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Overweight Children - Page 5

post #81 of 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by Violet2 View Post
The oral steroids he's taking also change his insulin response to food so he's more likely to gain weight as well as not gain height. My personal feeling on the inhaled steroids (i.e. Flovent or combo meds like Advair) is that even the inhaled steroids have some kind of impact on appetite and insulin and weight. You may want to look at a higher protein, lower carb diet (berries instead of bananas, no bread or pasta, lots of veggies and good proteins).

ETA: I'm a veteran asthmatic.


V
Thanks!

He's actually only on inhaled steroids now (he was on oral non stop for the first two years and tracked below the 3rd percentile -- when he came off he started growing) but they still have a dramatic effect -- he literally completely stops growing up when he's on Flovent. I do think he "catches up" when he stops but the result is that by the end of allergy season he's looking pretty overweight while he waits for his height to catch up.

I do feed him on the low carb side -- we do lots of berries and canteloupe and not much other fruit, lots of lower carb veggies, but also a couple of servings of whole grain a day -- usually soaked or sprouted, although the pancakes were neither. He also gets a couple of servings of refined grain most days because of snack at school (sigh). I've heard that going really low carb in unhealthy for kids -- any thoughts on that?
post #82 of 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by octobermom View Post
True very true at the same time then add in all the other low cost "hidden" junk that many wont really realize they are buying so called whole wheat breads, "whole grain cereals" canned fruits and such that many many good parents look to getting as "better" alternitives to say cheetos to pop tarts but that are still loaded with soo much junk.
I agree. For years people have been told to look for whole grains and whole wheat, yet store bought "multigrain" or "whole wheat" with rare exceptions almost always includes HFCS. Though I've noticed that even some big brands like orowheat have specific breads that are advertised as HFCS-free, and those are the ONLY ones offered by that brand that are.

Avoiding HFCS (which I can't have due to its inflammatory properties) has really been the drive for me to bake my own bread, make me own jams, home-make a lot of stuff. Luckily I'm good at finding super easy lazy ways to do it. I can understand why people get totally overwhelmed though. If you truly want to avoid some of the nastier additives in our food supply, a lot of people really are going to have to go out of their way if they don't want to go 100 percent raw. And it's easier for someone like me, a homemaker who has a nice flow of income, to say "well, if they REALLY cared then they'd do it," but I know that's BS. I had a lot of help to pick up the skillset and confidence to be able to do scratch cooking and where to find hidden ingredients, where I can find a convenient number of HFCS-free foods, ect.

I think this is why when people are dismissive about how difficult it can be for some folks it puts a big burr up MY behind. I know lots of people who are overwhelmed, strapped for time, and theyr'e not stupid. And this is in the Seattle area which has a WEALTH of resources and access to good, safe food!! I can imagine how difficult it would be in an area that has less choice or less mainstream awareness.
post #83 of 125
Thread Starter 
It just seems like there is always an excuse. Of course if your child is overweight, you are going to come up with all sorts of reasons why it isnt your fault, right? The thing is, that there never seems to be a parent with an overweight child that says "yes. you know what? I do not feed my child the way I should, they are unhealthy, and I as the parent should put a stop to it". A child being overweight being caused by something other than not enough excercise vs too much calories is just not as likely as their parents would like to think. Yes, there are always exceptions. Yes, there are medical and genetic factors. But instead of struggling over whether or not to put oil or applesauce in pancakes, why not just skip the pancakes for something else altogether?
post #84 of 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrspineau View Post
It just seems like there is always an excuse. Of course if your child is overweight, you are going to come up with all sorts of reasons why it isnt your fault, right? The thing is, that there never seems to be a parent with an overweight child that says "yes. you know what? I do not feed my child the way I should, they are unhealthy, and I as the parent should put a stop to it". A child being overweight being caused by something other than not enough excercise vs too much calories is just not as likely as their parents would like to think. Yes, there are always exceptions. Yes, there are medical and genetic factors. But instead of struggling over whether or not to put oil or applesauce in pancakes, why not just skip the pancakes for something else altogether?
Wow

OK, tell me what to feed my child, because other than vegetables (and my child eats plenty of vegetables, but no one lives on only vegetables) I can't find any consensus on what kids should be eating (yes, there's agreement on some things not to eat -- foods like Coke and Ice Cream and french fries, but that's not what my kid eats).

