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Posts by nashvillemidwife

You have 3 options. Let me know if you didn't get your pm.
I was a midwife for almost 10 years before I had a baby of my own. Becoming a mother did not make me a better midwife. It made more tired and less available to my clients than I was previously.
Again, if you had read the research that is presented in the articles you linked to, you would see that that the study the author quoted from was on the use of doppler ultrasound, which is a very special test used to examine blood flow in the umbilical cord and the uterus. This "evidence" the author presents in her article has nothing to do with the testing being discussed here.  Another Cochrane review that is often misquoted as finding no benefit to routine ultrasound...
    MDC should not be a forum for posting potentially harmful misinformation like that posted above.   Gestational diabetes can occur without signs. In several of your points you referenced research, yet you seem to be unaware of the research indicating that routine urine dips for protein and glucose in pregnancy are not evidence-based and it is recommended that they be abandoned. Also, I am not sure how you can claim that home glucose monitoring with a glucometer (that...
What makes you think the midwives at the Farm are still living in the 1970s and not practicing according to the same professional standards as every other modern midwife? Seriously, they are not the Mecca for all pregnant women who can't otherwise find a midwife.
I am also fine with no doppler during pregnancy but am not comfortable agreeing to not use it during labor. It's hard to listen during a contraction, and once you lose it can be hard to find again, so that you're not able to monitor how the baby's heart rate responds to a contraction.   I understand your concern about continued doppler and ultrasound use during pregnancy, but how much effect can it have in the last few hours before birth?
You know, Elizabeth, the ironic thing here is that I DO have a lot of respect for a woman's desire to have a UC, and if you were a rational, nice person I just might have been a midwife who would have agreed to work with you, provided that we could have come up with a very clear understanding of our expectations for wach other. But why would a midwife, or any person of any profession, want to work with a client who had such obvious disregard for them? No, you are not...
I am supportive of UC. I think that's a woman's right to choose it, and I will offer her all the support I can within the allowances of my professional capacity.   That said, are you aware that evolution is a slow process, and that despite the fact that we have evolved to walk upright, we have not yet evolved so that the heads of our babies have adapted to our upright pelvises? It's a biological fact: we traded up walking up right for more difficult birthing. Nature...
If you really understood the position of the midwife you wouldn't fault us at all, just like we wouldn't fault you for your attitude of entitlement.   Quote:   It's not a matter of conscience. It's a matter of prioritizing, specifically of not jeopardizing our licenses, our good standing with our backup doctors and hospitals, and losing our livelihoods; and not depriving ourselves, our families, our own children, of the things we stand to lose when asked to take...
Jenne, did you talk to her partner about her situation? She is not eschewing licensure. She is a very experienced midwife who retired from midwifery just before we became regulated in Tennessee. She just returned to the state and to practicing midwifery earlier this year and has been working on meeting the requirements for licensure. She does not attend births on her own.
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