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Posts by chaimom

My son took the Explore last year in 4th.  It's a test aimed at 8th graders, so it has quite a bit of out of level material for your child. We didn't have my son study for it at all-- he just showed up and took it, ad he thought it was really fun.     After getting the results,  we realized how much of an outlier he is and it was tremendously helpful to us in understanding his academic needs.  It also qualified him for Talent Search summer camps and DYS.  Don't worry...
I have a friend whose son was in food therapy.  We considered it for my son, too, but he never dipped below 15th percentile in weight, which was the threshold for getting insurance to cover it. My friend's son benefitted tremendously from food therapy.  He's still a skinny guy, but he eats a much broader range of food that my own son.  Especially given your dd's medical history, I would think she would be a prime candidate.   Also, re the food-- I never let my son...
It certainly sounds like she's opinionated, but I don't think that's necessarily a gifted issue.   (Not saying she's not gifted.)  If there's any consolation, I had one of those who is now ten and he grew out of everything except the food pickiness by about age 5.    I think you'd be better off handling each behavior separately in the context of your daughter's amazing will power. ;)     First, I would end the food battle.  It's your job to provide healthy meals...
We had to pay for our son's online math class.  It will be pretty pricey over the year (two separate classes), but there are cheaper ones.  Even if you end up paying for Aleks, that's only $20/month.
At first I was in the camp to tell her, but your follow-up convinced me that you have valid reasons NOT to tell her.  I'm not opposed to medical marijuana use and I think it should be legalized, but I've never used it or any other illegal drug, so I just don't have a lot of experience with this issue.  But I would be concerned about the discussion kids might have with each other and what they would tell their parents.   I do think there might be other parents who...
What about a grade skip now?  Obviously he can't repeat third grade math and its not acceptable to miss art, PE and music.     If you don't want a skip, another alternative is to have your son take an online math class.  My son is doing one called Art of Problem Solving, and gets to do the homework in class.  Your son is younger and ALEKS is another program (and cheaper) that your son might be able to work on in class, or go to the tech lab. 
My dd is a first grader and I have two older boys.  Playdates during the week don't really work for us.  We're all so busy, I just don't want to throw a playdate into the mix-- except with the next door neighbors, with whom the kids can play for 20 minutes or so  before dinner.    My dd always has a Friday afternoon playdate, though.  And frequently a Saturday and Sunday playdate as well. 
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If you really don't believe she's suicidal, I would tell her you're concerned about her behavior and references, and fear that she's getting it from TV.  Therefore, you're going to stop watching TV for x amount of time to see if that makes a difference.  I would be really straight-forward about it, but I would not call it a punishment, nor would I engage in any kind of discussion about it beyond that you think TV is giving her ideas for questionable behavior, so you'll...
I'll add one more thing-- one of the negatives about a skip for my son was the group of kids he would be with.     His current grade-- the one he ended up staying in-- has very nice kids.  The older grade (he was with them last year in an unofficial skip) are actually quite intolerable.  The boys were very out of control and not kids my son liked at all. I think there's something to be said for being with a nice group of kids. 
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