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So I wigged out at the Walmart greeter today... - Page 3

post #41 of 181
Quote:
Originally Posted by AidansMommy1012 View Post
Not to mention that many people are in a financial situation that leaves no choice but to shop at the place offering the lowest prices. To make such statements about people who do shop there is insensitive to people who have to make such choices in order to keep their family afloat without breaking the bank. It's great that you have enough to be able to shop elsewhere. Not everyone does.
Yes to this!
post #42 of 181
good for you i think you did brilliantly, your daughters are lucky to have you.
post #43 of 181
Quote:
Originally Posted by AidansMommy1012 View Post
Not to mention that many people are in a financial situation that leaves no choice but to shop at the place offering the lowest prices. To make such statements about people who do shop there is insensitive to people who have to make such choices in order to keep their family afloat without breaking the bank. It's great that you have enough to be able to shop elsewhere. Not everyone does.
AND... in some rural areas there are literally no other options.

But back to the topic, I agree with the previous posters. You set an excellent example for your children about how to stand up for themselves, even if the offending person is elderly or disabled in some way. Now your kids know that they don't have to let someone touch them just because he is old or mentally ill, and they know that you will protect them at any cost. Great job, mama!
post #44 of 181
Quote:
Originally Posted by puddle View Post
AND... in some rural areas there are literally no other options.
: because walmart crushed them out.
post #45 of 181
Alright everyone, let's keep this thread on topic to the OP's post.
Any talk about Wal-Mart and shopping there or not does not belong in the Parenting forum.

Please pm me if you have any questions.
Thanks!
post #46 of 181
Quote:
Originally Posted by MaterPrimaePuellae View Post
ETA-- if he was just a sweet, possible disabled old man, it would seem more likely that he would be hurt by the yelling, not respond "just doing my job lady," iykwim.
You know, I was thinking this same thing. Something about the original post made me get a feeling of something more. Couldn't figure out why until you put it like that. That's exactly it. :
post #47 of 181
I am sorry but I am going to go against what every other person has said on this thread and ask if I am I the person that thinks yelling at an elderly or any other person for that matter is wrong? Ok you want your child to stand up for themselves but I think yelling at a person is not the answer and their are better ways to do it. Sure you don’t want strangers hugging your child but you could have picked your child up and walked away instead you are teaching your child that it’s ok to yell at others. Would you want somebody yelling at you? treat others how you would want to be treated.

:
post #48 of 181
Yikes! It's that mama bear instinct. I've had to say things before - some people think it's OK to touch/kiss/hug strange children for some reason.
post #49 of 181
OP go easy on yourself. I have a very sensitive child, and when he was little people used to frighten him... he had no business trying to hug her like that. The world can be scary when you are little... and you don't have control over much of it.

If you see him again, maybe say something about it not being personal, but some children are afraid of strangers, no matter who they are.

And sometimes you kin
d of have to yell when there are children screaming just to be heard over the din! So the yelling shouldn't be taken personally.... when it is just loud and you aren't being heard.
post #50 of 181
Quote:
Originally Posted by baltic_ballet View Post
I am sorry but I am going to go against what every other person has said on this thread and ask if I am I the person that thinks yelling at an elderly or any other person for that matter is wrong? Ok you want your child to stand up for themselves but I think yelling at a person is not the answer and their are better ways to do it. Sure you don’t want strangers hugging your child but you could have picked your child up and walked away instead you are teaching your child that it’s ok to yell at others. Would you want somebody yelling at you? treat others how you would want to be treated.

:
I think you missed the part of the beginning when they walked into the store and she told him not to mess with her. She didn't yell at that point. It wasn't until he came back and recognized that she was STILL having a bad day and tried something more, knowing that the parent asked him not to when they FIRST walked into the store.
post #51 of 181
Quote:
Originally Posted by baltic_ballet View Post
I am sorry but I am going to go against what every other person has said on this thread and ask if I am I the person that thinks yelling at an elderly or any other person for that matter is wrong? Ok you want your child to stand up for themselves but I think yelling at a person is not the answer and their are better ways to do it. Sure you don’t want strangers hugging your child but you could have picked your child up and walked away instead you are teaching your child that it’s ok to yell at others. Would you want somebody yelling at you? treat others how you would want to be treated.

