or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:

Posts by fizgig

I don't have time to write much, but wanted to second the developmental pediatrician as the place to start.  The other two are much more limited in what they can diagnose (and what they are familiar with) but a good dev ped should be able to look at everything on the table - medical, psychological, developmental.  I think its important to make sure someone is looking at medical stuff because it should always be ruled out first.   I hope you get things sorted out.  The...
This has been very helpful to us when our DS was feverish.  It conforms with our Ped's advice.   http://www.pamf.org/children/common/fever/   Some quotes: "When a child has a fever, the main concern is how sick your child seems. This is much more important than the height of the fever. High fevers are not usually dangerous."   "We do NOT advise alternating between Tylenol and Motrin when your child has a fever. Pick one of the medicines to use that you think works...
Totally just my opinion, but I would informally tell someone at the old school.  No need to make a formal complaint, but maybe mention to another parent?  Or even her former teacher, just as in, "hey, remember how we left because we were worried.  Guess what we learned in therapy..."    I don't know if that would open you up to legal recourse, but I find it hard to imagine a private, unofficial conversation like that could be actionable.  Maybe ask your lawyer, but I do...
To be perfectly blunt, your in-laws are wrong.  Completely, 100% wrong about what is appropriate or even helpful for a 4 year old.  If you are worried, look at the research out there on just about any measure of adult success and you will find absolutely zero correlation between success (academic or otherwise) and how well that person recited multiplication tables as a toddler.    I know it is difficult not to compare, and it is terrible dealing with pressure from...
Sadly Early Intervention isn't really "supposed" to be in the business of giving your child a diagnosis - they are really supposed to be focusing on where your child is, strengths and weaknesses, and work on improving the things that child needs help with.   What you are experiencing is very normal, especially in the context of people who spend a LOT of time working with kids on the spectrum.  I've found (as the mother of a child not on the spectrum) that they have a...
Can you do non-dairy yogurt?  I ask because that has been the only way I've consistently gotten anything into our DS.  Something about the flavor of yogurt masks the supplements.  When we were off dairy, coconut yogurt was a big favorite :)   I've also tried gummies which works sometimes.  But not sure how I feel about the sugar in those. 
This is a relatively contentious question because ABA covers a HUGE range of therapies though the differences are rarely discussed.   ABA began at UCLA in the 70s and was used to treat severely autistic and mentally ill people (schizophrenia, etc).  It was very "behavioral" in that it addressed only behavior and was very much a reward/punishment system.  The idea being that if you rewarded "good" behavior and punished "bad" the person would naturally be more likely to do...
We have a VERY spirited, terrible sleeper.  This has worked fairly well for us.  Not 100%, but we have it set for 6 and I can say "is the green light on?" and he knows its not time to get up.  The first few weeks it actually was like a miracle (I made the light the bad guy, as in "Oh no, we can't get up, there's no green light yet.")  Since then it has lost some of its magic, so he still has occasional morning where he's asking me to get up from 4:30 on. But, for us, it...
Well, this could be totally wrong so take it with a grain of salt, but could there be something sensory going on?  We have a massively sensory seeking DS that sounds very similar.  He is a generally lousy sleeper and it takes about an hour for him to wind down.  While he does, he is insane, wild in bed.    We realized a few things that help him calm down quicker. 1.  No sugar at all after 3 or 4.  I mean fruit or anything like that. 2. Make sure he has some protein for...
I'll agree with everyone.  It is possible to lack joint attention and have language delays and not be on the spectrum.    Our DS had mediocre joint attention at that age, and almost no words.  He has a severe language delay but is not Autistic.  But we didn't know for sure until he was almost 3.  His joint attention was always there, just much lower than typical children.  Same with his use of gesture.  As his receptive language improved, all his spectrum "red flags"...
New Posts  All Forums: