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How hard is nursing twins? - Page 2

Poll Results: How hard is nursing twins?

 
  • 22% (22)
    I've never nursed twins. I have no idea what it's like to nurse 2 same age newborns.
  • 8% (8)
    I've only nursed twins. It was easier than I expected.
  • 5% (5)
    I've only nursed twins. It was hard, but nothing too overwhelming.
  • 5% (5)
    I've only nursed twins. It was really, REALLY hard.
  • 4% (4)
    I've only nursed twins. It absolutely did not work out for us.
  • 9% (9)
    I've nursed twins and a singleton. The twins were easier than the singleton.
  • 7% (7)
    I've nursed twins and a singleton. The twins were about as hard as the singleton.
  • 24% (24)
    I've nursed twins and a singleton. The twins were a little harder, but not by much.
  • 9% (9)
    I've nursed twins and a singleton. The twins were much, MUCH harder than the singleton.
  • 0% (0)
    I've nursed twins and a singleton. The twins were pretty much impossible; singleton was not.
  • 2% (2)
    I've nursed twins and a singleton. Nursing simply did not work out for us for either experience.
  • 1% (1)
    I've nursed twins and a singleton. Singleton did not work out for us at all, but twins did.
  • 3% (3)
    Other.
99 Total Votes  
post #21 of 46
I was twins and a singleton with the twins being a little harder, but not by much. Actually, nursing DD1 was SO FREAKIN' HARD as she was preterm and I didn't understand that I needed to be pumping like crazy, especially when I just wanted to be with her, holding her, and we were in the crazy lockdown AKA, the NICU. AAARRGGHH!!! But there were some nights with the milk coming in that go down in freakin' hard history for me with the twins. They sucked and sucked and sucked and sucked and sucked until I was in tears. And they mixed that with crying. Inconsolably.
But I count myself as so blessed with a lovely, gentle homebirth/waterbirth, and supportive midwives who came to our home to check on them so that our family could "stay in the cave", and just nurse and nurse. And I knew so much about bf-ing, and had great little nursers w/no issues. Maybe I should have voted singleton was harder, b/c it was, but those nights of two on me and never stopping........that was hard!!!!!
post #22 of 46
I haven't read the replies. I chose what looks like the most popular option: the twins are a little harder, but barely. The first 6 weeks of nursing my tongue-tied singleton were harder than anything involved with nursing my twins, even though they were in the NICU 3.5 weeks and I had to pump and transition them to the breast and all of that. That was tiring and at times a bit frustrating, but it wasn't PAINFUL like it was with DS1. And as they've gotten older, there have been times when it's been harder, but I think that's more just the added difficulty of having two kids to parent, not necessarily having two to nurse. So I'd say overall during the day it's exactly the same, just there are two babies nursing instead of one (and I can't easily wear one for long stretches because the other will want to nurse, but OTOH I'm not too into BWing at the moment, except out of necessity when we're out).

Nights. Nights are harder. By far, I'd say. I personally cannot get comfortable sleeping between two babies, although I've tried. I am going to get them sleeping in their crib again when everybody is better (we're all sick). But wherever they sleep, sometimes I'll be nursing one and the other will wake up while I'm doing that, and I personally don't have a good method for doing anything about that so I end up listening to the other guy cry, or trying to stand up and give him a pacifier, potentially disturbing and waking the one I'm nursing, or rushing the one I'm nursing so that he wakes up again anyway when I get to the other one.

So...between days that are really easy, nursing-wise, and nights that are tougher, and then with the easier start (in spite of prematurity), I'd say for me nursing twins is slightly more difficult than nursing my singleton, but not by much.

eta: Re-reading this, and thinking back on starting nursing both times, I think the major difference is that I was freaking out with DS1, and calm with the twins. I was so hormonal, had no clue what I was doing, and was in awful pain, with DS1. Lots of crying on my part. The second time around I just sort of knew what I needed to do and did it, and was blessed with babies who took to nursing early and easily.
post #23 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by christyc View Post
, so I was wondering, for those who really wanted to and tried hard, what these statistics might look like.
I guess I fit in that category...
Ended up EPing for all of my children. Singleton dd was hospitalized for severe jaundice a week after birth and developed a nipple preference we were never able to overcome. Twin sons born almost 2 years later were premature--same song, different dance. Tried to get them exclusively nursing for MONTHS. In the end, my boys had mostly EBM for their 1st year, though both experiences were the biggest disappointments/personal failures of my life. Fortunately, everyone is healthy and thriving today! :
post #24 of 46
I only have the twins, so nothing else to which to compare. I tandem nursed almost exclusively, so it didn't take any more time to nurse two than one (especially since DH got up in the middle of the night to change diapers - bless his heart!)

I think nursing twins - especially together - has to be infinitely easier than trying to juggle two squirmy babies and two slippery bottles - especially trying to prepare bottles with two screaming babies in tow. I was home alone during the day while on materinity leave, and I think bottles would have been a nightmare.

