay and an elementary school with no homework, that she would really sink if her...
Lturtle 
My guess is that it's a sort of emotionally charged attention. I wouldn't say that there's something your NOT giving her but more like the reaction she gets in these situations is SO INTERESTING to her. And, if you imagine that her goal right now is to learn as much as she can about human emotions and connection, it can be pretty easy to understand that she is getting something very interesting out of this situation.    I hesitate with this advice a little because it...
I agree with FM, if you think it's attention seeking, then a great way to go is to provide extra attention. Perhaps she can come in the kitchen with you while you're getting the tea. You can say something like, "I know you're having trouble playing gently when I'm out of the room so I am going to take your hand and you are going to join me in the kitchen and help me get the tea."  Then just take her hand and go. 
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