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If you use a glass jar for a water bottle

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
Do you find that the metal lid rusts onto your jar? I was using a jar that used to hold peaches. I stopped using it because the lid was rusting and leaving rust on the jar. Does this just depend on the type of lid? Do mason jar lids rust?

Also, has anyone knit a holder or anything to carry their jars in to help prevent breakage?
post #2 of 10
I've used old socks to insulate the bottle when using the glass jar for hot liquids. I never thought to knit something special.

Yes, the lids do rust over time; occasionally I recycle the jars and lids and get new ones.
post #3 of 10
I crocheted bottle holders for our metal bottles - http://philhyde.smugmug.com/gallery/...15127408_8FJ4M

It looks a bit wonky in the pictures, but it works! I have done 2 others, with less open spots, and they work better. I used wool, and it does a pretty good job of keeping the bottle insulated - don't see why it wouldn't help protect a glass bottle.
post #4 of 10
That's a cute bottle holder. I crocheted myself something similar.

I have a few bottles, I think they once held a German beer, they are green with a picture of a castle or church or some sort of building on the side and they have a flip lock top that is made of ceramic with a rubber seal. I've found several of them at thrift stores and I've seen them at the beer and wine store too. You could probably pick one up there and drink the beer. Such a hardship!

They work great as water bottles. The lid seals really well, there is no plastic in contact with the water and I've never had any problem with rust.

I wouldn't drop one on the sidewalk but I've never had one break on me.

ETA: this is the kind of bottle I'm talking about.

http://cgi.ebay.ca/Vintage-Grolsch-B...125141001r8495
post #5 of 10
I use Lorina flip top glass bottles for waterbottles. I buy the juice for about 3 dollars, and drink it, then wash the bottles and reuse them. They're pretty, seal tightly, and work great. Lorina has two bottle types, one with screw tops, and one with ceramic flip tops with rubber washers. Those are the ones your looking for. Its a 750 mL bottle. (about 24 oz).
post #6 of 10
I use a variety of glass bottles. I'll pick up some Tazo or Inko's bottled tea at the discount store for 79 cents and reuse them over and over. I also have been using a Sweet Leaf lemonade glass bottle here and there (wide mouth). It is easier to pour in my own hot tea with the SL wide-mouth bottle that I got at the same discount store for 50 cents (full). The Tazo bottles are the perfect shape and fit for my hand. The Inko's bottle has a nice texture that makes it easy to hang onto. I use both for water bottles. I have a handmade water bottle holder I made from fabric that would probably work well for any of these, but I mostly have taken these in the car and left them there versus carrying them around. I did use an old sock on a walk a few times. LOL

I have not found the lids to rust on the specific bottles I mentioned, but I have had lots of rusting on other glass bottles we use for food storage. I have determined that laying them flat, open-side down in the dishwasher GREATLY helps minimize the rusting. As does handwashing and immediately drying...
post #7 of 10
We have some great Nalgene water bottle holders that perfectly contain & protect the typical 32 oz. size juice jars sold in health food stores. These are padded styles like this and this. The first style is easiest to get the bottle in and out of because it has a belt for loosening & tightening. The second style is more protective -- it covers more of the glass, but it requires more effort to get the bottle in and out of. Both work very well, though. To go plastic-free for lids (because the interior of *all* canning jars and jars sold in stores is lined with often-BPA, thin, unstable plastic) I just took my jars to the hardware store and custom-fitted corks to each of them. Works perfectly.


HTH
post #8 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by sunnysandiegan View Post
handwashing and immediately drying...
Don't let water sit on the lid parts after washing. Dry them thoroughly to prevent rust. And yes, mason jar lids can rust...a little steel wool can remove it, but don't use those lids for canning.
post #9 of 10
yes to that, we only use mason jars for drinking and storing food and over time they do just need to be recycled, or used for something that its ok to have rust around.
post #10 of 10
I've used Mason Jars as water bottles many times. I buy generic white lids at the Amish store for 10-15 cents each so if and when it rusts I just use a new one. I also have some plastic lids that are made by Ball.
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