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Posts by Lolagirl

That is really rough.  I recently had a new baby when my toddler was just around 16 months old, and he was already a pretty clingy guy at the time I became pregnant.  I ended up in the hospital for PTL about a month and a half before the noob was born and was put on bedrest, which necessitated us having to get him used to NOT being carried around by me all of the time pretty quickly (and me being suddenly gone for a few days did have the result of making even more clingy...
I have to say all of the stuff you described in your post sounds utterly developmentally normal for a 4yo kid.  That doesn't mean that it isn't challenging and exhausting at times to deal with, but I really think it's over the top to describe any of that behavior as being the hallmark of a "difficult child."   I hope this doesn't come off as sarcastic or unhelpful, because my intention is simply to reassure you that your little boy sounds like a spirited and high...
The concern that I and other posters have in this discussion is that after a while, the 4 yo is no longer going to patiently understand that their life has to stop because of the baby's needs trumping their own.  The suggestion has been thrown around more than once that the whole family may very well end up being confined to home for as long as it takes for baby to no longer cry in ther carseat (possibly up to 6 months?)  The average 4, 5, 6 yo kid may be able to...
Just coming back to this discussion, and ITA with the above.    It's true that a big part of the anti-CIO rhetoric is wrapped up in (albeit limited) studies indicating that babies can sustain some neurological harm as well as potential harm to the parent-child bond from extended crying.  But, from what I understand of those studies they are in the context of actual textbook extinction method CIO where a baby is left alone in a crib to cry alone without any comfort from...
But that isn't what many are saying in this discussion.  There are plenty of other posters here who have refused to acknowledge any distinction whatsoever between CIO and the OP's situation, and insisted that a baby crying in their carseat for 20 minutes is equally as damaging as being left indefinitely in his crib to cry without any comforting or soothing from a parent/caregiver at all.  That is what I and some others here are objecting to and that is what we have...
Good grief, can everyone please stop with the inflammatory, oh no, you're scarring the baby for life and are dooming him forevermore tone in some of these responses?    Seriously, one of my twins had reflux and cried incessantly for at least 12 to 16 hours a day when he was a newborn.  I did everything I could think of to try and soothe his crying, from walking with him and singing to him and rocking him and cuddling him and so on (oh, and nursed him on demand of...
  But those incidents are broken up into 20 minute increments of time in between which someone has the baby in arms and is comforting him.  We are not talking about 80 minutes straight of baby crying alone in the carseat without comfort or company.  Perhaps we should just throw out the term CIO completely then in this discussion, because that term has a specific meaning that does not apply to the situation being described by the OP.    And I would ask what you define...
You're certainly entitled to your personal opinion that social outings are not a need, but that's not going to stop other posters including myself from disagreeing with you.  In my opinion, there is a real benefit for my kids to socializing with groups of their peers and camp meets that need in a way that a playdate does not.  And a playdate at my house only increases the amount of work I have to do (if mom stays, then I have to entertain her and if she doesn't then I...
  I really disagree with this.  When our youngest was born last year our twins were just finishing up their school year and we decided (after discussing it with them) to enroll them in A.M. summer camp.  As you should know, it is pretty common for older siblings to have some mixed emotions when a new baby is introduced into the family, and it's incredibly important to be sensitive to their needs and balance them with the needs of the new baby.  I'm really surprised that...
  ITA with this!!!   A babysitter who actually engages with a child and does fun activities with them, and then actually cares enough to do more than just dump them into bed at the end of the day is worth working out any miscommunications as far as I'm concerned.  I've had lousy sitters who sat on the couch and gabbed with her friends on her phone and clearly didn't care about my kids (and my kids didn't like her either) and I've had sitters who the very mention of...
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