I LOVED nursing my babies!
post #25 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by nd_deadhead View Post

I think nursing twins - especially together - has to be infinitely easier than trying to juggle two squirmy babies and two slippery bottles - especially trying to prepare bottles with two screaming babies in tow. I was home alone during the day while on materinity leave, and I think bottles would have been a nightmare.

I LOVED nursing my babies!
Newborn twins are harder than a singleton no matter what type of feeding you're doing.

The hardest by a zillion times way to feed twins is pump and bottlefeed. That is what I did eventually.

But I agree that nursing is easier than formula feeding if supply isn't an issue and you're not also pumping or supplementing indefinitely.
post #26 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by mama_tigress View Post

Nights. Nights are harder. By far, I'd say.

.
:

nights are way harder, that's true. i am currently nursing one to my side and the other over my chest and tummy down latching on. i can't can't can't cope with the crying one waiting. NEVER thought i would do as much tandem nursing as this but it's not as difficult as i expected

a lot is to do with expectation i think??


Quote:
Originally Posted by sbgrace View Post
Newborn twins are harder than a singleton no matter what type of feeding you're doing.

The hardest by a zillion times way to feed twins is pump and bottlefeed. That is what I did eventually.

But I agree that nursing is easier than formula feeding if supply isn't an issue and you're not also pumping or supplementing indefinitely.
:

after expressing for only four weeks you full time expressing mamas TOTALLY rock my world with what you achieved. cjcolorado - please, it was a victory what you did for your babies and, really, if you see it for what it is you will be
seriously, think what credit you would give another mama, or your own mother if she had done this for you! i would be seriously prostrate - and in awe - and grateful beyond words.

see, this applies to ALL of us:

Quote:
I am woman; watch me feed my children!
:
post #27 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by shukr View Post
i am currently nursing one to my side and the other over my chest and tummy down latching on.
like, not right now, as in currently 'in this moment'
right now i'm only nursing 'the boy' ak - no computer in bed when playing 'special feats of tandem nursing'

my sentence structure is REALLY suffering atm
post #28 of 46
I've nursed both a singleton and currently nursing 2 year old twins

At the beginning, it was a lot more difficult nursing my twins than it was my daughter. They were premature, and one of them didn't latch for 6 weeks. As time went on, things did get much easier, but I think for me at least, it was still a little more difficult, just for the fact there were 2.
post #29 of 46
Didn't read all the responses, but I nursed twins first, and I checked it was about the same as my singletons. My twins were both pretty easy / good nurses, didn't drive me crazy with growth spurts, plus they were my only kids. I could sit on the couch all day and nurse if need be.
post #30 of 46
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sbgrace View Post
Newborn twins are harder than a singleton no matter what type of feeding you're doing.
Not if you had a singleton with a latch problem, horrible reflux, or prematurity issues, and then healthy, term twins.

Quote:
The hardest by a zillion times way to feed twins is pump and bottlefeed.
I have to say that I have nothing but admiration for moms for whom nursing will not work out, but still are committed enough to pump and bottle feed. That is just an amazing level of dedication!
post #31 of 46
I voted "other". The twins and my three singletons were all easy and none of them were hard.
post #32 of 46
I voted that my twins were a bit easier than my singletons. I've always had issues to overcome but none have been *that bad* in my perception - awful cracked bleeding nipples from latching problems with both my singletons and with twins I had a sleepy nurser with a short frenulum to overcome. Honestly I thought the twins were a little easier b/c nursing w/o intense pain *was* easier despite other issues than it had been with my singeltons (and I credit that to my previous experiences teaching me how important a proper latch is and making sure I was getting one each and every time). I've also never entertained the possiblity that nursing wasn't going to workout - ever - and I think that's helped. I remember shortly after having my first baby (singleton) I was at the mall buying a nursing bra and another mom gave me a "keep it up - don't quit" pep talk and I remember thinking how odd that was b/c quiting had never ever occured to me. I was nursing my baby - end of story.
post #33 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by lexbeach View Post
I think, most of the time, the FIRST breatfeeding experience is the hardest, regardless of how many babies you have.
This is true for us. It was a rough road at first with our singleton who was first (though in hindsight, not too rough a road).

The twins are our 2nd and 3rd born, and nursing has been very easy, especially compared to the first time.
post #34 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by christyc View Post
Not if you had a singleton with a latch problem, horrible reflux, or prematurity issues, and then healthy, term twins.
Very true.
What I really meant those was just that newborn twins is hard--feeding aside. The lack of sleep, the one of you/two of them thing, etc. I found newborn twins to be quite overwhelming. Add nursing and/or supply issues to that when it's so very important to you and it can feel crushing.
post #35 of 46
I wish you'd put in an option for tandem nursing. My girls are only 16.5m apart in age, and I tandem nursed them for over a year. I had a friend with twins around the same age as DD2, and we often compared notes. For the most part, she seemed to have an easier time parenting her twins than I had parenting my two- but there were other factors as well- she had 2 older kids and a stable marriage, and I was first learning how to be a mother and my marriage was falling apart.

