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Posts by slightly crunchy

I am with others in that this type of experimenting with aggressive talk seems really common in many of the 3 and 4 year old children we have been acquainted with. I think calling it "bullyig" is assuming negative intent on the part of these children and is going way too far. I do remember what it was like to have one infant and have older, rough kids running around. As to that situation the OP described, I think I would have said something if it was my 3 year old, but...
If it is just that she wants to light up the tree herself, why not get one of those switches where it stays plugged in but there is a little switch to turn them on and off. Safer. We have one and even my toddler likes to turn on the lights. I still unplug from the oulet at night.
Could it be that you and the other mom were talking and that she was kind of oblivious, even though she was right there? I say that because it has happened to me before. Mine is only 4, but I find myself missing things that happen right in front of me because I am not paying close attention watching two kids and talking at the same time. And I imagine at 6.5, that might be even harder because the child is older and most of the time, he probably doesn't need to be watched...
We have the same problem. I have left subtle hints over the yeas of having a "simple" Christmas, and things have changed a little. But, we always end up giving some things away, to Toys for Tots or friends or Goodwill.
I wouldn't leave my babies in the car to return a cart. ven 5 spaces. The responses to this probably depend on where you live and where you shop, though. I used to live in a town where I would probably be okay with it, IF it was icy out. In moderate cold weather, though, I would take kiddos with me, or unload with them in the cart or sling.
Quote: Originally Posted by Mizelenius I might tell her that I enjoyed the performance, though. Actually, I make it a point to tell people that I enjoyed/learned a lot/etc. from whatever they have done. --- I only do this because hearing "good job" directed at ME stresses me out a bit. I think this is how GJ tends to affect me as well. I also take the same approach with adults IRL. I want to be appreciated and think most others do, too. I...
Quote: Originally Posted by maya44 People say "good job" ALL the time in a work place. It's "good job man" when you win a case, not "You gave a compelling argument that convinced the jury to award your client a million dollars' The REAL world uses "good job." It just does. I know a lot of people commented on my post so I am just responding to this one as a lot of the comments are similar. I guess I don't have a problem with the...
Well, if he is using them consistently, "aaap" and "ba" count as words. I am not an expert. But it seems like 17 months is a little bit early for an evaluation. But, it can't hurt to call your local early intervention program and ask about a time line for getting evaluated, in case they have a long waiting list. I am in a similar quandary myself, except that my baby is a month older than yours, also only says a few words, but is trying so hard to say more, and is...
So your dd, if in preschool. would be two years away from kindergarten? Even the more academic preschools I visited, weren't doing very much I would consider academic for that year. Introducing the alphabet, sure, and lots of crafts and games and play time. Maybe having DH visit one of the local preschools would be reassuring?
Quote: Originally Posted by LynnS6 In terms of praise -- I think it's important to note for people new to the idea that he's not saying "don't be positive". What he's saying (and this is backed up by research) "don't evaluate". It is, once you get in the habit, just as easy to say "you climbed all the way to the top" or "look how high you are" as it is to say "good job!" And someone like Naomi Aldort would say that descriptive phrasing is...
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