:
I know I'm going to be flamed to a crisp, but I agree. I'm sure you felt frazzled and stressed, but yelling at an old man who was trying (awkwardly and probably wrongly) to be nice to your child seems like overkill to me.

I understand the need to protect your child, and the mama bear instinct. And yes, I've read Protecting the Gift. And in this case, I think you over-reacted. Sorry.
post #52 of 181
Yay, I think you over reacted.
Most elderly people that I know love children and, yay, sometimes forget about the boundary thing. But why yell? Most parents on this forum try to teach their children a gentle, peaceful world. Yelling at an elderly person for wanting to console your crying child is hardly that.
What about "Thanks for trying to help but I can take care of it."
post #53 of 181
Quote:
Originally Posted by chipper26 View Post
I only read the first few responses but I'm with you and the other posters, like the one above. In fact, I might even discuss it with the manager. That is way overstepping his job...hugging kids!

I'm a teacher and I get warned about the possible implications of hugging or touching kids in any way who I've formed a relationship with! This guy was clueless and creepy.

No one hugs my kids without my approval/permission! Good job!
Yeah, how awful, hugging a kid She should do her best to get him fired for that...
post #54 of 181
Quote:
Originally Posted by beansricerevolt View Post
What about "Thanks for trying to help but I can take care of it."

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post #55 of 181
Quote:
Originally Posted by beansricerevolt View Post
Yay, I think you over reacted.
Most elderly people that I know love children and, yay, sometimes forget about the boundary thing. But why yell? Most parents on this forum try to teach their children a gentle, peaceful world. Yelling at an elderly person for wanting to console your crying child is hardly that.
What about "Thanks for trying to help but I can take care of it."
She did say something to that effect, the first time that this gentleman made the situation worse.

And please don't forget how easy it is to get frustrated when you have a screaming child.
post #56 of 181
I still think that the warning at the front door walking into the store was enough. To try again and be more forceful at the end was too much. Yelling might not have been the best method, but she had every right to regardless of how old the guy was. The guy remembered that it was the same family that told him not to when they walked in.
post #57 of 181
Quote:
Originally Posted by southernmommie View Post
I still think that the warning at the front door walking into the store was enough. To try again and be more forceful at the end was too much.
I agree, it was to much. But the pacifist that I am thinks that yelling wasn't a great way to respond.
post #58 of 181
Good for you Mama! You were protecting your girls, I see no harm done.
post #59 of 181
Quote:
Originally Posted by southernmommie View Post
I think you missed the part of the beginning when they walked into the store and she told him not to mess with her. She didn't yell at that point. It wasn't until he came back and recognized that she was STILL having a bad day and tried something more, knowing that the parent asked him not to when they FIRST walked into the store.
No, I didn’t miss the first part of the post, in her original post the op said she smiled and said no thank you when he offered her dc stickers and went on shopping where dose it say she said don’t mess with me?
post #60 of 181
I might be wrong, but I think that most people would agree that yelling at someone is probably not the best way to handle even the most stressful situation, but the title of the thread mentioned wigging out on someone, so it sounds like she knows that maybe she over reacted, but was looking for some support in the area of
"we've all been there...no one's perfect...understand being frustrated..."

stuff like that.

I think most of us have reacted badly to things sometimes, and when it comes to our kids sometimes we freak out especially hard.

I wonder what the man thought, or if he talked about it later with someone. Maybe someone said to him

'we've all made mistakes...no one's perfect...you live you learn.."
whatever, I mean, maybe he will think next time. Maybe the poster will be have a better means to nip this in the bud next time.

Also, I think some people are imaging a greasy old man v/s an elderly, soft spoken man with some slight dementia....
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