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Posts by 1stTimeMummytoLore

You are very welcome! Like I said, I am super picky about resources so I poke around a lot and find many diamonds in the rough that end up working out great for us. I do have pics but they are on my camera which I left at a friend's house after a recent co-op event. I'm seeing her at a field trip on Friday and will try to get a few uploaded then for you to take a peak at.
Here you go!
Here's my opening post for this week's Homeschool Spotlight What are your kids ages and names/pseudonyms? DD1- Athena- age 5.5 DS1- Apollo- age 2.99 (will be 3 in June) DD2- Artemis- age 2.99 (will be 3 in June) Tell us a little about your family. Well. There's me. My blog name is Crunchy Mama. I'm a 30yo SAHM and former US Army officer (DH and I met while both on active duty) who use to say she was never going to have children when she was a teenager, but now...
i think a couple of folks already alluded to this, but when i was considering educational approaches, i was less concerned in proof that it works and more concerned with what would ressonate with my children as the learners and myself as the facilitator/co-learner. there are many things i like very much about WTM/neo-classical/classical ed and there are things i do not. herein lies a huge advantage of home education as opposed to attending a brick and mortar classical...
well, I do see at least one big difference between CM/TJEd on one side and WTM on the other. WTM recommends that your child is reading fluently by the beginning of 1st Grade and ready for a larger amount of seat work while both CM and TJEd advocate for putting off any more formal schooling until around age 8 or so. But yes, there are lots of similarities like focusing on the classics and such. I've enjoyed reading about all three, but then picked and choosen...
Texas- protected by case law. no registration, no testing, no portfolios. just do your thing.
Quote: Originally Posted by Black Orchid I mention because often we aren't able to see our own place of priveldge from within it, be it racial, sexual, religious, etc. Many of the statemens about having one or two "alternative" religions in the troop as evidence of diversity and recognition of cultural/relgious differences indicated to me that the posters did not realize the position that they might be putting that family in. Not when the poster...
Quote: Originally Posted by Black Orchid I guess you've never had the opportunity to be the minority in a religious environment. I would like to just gentle suggest that you do not make assumptions about the spiritual backgrounds of others and their life experiences with various religious environments. I am glad you and your co-op have found the right balance to honor your children and your families. I just wanted to share with others...
FWIW we have an atheist and a Pagan family in our troop also. The girls themselves chose to say grace before snack to mark the change in the pace of the meeting from one of more frenzied activity to something calmer and more relaxed. And they selected the grace themselves. This is the advantage of building your own troop with people you already know in your homeschooling community. You can build one with people you are already comfortable clearly communicating with...
I'm one of three leaders for a multi-age, multi-level homeschool troop. We have Daisies (my responsibility), Brownies and Juniors. It has been a really positive experience for our troop-- but that is primarily because of the parents involved and the active participation we get from everyone. It was, however, hard to find this troop. And Council and the local recruiting events were no help at all. I only found them because the leader who facilitates the Juniors posted...
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