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Posts by chaimom

I have twins, so we went through a few squabbles at that age.  I think the most effective thing to do is to tell your dd what she CAN do, rather than what she can't.  "We talk nicely.  "We are sharing-- it's her turn now and when she's finished it will be your turn."  "Gentle touches."  "Use your words-- tell her she can play with it when you're done."  "Since you're not using the marker, it's her turn."   I have to admit that I closely supervised my boys, so they...
It does seem to me that if she runs a daycare, it's not appropriate for her to let the daycare kids go over to your house to play, nor is it appropriate for your kids to join the day care group because of numbers and/or cost.  I get that your kids think the other kids look fun, and the trampoline seems fun, but they're really not "free" to play with.  It's a business.    I would still go over and introduce yourself, though (without the kids).  And see if she has any...
We have a trampoline with twin 9 yo boys and a 6 yo girl.  We've had it two years, going on 3 and we are always shocked how often the kids are on it.  Just yesterday my three were on it for an hour bouncing and laughing.  We got it because their cousins have one and they love it when we visit (out of town).  It's literally the first thing kids do when they come over for playdates.  The second thing is play with the guinea pigs.  Then the toys.     I'm glad we have it...
I would have a huge problem with the mountain dew, but is it possible that she was just too hungry to comply? Did the sleepover kids want something? What does she say about it? If it were me, I would have told her what she could eat if she got hungry. But this doesn't seem like a huge deal. Now if she knew she wasnt allowed to drink mt dew and did it anyway, I would be very disappointed. I think I would talk to her about it, and tell her you don't feel you can have soda...
We do it a different way in our house-- we emphasize hard work, regardless of the outcome.  (Of course we want the kids to be kind and compassionate, too.) We also say it's OK to try and fail.  And we stress that the most important thing is learning, rather than the final grade or outcome.  I think that helps minimize bragging for the older kids-- they value the quality of the effort.   (Of course I say that a day after my kindergartener told me that she and her BFF are...
I can't imagine willingly exposing my child to a virus that would cause him pain, potential scaring or worse.  So, no, I don't think it's a good age.  
If I were you I wouldn't be tryIng to find a way around child safety laws. I'm kind of shocked the school was unaware of them before you enrolled. That would concern me. Look, I have a pg ds and two hg children, so I get that they are different. But your child is only 20 months. It sounds like she's very social. She will thrive in any enriched environment. My boys had a nanny who took them to the park, museums,book stores, library, zoo, etc. That's all a 20 mo old...
I don't think you can do anything about it.  Your friend very well may have an even tougher time as her kids get older, but it's really not your place to point it out to her.   I do know it's heartbreaking to watch, though. I just went on a 4-day trip with my 3 children and a friend and her two children.  I knew she had difficult, rude children before I went (we used to be neighbors), but I was really shocked at how they acted.  Her son is the same age as my twin...
FYI, that incident (and article) is more than 3 years old.
I have a 6-year-old kindergartener too. I don't understand the problem with putting a treat in your son's lunch box?  I think all he's learning it to covet "bad" food.  Why not give him a nibble so that he'll learn to self-regulate?     My dd won't drink juice (I never introduced it to her and she hates it now), but she wants a cookie or pudding in her lunch.  What's the problem with that?  She gets, for instance, pb&j, corn or green beans, a pickle and a cookie,...
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