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Posts by sunnygir1

My dd used the toilet pretty early -- she was out of daytime diapers by two.  I started putting her on the toilet around 6 or 8 months when I thought she'd pee.  We did lots of naked time and lots of peeing on the floor!   My ds has been a different story.  When I tried to start putting him on the toilet at 6 or 8 months, he would scream until I took him off; he hated it.  I would try again every month or so, but he always had a horrible reaction.  So, I talked to...
I've been doing some reading on this.  I think you should do some research on different cultures and choose one that is thick.  www.culturesforhealth.com has a lot of different cultures available.  Some of them can be used as a perpetual culture, but others you would have to purchase starter for each batch.  The other factor I've found in my research is fat content.  Higher fat content makes thicker yogurt.  You could consider adding some cream to your batch.   Best...
I do give my kids Earth Balance butter substitute.  It isn't homogonized like most margarine, and tastes pretty good.  They like it.  I mostly bake with oils, like coconut oil or walnut oil.   Be careful buying gluten free breads because many of them contain eggs or dairy.  Also, there is an awesome 100% rye bread that I love (Alvarado Street, I think?) if you can do rye.
Brown rice flour is an excellent substitute in cakes, muffins, and quick breads.  Really, you can substitute it exactly for wheat flour -- it makes the best cakes!   I usually bake with water, like in pancakes, but sometimes I use almond, flax, or goat milk.   Eggs in baking can be replaced with 1T ground flax seed beaten with 3T of water, other good substitutes are applesauce, pumpkin, yam, or banana.   These muffins are awesome: ...
Unfortunately, there is no licensing in some states.  And I actually don't consider licensing as an equal replacement for knowing where your food comes from -- an important component included above.  If I am buying milk from an unlicensed dairy owned and operated by someone I know and trust, I think I'm better off than buying licensed raw milk from someone I don't know.   But none of these sourcing decisions have much bearing on whether or not we should communicate...
I think your idea of starting with a list of foods you enjoy that are already gluten and dairy free is a great one.  It makes the whole thing seem less daunting, and less restrictive (look at all the yummy things we still get to enjoy!).   Watch out for gluten free breads, a number of them include milk powder or whey, so are not dairy free.  Udi's was mentioned, very light sandwich bread.  I think it is dairy free, but some of their products, like bagels, have dairy...
We were on a macrobiotic diet for healing as children.  I had chronic ear infections and my sister had chronic bronchitis.  The diet worked well for managing those issues.  I don't think we ate a lot of soy, though.  I remember tofu, tempeh, and fish as occasional treats.  We did eat tamari and miso more often.  Mostly we ate brown rice and steamed vegetables.  As we grew older, our specific conditions improved, and we moved to a farm, we began to eat more animal...
I want people to communicate with me about what they offer my kids, and I try to do the same.  If the child isn't a baby, I probably wouldn't worry about the raw milk with most of my friends.  Maybe once my kids are older I won't care, but I would be upset if my kids got Cheetos and Sierra Mist.  We don't eat that way.  The more I think about it, though, the older they get the less control I will have/want over their food choices.
I think the flavor is awesome with only dill, garlic, and salt.   My beans were totally fermented, certainly not ruined by capping.  But you can totally leave them open, there's no reason not to.   They were also crunchy, but did not taste like a raw beans.  I hope that helps.
Looks good to me.  Fermentation time depends on temperature, sugar level, health of the scoby, and your personal tastes.  I just stick a straw in there to take a little taste.  If it still tastes like sweet tea, I let it go longer.  If it's getting nice and fizzy and a bit tart, it's ready.  My first batch this time around (revivivng a scoby that had been refrigerated) took just over 2 weeks.  Sometimes it's a lot faster.  I don't think you can make yourself sick --...
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