Seriously -- fruit? I've already seen a post here telling me I shouldn't feed bananas (which we don't because he doesn't like them), whole grains -- I've been told many times that all grains are evil, and equally many times that they're essential. Protein? Fat? There's disagreement about everyone.

So, yes, tonight my child ate pancakes made with whole wheat flour, applesauce, egg, skim milk and a tiny bit of canola oil, along with a bunch of vegetables a bowlful of blueberries, a small portion of meat and a couple of glasses of water -- and therefore because of that it's clearly all my fault and I'm a bad parent.
post #85 of 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by Momily View Post
Wow

OK, tell me what to feed my child, because other than vegetables (and my child eats plenty of vegetables, but no one lives on only vegetables) I can't find any consensus on what kids should be eating (yes, there's agreement on some things not to eat -- foods like Coke and Ice Cream and french fries, but that's not what my kid eats).

Seriously -- fruit? I've already seen a post here telling me I shouldn't feed bananas (which we don't because he doesn't like them), whole grains -- I've been told many times that all grains are evil, and equally many times that they're essential. Protein? Fat? There's disagreement about everyone.

So, yes, tonight my child ate pancakes made with whole wheat flour, applesauce, egg, skim milk and a tiny bit of canola oil, along with a bunch of vegetables a bowlful of blueberries, a small portion of meat and a couple of glasses of water -- and therefore because of that it's clearly all my fault and I'm a bad parent.

That sounds like a great meal to me. What's wrong with pancakes and applesauce? Clearly I'm missing something...
post #86 of 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by Viola View Post
I was a fat child and am a fat adult, and now I have children who are on the chunky side, so when you talk about fat people deserving what they get and being child abusers, please keep in mind you are talking about people who share the site here with you. I would be interested in talking about sure-fire ways to get my children to eat healthy foods without basically telling them they have to go hungry when they hate the food I make. This happens almost on a daily basis, and I struggle with what to make for them, and they eat things that are less than optimal.
I really like Dr. Sears L.E.A.N. Kids program. http://www.drsearslean.com/ I have been using it as a basic way to teach my kids to stay healthy. The L is Lifestyle, the E is Exercise. The A is Attitude and the N is nutrition. We aren't perfect eaters but we are working as a family to be better. My kids aren't overweight--but I think they need to learn about nutrition and exercise too. Afterall, someday they will be doing the shopping and making the decisions. By taking baby steps (instead of trying to be perfect overnight) we have come a long way in having a very healthy lifestyle.

Amy
post #87 of 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrspineau View Post
It just seems like there is always an excuse. Of course if your child is overweight, you are going to come up with all sorts of reasons why it isnt your fault, right? The thing is, that there never seems to be a parent with an overweight child that says "yes. you know what? I do not feed my child the way I should, they are unhealthy, and I as the parent should put a stop to it". A child being overweight being caused by something other than not enough excercise vs too much calories is just not as likely as their parents would like to think. Yes, there are always exceptions. Yes, there are medical and genetic factors. But instead of struggling over whether or not to put oil or applesauce in pancakes, why not just skip the pancakes for something else altogether?
So who is the "you" you're talking about? I haven't seen the people with overweight kids in this thread dickering about what to put in their kid's pancakes. Perhaps I missed something, though, It's been known to happen.
post #88 of 125
With the pancake comment she's specifically referring to a post where I mentioned that it's not always easy to know what the best choice is, and gave as example not being sure whether to make whole wheat pancakes with applesauce (therefore less calories) or oil (therefore more filling).
post #89 of 125
"Back on subject, it's kind of interesting but the pediatricians around here really have a burr up their butts over childhood obesity. Which wouldn't be such a bad thing, but unfortunately they are ONLY basing obesity on the weight percentile at well child visits. Anything above 50 percentile is consider overweight. And you will get a lecture about it. Doesn't matter if your child is 90+ percentile for *height*, if they're over 50 percentile for weight, you will get the fat kid lecture."


Thank goodness for out pediatrician---he is very real about this. Even when my kids were totally OFF the chart he said they were proportionate and not to worry. I am sorry for you mamas that deal with crummy peds!
post #90 of 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by bwylde View Post
Thanks : She's so solid I cannot lift her without putting my back out, lol! DS is a few inches taller and about 15-20lbs lighter; same family, different body types. It just kind of hurts that many think that just because a child is very overweight, it is akin to child abuse. FTR, we're very low income and we don't have WIC/food stamps here, but I make healthy eating a priority.
I don't understand why you have come to the conclusion that your daughter is fat. Is it just the scale that you are going by? It sounds (and looks) like she is just muscular. Do you really think that other people think she is obese?
post #91 of 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by AAK View Post
"Back on subject, it's kind of interesting but the pediatricians around here really have a burr up their butts over childhood obesity. Which wouldn't be such a bad thing, but unfortunately they are ONLY basing obesity on the weight percentile at well child visits. Anything above 50 percentile is consider overweight. And you will get a lecture about it. Doesn't matter if your child is 90+ percentile for *height*, if they're over 50 percentile for weight, you will get the fat kid lecture."
Well, that's just weird and non-sensical. My DD is over the top for height (100 and some percentile) and around 85th percentile for weight. She's skinny!
post #92 of 125
My 3-year-old is "overweight". She's 19.5 kilos (43 lbs), which is the 95th percentile. She's also 43 inches tall--also 95th percentile. She doesn't look overweight, but she looks like a 4 or 5 year old
post #93 of 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by Annalisa84 View Post
My 3-year-old is "overweight". She's 19.5 kilos (43 lbs), which is the 95th percentile. She's also 43 inches tall--also 95th percentile. She doesn't look overweight, but she looks like a 4 or 5 year old
That is not overweight. Overweight is when you weigh more than what you should given your height. Obesity is when you weigh one-third more than what you should weigh given your height.
post #94 of 125
Advising a parent to restrict a child's nutrition is not the right thing to do. Period. Children, even obese children, need fats, carbohydrates, fiber, protein, vitamins, and minerals. Putting a child on a restrictive weight loss diet can trigger eating disorders, which can be deadly.

Bananas are healthy. As are whole grains. Children need nutrition and activity. If a child is active and eating a healthy diet that child should naturally gravitate towards their natural weight. Some children will be skinny, and others will be chubby. That's OK!

Clearly no child should be fed a diet comprised mostly of junk foods and fast foods. Some families simply do not have access to healthy foods. I lived on the south side of Chicago, in some areas the closest grocery store was a forty five minute ride on public transportation plus a mile or more walk, both ways. (please google "food deserts") Where I live currently, if you don't have a car and you work 9-5, you simply do not have access to a grocery store. Public transit only runs Monday-Friday during the work day. So low income working families might live off of convenient store food for weeks at a time, which often consists of white bread, canned spaghetti, ham 'n cheese loaf, and other low nutrient foods.
post #95 of 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrspineau View Post
It just seems like there is always an excuse. Of course if your child is overweight, you are going to come up with all sorts of reasons why it isnt your fault, right? The thing is, that there never seems to be a parent with an overweight child that says "yes. you know what? I do not feed my child the way I should, they are unhealthy, and I as the parent should put a stop to it". A child being overweight being caused by something other than not enough excercise vs too much calories is just not as likely as their parents would like to think. Yes, there are always exceptions. Yes, there are medical and genetic factors. But instead of struggling over whether or not to put oil or applesauce in pancakes, why not just skip the pancakes for something else altogether?
I think this post illustrates nicely why a support thread is pretty necessary. Then the folks who seem to feel that some kind of excuse is needed can get together and kvetch about my kid's theoretical lack of a good diet and lack of access to exercise, and I could talk to some folks who know what a crock that is.

Where should the support thread go y'all?

Oh, and ice cream is a relatively low glycemic food, momily. So not the worst choice in the world.
post #96 of 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by Labyrinth View Post
Advising a parent to restrict a child's nutrition is not the right thing to do. Period. Children, even obese children, need fats, carbohydrates, fiber, protein, vitamins, and minerals. Putting a child on a restrictive weight loss diet can trigger eating disorders, which can be deadly.
Thank you for mentioning this! I read this whole thread and this is the first mention, unless I missed one, about triggering eating disorders.

I'll be back. Gotta run my kid to school. And no he can't walk there. It's WAY too far away, no sidewalks, not safe...etc.

Be back later.
post #97 of 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by Momily View Post
Thanks!

He's actually only on inhaled steroids now (he was on oral non stop for the first two years and tracked below the 3rd percentile -- when he came off he started growing) but they still have a dramatic effect -- he literally completely stops growing up when he's on Flovent. I do think he "catches up" when he stops but the result is that by the end of allergy season he's looking pretty overweight while he waits for his height to catch up.

I do feed him on the low carb side -- we do lots of berries and canteloupe and not much other fruit, lots of lower carb veggies, but also a couple of servings of whole grain a day -- usually soaked or sprouted, although the pancakes were neither. He also gets a couple of servings of refined grain most days because of snack at school (sigh). I've heard that going really low carb in unhealthy for kids -- any thoughts on that?
I am no expert, but have experienced a lot with asthma and steroid side effects. I will share what I think I know.

It sounds like your DS is sensitive to the steroids (although I am not sure how common his situation is) but to have the inhaled affect him is a red flag for me. So I would believe that his insulin is definitely messed up and he may be having problems absorbing vitamins (be sure he's getting some supplements like B vitamins which are essential for energy production. Also calcium and other minerals which should all be taken as far away from the steroid dose as possible to maximize absorption).

Lower carb is probably ideal, but not without a lot of reading and studying and education on your part because you don't want him to be on a weight loss diet, simply a diet that works well with his metabolic challenges. I would maybe look at the South Beach books for ideas but be careful to avoid a weight loss diet. Look more at the combinations of proteins and veggies/fruits.

Unfortunately, I have not seen any books or resources specific to nutrition in the face of steroids. So you will kind of have to read the low carb stuff and sift and filter for the nuggets that will actually help your DS. Most doctors do not really pay attention to the side effects and don't provide nutritional counseling (which is so negligent imo). Frex, did you know that prednisone interferes with calcium uptake in the cells and can cause all sorts of contraction issues with muscles? Grrr. This is the kind of stuff they don't tell you! Which would be kind of nice to know! I myself now taking daily calcium supplements along with magnesium and potassium to compensate for this.

Personally, I would also avoid grains (rice, bread, potato) as much as possible, but that's a personal preference. And I would try to find a good nutritionist and endocrinologist to consult with, but ime that will take some digging. And again, you kind of have to do some homework so you can filter out bad advice. Plus, your DS will need to understand his metabolic situation so he is onboard with avoiding simple carbs. I suspect, his body will be affected by the steroids long term as that has been the case for me.

HTH
V
post #98 of 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by chfriend View Post
Where should the support thread go y'all?

Oh, and ice cream is a relatively low glycemic food, momily. So not the worst choice in the world.
Probably nutrition.

RE: Ice cream--I make chocolate mousse and freeze it as 'ice cream'. Very low glycemic, especially if you use a dark chocolate. Yum!

V
post #99 of 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by bwylde View Post
There are parents who feed their child healthy and they are still overweight. My poor DD has terrible genetics. She is an extremely healthy eater yet she nearly 70lbs at 4 (she is also just over 4 feet tall). She runs, plays and whatnot without getting out of breath, she's in dance classes, dancersize, ect... The doctor said not to worry about it since she eats very healthy and gets lots of exercise. I am not going to starve her or deprive her of the good healthy food she does eat (or stop her from nursing) so she will fit into a model that society thinks is normal.

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_Q26qzzetkG...h/IMG_3101.JPG
Your daughter is gorgeous and looks perfectly healthy. By whose standards is she over weight?

There are parents who feed there children really badly and if they've been given support to change but do not then i definatly think it is abuse.

I live in the uk and not so long ago there was a news story about a family who had their dog removed by court order because it was obese and the still fed it junk food....a dog! And yet children are left with parents who won't fed them properly!

Part of being a good mother is feeding your children the best possible food and if my child was an unhealthy weight i would learn how to fed them better.
post #100 of 125
The reason I know the problem isn't simply that people are feeding their kids the wrong stuff or not getting their kids enough exercise, is because I know several families with one or two skinny kids and one overweight kid, where the kids all eat the same stuff and have the same level of activity. There's obviously something else going on.
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