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Posts by soso-lynn

That was meant as " Educating women about how they will need to fight if they want to avoid the epidural..."   Every single woman I have met who went into the hospital without a resolved determination to fight for a natural birth ended up with an epidural. I even witnessed a doctor trying to hold down my sister as the baby was crowning to get the epidural in because she had a fast labour and it was a big race to get it done in time...
The problem with simple education on the risks and benefits is that it does not take into account the fact that, in most hospitals, in most families, making those choices is not easy. I have seen many women who understood the risks and did not want an epidural end up with one because their partner was beside himself panicking while she was screaming or because of a vaginal exam that told her she was not up to par. Educating women about what they will need to fight to...
That's hilarious and tragic at the same time.     Dr Grant, I wish we could have this conversation face to face to get to the bottom of it all. Why do you think pain relief should be common or needed for giving birth?
There is no study. This doctor's argument is based on the same studies we all have seen and read in the past.   Are you seriously making the argument that, as an obstetric anaesthesia specialist, you have no stake in maintaining the high rates of usage of anesthesia during childbirth? I am not even asking rhetorically, I really cannot see how that can make sense to you.
That is exactly why we need a better system and why we need to work on changing cultural perceptions of birth. Simply trying to convince women that epidurals (and all the rest) are not risky after all is counter-productive.
It is very hard to give advice and help without seeing the mother in person. What she calls cracked could be anything from mild soreness to open, bleeding wounds. what she considers a good latch may, in fact, not be. Maybe she already knew what you told her but can't understand how to apply it to solve her problems. I think her comment was rude but I tend to overlook rudeness when coming from a new mother.   If she is local to you, can you offer to come see her in...
That is the opposite of what I said.   I want to fix the system that is preventing women from making informed choices and that is marketing its failures as guilt for their patients.
If there truly is a guilt epidemic, shouldn't the focus be on getting people to take responsibility for their decisions and fixing the system that fails them instead of trying to argue why things are just fine the way they are.    I make some unconventional choices and even if the entire world was telling me I was wrong, I would never feel guilty. I might feel duped if I later realized that I had been lied to about the facts. I might be disappointed if things don't work...
So, the only reason you think hospitals would promote interventions is if their pay is directly related to them? That is quite an insult to your profession.   Do you really, honestly believe that every woman who comes into your hospital with some hope left of avoiding unnecessary interventions will be fully supported? Do you believe that every woman in your care who gets an epidural makes a fully informed decision where all the options are presented to her? If so, I...
Wow, go read what I said. Seriously.   Guilt comes form within. As your definition says it comes from feeling responsible or remorseful. Women have very little power and control over what happens to them in hospitals so any guilt they feel is manufactured by people who keep telling them that it is all a choice and that the risks are minimal anyway. It is just like when a woman formula feeds, she will be told that it is her choice and that she should feel ok with it...
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