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Do you believe that eating fat won't make you fat? - Page 3

post #41 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by dearmama22 View Post
I haven't read all the replies yet- just the OP's question-

what you eat doesn't make you fat- it's how much you eat that makes you gain or lose weight.

I could eat 1400 calories of candy a day and be a certain weight ( but very unhealthy obviously!) or I could eat 3000 calories of healthy foods and gain wait.
not true actually.
post #42 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by dearmama22 View Post
I haven't read all the replies yet- just the OP's question-

what you eat doesn't make you fat- it's how much you eat that makes you gain or lose weight.

I could eat 1400 calories of candy a day and be a certain weight ( but very unhealthy obviously!) or I could eat 3000 calories of healthy foods and gain wait.
Yeah, not true at all.

I heard about the new gut flora study, too! Very interesting. The guy was on NPR for a while, but I can't find a link.
post #43 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by dearmama22 View Post

what you eat doesn't make you fat- it's how much you eat that makes you gain or lose weight.

I could eat 1400 calories of candy a day and be a certain weight ( but very unhealthy obviously!) or I could eat 3000 calories of healthy foods and gain wait.
I also disagree with this. In my experience and observation it's exclusive to each type of food. I was a raw vegan on and off for a few years, and I could pack in somewhere between 2000-3000 calories a day that was full of fats, and still I would lose up to 10 lbs. a week. Each kind of food has a different reaction with the body. Fat storage (and bodily processes in general) is a very complex process that can't easily be summed up with "calories in and calories out."
post #44 of 90
Oh yea, cycle changes - I no longer have cramps, PMS, acne, nada. My cycle is 4-5 days, not awfully heavy.
post #45 of 90
I CAN'T eat 4,000 calories worth of fat a day- I get full and have to stop eating!

If I was having nothing but sugar all day, it wouldn't fill me up and I'd down a whole lot more calories without even trying.

I know that, for me personally, cutting back on carbs leads to weight loss. Attempting to eat a low-fat diet results in me eating a lot more food, plus I have less energy and just feel worse overall. It's nearly impossible to cut carbs without upping the fat.

So, it's partly a result of fewer carbs and less insulin production, and partly a result of "feeling full and eating less food"- but together the result is the same.

Even when I wasn't eating a very low carb diet, eating plenty of fat still helped me feel full. A high fat, moderate carb, moderate protein diet allowed me to maintain my weight, while trying to cut back on fat led to overeating and weight gain. It's just that I stablized at a much higher weight than I am now- and had a much lower overall level of health.
post #46 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by WuWei View Post
An interesting hypothesis. Do you have a link with more information related to gut flora and body weight?

Thanks, Pat
Here you go:
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/s...oryId=95900616

"Gut and Psychology Syndrome" is a good book to read about the role of gut flora in our overall health. Not sure to what extent it addresses weight gain or loss, as I haven't read that far yet.
post #47 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by leila1213 View Post
Here you go:
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/s...oryId=95900616

"Gut and Psychology Syndrome" is a good book to read about the role of gut flora in our overall health. Not sure to what extent it addresses weight gain or loss, as I haven't read that far yet.
That is fascinating!

I also believe that eating fat will not make you fat. I gain weight when I eat too many carbs. I feel much better, my metabolism is faster, and I lose weight when my fat intake is increased. I do not cut out carbs completely. I eat veggies, and fruit, and occasionally some brown rice, but I do limit my carb intake.
post #48 of 90
i have to limit carbs... and can't have artificial coloring (apparently my body refuses to eat bad food whether i like it or not lol) b/c if i eat cards or red dye its like a drug.. im all spaced out all day or i bounce off the walls.
post #49 of 90
To answer the title of the thread - I know eating fat doesn't make me fat. Since including plenty of fat in my diet, I've gone down 3 dress sizes.
post #50 of 90
I'm 5'6", 105 pounds, down from 185 pounds, 230 at my heaviest. I eat up to 60% of my daily calories in fat, and I eat more calories in a week than I 'should' be able to and I still stay thin. I go over 3000 calories at least two days a week now, and average 2200 a day on the other days. To put on weight, I have to increase my carbs and decrease my fat.
post #51 of 90
What I eat definitely matters.

