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Posts by fizgig

Well, I worked at PFLAG for a while so that would have been my first advice :)   My second advice would be to talk to your daughter.  I am in NO way a psychologist or an expert so this is only my opinion, but it seem like she could use some loving support right now.  Just tell her you stumbled on her forum post and that you want her to know you love her and that she is none of the things that she fears.  Self harm is a real concern for GLBT teens and I wouldn't feel...
Our DS is not on the spectrum so I'm sorry I don't have any great resources but I will say that, I think, the best thing you can do is get plugged into the system!   By system, I mean, take him as soon as possible for an evaluation with a good developmental pediatrician.  Before you assume Autism based on a few internet check lists, you need someone to help figure out exactly what is up with your son.  A dev ped can do a full evaluation, check for medical issues (for...
Wow New Mom, I could have written your post.  Our DS (4.5) is MASSIVELY active, and, although he can play on his own, it is rare and he almost always prefers that I am playing with him.  Which means that the only down time I really get is when the TV or iPad is on.    I'm at a loss what to do.  Most days I make sure we have at least 2 activities/outings planned which makes it easy to keep him off the TV. But of course it isn't possible to always have big outing...
Piglet, I totally hear where you are coming from :)  I also don't think being ASD is a bad thing, but I'm trying to encourage my DS to be proud of who he is, language delays and all.  I've found that, parents who assume DS is on the spectrum find themselves totally befuddled as to how to interact with him and that makes him feel even more insecure since he doesn't have a label that people can understand. 
Just saw this and read because it accurately describes me and my best friend growing up.  My parents were VERY hands off, I was allowed to make my own decisions about almost everything from 14 on.  My BF's parents were strict, very protective, etc.   She didn't rebel until collage (and even then it was minor) and I always made my own decisions since my parents did a very good job of instilling a sense of responsibility in me.   I would trust your daughter.  Maybe...
Totally agree with the need for our children to be able to understand themselves and explain to others why they might seem different.   However, I cringe mightily at the whole "spot one a mile away" thing.  Please, please stop making assumptions like this - to the untrained eye, or to someone just seeing him on the playground, my DS can definitely appear to be on the spectrum.  However, he is not.  Instead he has severe language processing issues which create a lot...
I spent some time working at PFLAG (parents families and friend of lesbains and gays) which is an organization for people just like you with questions like this!   I would give them a call (or you can contact them on line if you are out of the country).  http://community.pflag.org/page.aspx?pid=416  This link will take you to their "find us" page where they list local and international chapters.   Even if your son isn't gay (which could be entirely the case),...
My first instinct was that he might have a hearing problem, or some kind of auditory processing issue that allows him to tune out people speaking to him.  Before our son's receptive language improved, there were definitely times when he was zoned out.    That we are all coming up with different possible problems suggests to me that you really need a professional evaluation.  That you feel like he is less responsive than he once was would have me running to the dr...
what pickle said - look up sensory seeking behaviors.  The more you describe, the more is sounds a lot like he is constantly seeking sensory input.  Kids like that are very high energy, have difficulty settling down on their own, want lots of physical action (swings, spins, bear hugs, wrestling) and they generally like crowds, etc.  Basically they are seeking out sensory input (this is the opposite of sensory avoiding kids who want quiet, no stange textures,...
Our son also has MERLD (and probably verbal apraxia as well).   I have found that the receptive delay is absolutely the most difficult part of this journey for me.  When DS (4.5) can't really understand what is going on, he feels out of control and we are much more likely to have a bad time.    A few people mentioned the site naturallatetalkers.com which has been a life saver for me, it is specifically for kids with language disorders but not autism.  That is a...
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