I do have experience nursing 2 babies and had PLENTY of milk for both- DD1 practically gave up on solids for a while after DD2 was born. I had 2 in my bed, was alone with 2 babies all day long while DH was at work, and I had the added challenge of keeping DD1 from choking on something or climbing and falling- typical toddler stuff. With 2 newborns they both stay put when you put them down!

But, no, I've never nursed 2 newborns simultaneously, or had more than one baby who needed head support while nursing. Nor have I ever nursed a low-birthweight or near-term baby- DD2 was 9 lbs at birth and a lot "sturdier" than many newborns are when they're part of a multiple birth. And, had I experienced any undersupply problems, I would have, no question, limited the older one's nursing and fully BF the newborn- not something you can do with twins.
post #36 of 46
The twins came first for me, so I had nothing to compare that nursing relationship to. We had some latch issues in the beginning, and I had to pump to build up a supply, and there were a few days of suplementation. Nothing like that with my singleton. But once we got started, the hardest thing about nursing twins is the simple fact that two babies have to be fed and cared for. And no matter how they're fed, they must be fed, and so nursing seemed easier than any other option.

Nursing a singleton is easier in my opinion, because it's just the two of us. I can nurse lying down, and if I want to nurse while at the computer, it's possible.

But nursing twins is possible. It took me awhile to enjoy the nursing relationship, instead of "ok, they have to be fed again", but we did get there.
post #37 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruthla View Post
I wish you'd put in an option for tandem nursing.
She didn't because this spun off of a thread about Angelia Jolie nursing her twins until 3 months and then quitting because it was "too hard". So we're just talking about twins.

Oh and, anyone hear the latest tabloid news? Supposedly AJ is 3 months pregnant. Interesting, wouldn't it be, that's just about the time one would lose ones milk.....
post #38 of 46
My twins were 37-weekers born via C-section, were very very sleepy and jaundiced, were supplemented with formula to treat the jaundice before my milk came in (one was only 4-1/2 lbs & didn't have much wiggle room to let the jaundice run it's course as it did for my 6-1/2 lb twin). I didn't know what I was doing and when they were nursing as opposed to comfort sucking. I had to harass them to keep them awake while nursing to get anything from the breast and eventually had to use the SNS to get them nursing. The first 3 weeks were very very very hard. I cried every day for hours. I had a post partum doula & if it were not for her support, I probably would not have made it past a few weeks because the girls would have been losing massive amounts of weight.

After the first month, nursing twins was no big deal. People would be amazed that I was nursing both & I always said it was the easiest part of parenting twins. I never had mastitis, thrush, latch issues, etc. There were funny times when they were toddlers and doing yoga moves on my lap while nursing - you know in a downward dog pose, standing on my lap with nipple in mouth.

My singleton was a nearly 41 week-er, weighed 10 lbs. Had a natural VBAC. He nursed great from the start & other than me having milk for 2 and severe engorgement in the beginning, we've had no problems.

So, it was much much much much harder in the beginning with twins, but then it was only a little bit harder during their toddler phases of wiggly nursers and nursing every 10 minutes for 2 seconds phases.

Oh, and I nursed over 2 years longer than AJ & it was very sexy, too,
post #39 of 46
I had my singleton first and then my twins. I voted easier because it was a night and day different on how much easier it was! I EPed my ds for a month because he was hypoglycemic, deep suctioned, and nipple confused. I finally got him to latch at one month old and we were on the shield for 4.5 months. It was SOOOO hard. I got mastitis, he had a weak suck and a poor latch, I got through it but it was a rough road.

My twins were born via c-section and it did take longer for my milk to come in but those two could latch onto a wall and get milk . I found having two little bodies, not so tough. It was a little extra juggling but it went so much faster because there was no switching sides. I just got an extra boppy (had one already from DS) and I'd put one in each on the nursing couch and I'd put them on the ez to nurse one at a time. Easy peasy.
post #40 of 46
I've only nursed twins. At first it was way hard but now it's super easy.

My sweet babies arrived 6w early and spent a week or so in the NICU with bottles. My bb's don't respond well to the pump so I just couldn't express enough for them. By 2 months though they were exclusively breastfed, thanks to the super LC Leslye, the great support of DH, and lots of patience on my part.

We use the EZ2Nurse pillow and I think I spent an entire month sitting under the pillow. I even started watching TV! Gradually their time spent nursing decreased. The wrangling gets easier as their head control improves. Their latches improved with practice and as their mouths grew bigger. Basically, it all gets easier.

Now they are 9 months old and I'm hoping we can keep going w/o any surprises!
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