or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:

Posts by starling&diesel

In the heat of the moment, when I use words that I wouldn't normally use, I feel badly. When my kids say hurtful things to each other, I take care of the offended person, and when the moment has diffused, the other child (if not both) will talk about other ways of communicating. At 39 I still say things that I'm not proud of, on occasion. I can empathize. I do try to be generous with understanding and the benefit of the doubt when I hear my kid verbally act out in...
We have words that we just don't use in our family. 'Stupid,'' hate,' 'dumb,' and 'boring' come to mind. (I could write a whole other post on the word 'boring.' I know it's not a 'bad' word, but it is one that we don't use in our family.) This goes along with our unofficial family philosophy, which has been posted at kid-height for the last three years, on 3 laminated notecards: speak kindly be mindful gentle touch Those are our family 'rules.' That's it. Just...
Thanks for the responses, everyone. Interesting to read. I'd love to hear more, Miranda! My 5yo struggles with OCD, SPD and severe anxiety, and while we've always been on the unschool-ish path, I realize (now that she's school-aged) that there is no way she'd be able to cope in a bricks-and-mortar school anytime soon anyway, due to her special needs. As for gifted, I suppose she is that too, in that she can read at about a grade three level and is doing grade two...
Wow, a lot of how you describe your son rings true for us too! E has a very similar approach to her 'studies' ... viruses, for example. She's been fixated on them for about a year, and before that, it was bugs. But because we're doing project-based homeschooling (or child-led, interest-led learning) she just runs with it. The pediatrician did say that her intense focus on one topic at a time would make it difficult for her to adjust to a standard curriculum, and he...
Hi Pranava ... There's a discussion over in the Mental Health forum that might be of interest to you. I know that your son is very bright, as is my E, who is also just five (gosh, remember when we were PREGNANT?!?), and that many of E's struggles stem from the very mixed blessing/curse of her brain never, ever taking a break or pause. I've talked a lot about E's behaviour over in that other thread. E has several enormous meltdowns a day sometimes (for her it looks like Big...
That sounds so hard. I'm sorry that it's been such a difficult weekend. Again, I'm coming from being a mama to a much younger child (5), but after reading your latest post, I think I would take him out of gymnastics. It doesn't sound like a supportive place for a kid dealing with his issues right now, and it doesn't sound like they can accommodate his unique needs. That might change, once he gains some coping mechanisms, but for now it just sounds like it's time to take...
Thanks for this, @AquariusHome ... that just about nails it.How much protecting, softening, easing, padding, accommodating is too much? How much is too little? How do we raise resilient children when they come equipped with hair-trigger responses to everyday life? How to promote self-regulation without squashing their sensitivity and brilliance? How to help them integrate into their chosen communities (and encourage new ones) without pushing too hard?It's all so murky...
Moomintrolls Galaxy Zack Tale of Desperaux The Borrowers Trumpet of the Swan Charlotte's Web The "Amazing Esme" books are AWESOME. Main character is a girl, but she has three boy cousins who are heavily featured in all of the stories. She's a circus kid, they're all unschooled (although not in a 'message-y' kind of way), and they get up to awesome adventures. There is a bit of tension (essential in many good stories), but I like how it's resolved, which is key for me. ...
Bumping ... anyone?
@Peony... That is such an immensely helpful analogy. Thank you for that. Truly. I'm going to talk to DP about it, and see if we can empty some out of our bucket, in order to take on some of DD's overflow, so to speak. I find that our DD's behaviour is consistently unpredictable, with the exception of the triggers that we know of. We have a growing list of those, and it's helpful to keep our eyes out for patterns in her behaviours and reactions, but what I *really* want...
New Posts  All Forums: