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Overweight Children - Page 4

post #61 of 125
This is a very tough issue with so many variables. I agree with pp that there is something to be said about genetics (I am obese from a family of very thin people. . .my sister is a size 0, my brother was a model, my mom was tiny--never over 110lbs. . .however, my dad was a different story and I have inherited his genes), however, there's also a lot to be said about nutrition and activity. I will admit if I worked out a few hours a day, I could be smaller (I do eat very healthy whole foods). . .I'm just not ready to go there yet. As for overweight or obese children. . .it's really sad how prevalent it is now. My DH has a student, 1st grader, average height, 150lbs and has already begun her period and has type 2 diabetes. She eats every meal out of a box or at the local eatery (total junk food). There have been many meetings with the mom, neglect charges, etc. . .and yet you still see them every day at the eatery for dinner--so sad. I have to admit that because of my issues with weight, I am a little more intense with my children. If it is a non-rainy day, the children are expected to play outside. We try to have many things to them to do outside, we all have bikes, we have a lot of outdoor toys, they both are in active lessons (swimming, gymnastics, dance). One thing here in Japan, activity is a pretty big deal. DD has gym at least 3 days a week for 2-3 periods a day, DS has gym at his school everyday. Every morning at school they both have 30 minutes of stretching exercises (even when there is no school, they are expected to do these exercises everyday). Funny story, the other day I was talking to DD about how I despise cleaning. DD says to me, "But mama, cleaning makes us genki (healthy and full of life)", "exercise makes us healthy and happy mama"--ugh for me but I am happy she's learning the importance of exercise and activity.
post #62 of 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by bwylde View Post
There are parents who feed their child healthy and they are still overweight. My poor DD has terrible genetics. She is an extremely healthy eater yet she nearly 70lbs at 4 (she is also just over 4 feet tall). She runs, plays and whatnot without getting out of breath, she's in dance classes, dancersize, ect... The doctor said not to worry about it since she eats very healthy and gets lots of exercise. I am not going to starve her or deprive her of the good healthy food she does eat (or stop her from nursing) so she will fit into a model that society thinks is normal.

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_Q26qzzetkG...h/IMG_3101.JPG
your dd doesnt look overweight AT ALL! Maybe someone should define what "over weight" means.

I think of someone who is obese, and it does seem like there are a lot more "obese" kids than I remember when I was growing up (70's & 80's).
post #63 of 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by bwylde View Post
There are parents who feed their child healthy and they are still overweight. My poor DD has terrible genetics. She is an extremely healthy eater yet she nearly 70lbs at 4 (she is also just over 4 feet tall). She runs, plays and whatnot without getting out of breath, she's in dance classes, dancersize, ect... The doctor said not to worry about it since she eats very healthy and gets lots of exercise. I am not going to starve her or deprive her of the good healthy food she does eat (or stop her from nursing) so she will fit into a model that society thinks is normal.

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_Q26qzzetkG...h/IMG_3101.JPG
She is definitely not obese.
post #64 of 125
Ok... I will admit I'm a little cofuse... where are parents getting juice with corn syrup in it? I'm thinking it must be an American thing because I've seen it mentioned as an ingredient in Juice and pop but I've never seen it on any lables.
post #65 of 125
My 8 year old dd is off the chart for weight and height. She is solid. She thinks she is fat because her best friend has the waif body type. I have always stressed that healthy eating and exercise are what makes a body healthy. Not what that body weighs. She also compares herself to her totally different body type brother. He is lean and lanky. I hate that I have to have these conversations with her frequently. I hate that she feels bad about her body and I seem to be powerless to do anything about it.

I hate that there are people out their judging my parenting based on my dd. There are so many factors that go into a child being overweight that to blanket call it child abuse saddens me.
post #66 of 125
If you are in Canada, it's listed as glucose-fructose (something like that). But it's the exact same thing as high fructose corn syrup.
post #67 of 125
Still doesn't explain the juice... all the juice I've seen in water and concentrated juice.
post #68 of 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by mamazee View Post
This hasn't been my experience. My daughter is over 90% for height, but only 70% for weight, and they classify her as "thin" because her weight percentage is lower than her height percentage.
Thank goodness it's not national then. I was told that only the weight percentile counts at two different practices. Even though I asked for clarification about the relation between the two or change over time, which makes more logical sense to me.

This is why I thought that perhaps it's a new recommendation, so people have not all got the hang of it. It wouldn't have bothered me much, except they were making comments about obesity and 'fat' with my daughter in the room, and at 5 and 6 body image is starting to be a big deal. Not so much with my kid, but since I'm in my kids' classes a LOT, I have heard other kids make comments about how they're too fat (when they are not) that totally break my heart.

I have no problem with obesity education and resources presented to parents, but considering that we have an EVEN BIGGER problem with horrific body image problems with older kids, teens, and twentysomething...I really wish that pediatricians could make at least some halfhearted attempt at discretion.
post #69 of 125
They've been hit with so many things telling them that obesity is THE biggest child health problem in the country (and maybe it is - I don't know) that they're seeing it even where it doesn't exist. It reminds me of when I was in high school and had seasonal allergies and a teacher swore up and down to my parents that I was using drugs because my nose was stuffy and my eyes were red. He'd been warned so much that he saw it everywhere.

As for HFCS and juice, there might be some fake juice drinks, like Hi-Cish stuff (dunno about that specific brand) that have it, but I don't think real juice does. I've seen them called "juice drink cocktails" instead of juice. LOL. They masquerade as juice the way "fruit snacks" are candy masquerading as fruit.
post #70 of 125
I've seen HFCS in 'fruit drinks', and some of the cheaper stuff. And in cranberry juice. (I've actually never seen a brand of cranberry juice that wasn't sweetened in some way)

But there are lots of low-cost brands that just have fruit juice concentrate and water in them. Though to be quite honest, it would not suprise me if they added things to the concentrate. I wonder if they'd be required to disclose that.

As an aside, I thought that juice of any kind was supposed to be put into the 'soda' or 'junk food' category anyway. It doesn't have a lot of nutrients unless they're added, and because it's concentrated in a way it's just adding extra calories. I could see its use to gradually get your kid to drink water, by watering it down over time, but...it's just like any other "treat" otherwise.
post #71 of 125
Yeah, well, for me the difference is that juice is maybe a 1 cup a day drink, and "juice cocktail" with HFCS is a no-amount-at-all drink. LOL.
post #72 of 125
In Canada they have to disclose what goes into a part of something (those are added in brackets) so it's just water and juice. All though the cranberry pomegranet juice we have also has apple and few other juices in it.


Also, looked it up the sugar/glucose-fructose can mean sugar, HFCS or a combination of both so I guess that doesn't help...
post #73 of 125
Don't understand any type of sweetner in Juice... it's like the time I found a brand of peanut butter with icing sugar in it... Asked my dad who would eat peanut butter with icing sugar in it.
post #74 of 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by MusicianDad View Post
In Canada they have to disclose what goes into a part of something (those are added in brackets) so it's just water and juice. All though the cranberry pomegranet juice we have also has apple and few other juices in it.


Also, looked it up the sugar/glucose-fructose can mean sugar, HFCS or a combination of both so I guess that doesn't help...
You can get cranberry juice that just uses other sweeter juices to sweeten it, but cranberries are really really tart and there's *something* in there. The cheaper ones probably don't use other juices. But I love cranberry anything and I've bought cranberry juice that is just sweetened with the juice of sweeter fruits too, so I do know it's out there. I've seen it with HFCS too though.
post #75 of 125
Wow, it's great to come to my favorite site and read that I'm an abusive and neglectful parent because of my son's weight! My 9 year old is definitely overweight, although not quite obese, and it's something I really worry about.

In our case (and, I suspect the case of many overweight kids case) there are a lot of factors that contribute -- among them.

Genetics? DS is adopted, and there's a lot of missing info.

Early history: DS had a structural feeding problem as an infant and toddler and was fed via g-tube on a continous drip. I think this wreaked havoc on his ability to figure out his own needs and get a sense of when he was full. As a toddler if he was hungry he'd refuse to eat -- he didn't get the connection between eating and hunger and putting food in an uncomfortable stomach made no sense to him. In addition, we developed some less than ideal habits -- e.g. when he was finally allowed to start drinking everything he drank had to be thickened -- the only palatable, natural thickeners I could find were sweet (we used applesauce, sweet potatoes, and vanilla yogurt most of the time) so he got accustomed to drinking only sweet things -- it took years for him to be willing to taste water. Also, when he first got rid of the tube his weight fell dramatically -- the doctors gave me a choice between pushing high calorie foods and going back on the tube -- I chose the former, leading to more bad habits.

Activity level: I'd say we get a mixed rating here. On one hand he plays a couple of sports each season, goes to an all day sports camp all summer, and we do things like skiing, going to playground etc . . . on the weekends. On the other hand we live in a tiny apartment, and often get home from work/afterschool care too late to go outside to play. He doesn't have the option of playing outside alone, or doing much active play inside, so if I'm not available to take him somewhere he's pretty sedentary. We also live in the city, and his school's playground is small. It doesn't allow the same kind of nonstop running games I see kids playing in the suburbs.

Asthma: DS has severe allergic asthma. The medications he takes in the fall and spring completely stops his height growth, while increasing his appetite. In addition, his asthma slows him down a fair amount -- so while he still plays soccer, for example, he'll choose to play defense where there's 1/2 as much running so that he doesn't run out of stamina.

Control of food: I make sure he eats a healthy breakfast, pack a healthy lunch and serve a healthy dinner each day -- but he gets snacks at school and aftercare, and is allowed to trade at lunch, also he spends a lot of time at friends houses and gets more snacks and unhealthy meals there too.

Even though I worry about his weight, the worry doesn't tell me what to do -- I feel like I'm constantly facing choices where I don't know what to choose.

e.g. Today I made him whole wheat pancakes -- do I make them with applesauce (low fat, but higher carb) instead of oil? Do I cook them in lots of butter (some people say that saturated fats leave you feeling full longer and lead to weight loss) or a zero calorie spray (low fat but too many chemicals?) I ended up choosing the applesauce and the tiniest amount of canola oil, partially because I was serving them with a couple of slices of bacon (back to that study on saturated fat).

Also making dinner tonight what do I do about fruit and vegetables? Put them on his plate and make him eat it? (clean plate club is bad right, but eating veggies is good?) put them out and let him help himself, knowing he'll eat less? I ended up serving a big bowl of frozen blueberries as an "appetizer" know I'd get more into him whe he was hungry, and then put out a big plateful of raw veggies and told him I wanted him to eat some, but it was up to him which ones -- he chose a bunch of carrots. The strategy seemed to work in that he didn't ask for seconds on dinner, or a snack later in the evening.

Do I tell him he's prohibited from eating the school snack or trading at lunch? If I do am I making him feel judged due to his weight and creating "forbidden fruit" or am I building healthy habits?

His best friend invites him over several times a week, and the playdate often includes dinner of chicken nuggets and mac and cheese, but also a ride to soccer practice (which I couldn't get him to without it) and time to play actively in their big backyard -- a worthwhile trade off?

None of this is easy, and I watch parents of naturally skinny kids making similar choices and not being judged at all.
post #76 of 125
Unfortunately the media among other things has convinced society as a whole that the only people who are overweight are the lazy, food obsessed individuals with no sense of self control.

Health is more important then weight and one doesn't dictate the other.
post #77 of 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by MusicianDad View Post
Ok... I will admit I'm a little cofuse... where are parents getting juice with corn syrup in it? I'm thinking it must be an American thing because I've seen it mentioned as an ingredient in Juice and pop but I've never seen it on any lables.
Sadly round here its pretty wasy to find most like juice box drinks have it may fruit juices have it things like sunny D and such often considered by many as "good" has it while its not really hard to find ones that don't if your not carefull it can be in a lot.

Deanna
post #78 of 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by Momily View Post
Asthma: DS has severe allergic asthma. The medications he takes in the fall and spring completely stops his height growth, while increasing his appetite. In addition, his asthma slows him down a fair amount -- so while he still plays soccer, for example, he'll choose to play defense where there's 1/2 as much running so that he doesn't run out of stamina.

.
The oral steroids he's taking also change his insulin response to food so he's more likely to gain weight as well as not gain height. My personal feeling on the inhaled steroids (i.e. Flovent or combo meds like Advair) is that even the inhaled steroids have some kind of impact on appetite and insulin and weight. You may want to look at a higher protein, lower carb diet (berries instead of bananas, no bread or pasta, lots of veggies and good proteins).

ETA: I'm a veteran asthmatic.


V
post #79 of 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tigerchild View Post
Thank goodness it's not national then. I was told that only the weight percentile counts at two different practices. Even though I asked for clarification about the relation between the two or change over time, which makes more logical sense to me.
We have not had a lecture either and DD has been 100%+ for height and weight since five months.

V
post #80 of 125
Quote:
As an aside, I thought that juice of any kind was supposed to be put into the 'soda' or 'junk food' category anyway. It doesn't have a lot of nutrients unless they're added, and because it's concentrated in a way it's just adding extra calories. I could see its use to gradually get your kid to drink water, by watering it down over time, but...it's just like any other "treat" otherwise.
True very true at the same time then add in all the other low cost "hidden" junk that many wont really realize they are buying so called whole wheat breads, "whole grain cereals" canned fruits and such that many many good parents look to getting as "better" alternitives to say cheetos to pop tarts but that are still loaded with soo much junk.
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