I think a lot of weight gain and difficulty losing weight has a lot to do w/ the body being out of balance, inflamed, or subclinical malnutrition. It's amazing how many ppl eat more than enough CALORIES but nowhere near enough nutritents...they are fat and have trouble losing weight. Eating like crap may not affect everybody right away or even for a long time...but it does catch up w/ you eventually. I abused my body nutritionally for a long, long time, even after I started learning about TF...now I am paying for it. I can empathize w/ all those ppl who say they've tried diets and exercise and it just didn't work. I know the key is eating a whole, nourishing and more traditional leaning diet.
post #52 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by leila1213 View Post
Here you go:
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/s...oryId=95900616

"Gut and Psychology Syndrome" is a good book to read about the role of gut flora in our overall health. Not sure to what extent it addresses weight gain or loss, as I haven't read that far yet.
That was really interesting. But, I'm a little confused. I thought if your body was unable to properly digest a certain food, say for example cheerios, it sits in your intestine and rots for awhile. This is what causes damage to your intestinal wall and how we develop a leaky gut and get bad things like yeast to run rampade in our system. And, this is why we should stay away from foods that our bodies' have a hard time digesting. Am I missing something? The NPR clip made it sound like if we don't have the right flora to digest a cheerio, the cheerio passes through and goes on it's merry way, no harm done.

Sorry, this was a little OT.

But, I do think consuming the *right* kinds of fats is essential to our health. DH is MUCH healthier since I convinced him to stop eating so many grains and up his fat intake (weight stayed about the same). I can't speak from personal experience about whether it helped me loose weight or not, because I have always been around the same weight (110 lbs, 5'4") and had always had really good cholestral levels (almost a one to one ratio of "good" fat and "bad" fat).
post #53 of 90
I agree that the mainstream scientific community is still missing the point. But at least they are starting to look at the role gut flora plays in our health. That's a start, right??!
post #54 of 90
What people don't mention is that your hormones play a large role in regulating your fat levels as well.... and guess what helps regulate hormones? fats.....
post #55 of 90
I don't think I can get on board with the grain hate. For one thing, a low carb diet affects your brain chemistry, your body needs carbs to manufacture seratonin, the neurotransmitter that makes us feel happy. There have been cases where low carb people have dieted themselves straight into a severe chemical depression. Seratonin is also essential to the chemical cocktail that is love.

For another thing, I can't think of a traditional food culture that didn't consume carbs and grain. Hunter-gatherer cultures in temperate wooded climates consume a lot of carbs in the form of roots, tubers, and mast (like acorns). Traditional cultures in desert, plains, steppes, or tundra where there's nothing apparent but animals to eat are nearly all recorded as having special dishes prepared from the contents of a slain herbivores stomach and intestines. That would be a kind of pre-digested carb, with lots of natural wild grains from the grass eaters. (Pre-digested isn't that yucky, that's essentially what fermenting is, right?)

I certainly don't think we should go overboard, but those carbs are the soluble fiber that cleans out anything that "sticks" in our system whether it's in the arteries or guts. I wouldn't want to go without.
--
AnnaArcturus
post #56 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnnaArcturus View Post
I don't think I can get on board with the grain hate. For one thing, a low carb diet affects your brain chemistry, your body needs carbs to manufacture seratonin, the neurotransmitter that makes us feel happy. There have been cases where low carb people have dieted themselves straight into a severe chemical depression. Seratonin is also essential to the chemical cocktail that is love.

For another thing, I can't think of a traditional food culture that didn't consume carbs and grain. Hunter-gatherer cultures in temperate wooded climates consume a lot of carbs in the form of roots, tubers, and mast (like acorns). Traditional cultures in desert, plains, steppes, or tundra where there's nothing apparent but animals to eat are nearly all recorded as having special dishes prepared from the contents of a slain herbivores stomach and intestines. That would be a kind of pre-digested carb, with lots of natural wild grains from the grass eaters. (Pre-digested isn't that yucky, that's essentially what fermenting is, right?)

I certainly don't think we should go overboard, but those carbs are the soluble fiber that cleans out anything that "sticks" in our system whether it's in the arteries or guts. I wouldn't want to go without.
--
AnnaArcturus
But low grain does not really mean low carb. You get tons of carbs from fruits and vegetables. I particularly love carrots and apricots, and bananas, and mmmmmmmm cherries.


I wonder if anyone has any comments about the issue of metabolizing good fats like VCO and OO after having the gallbladder removed. I know for many people that procedure is overused but I had gallstones lodged in my bile duct causing me excruciating agony and I was unable to even keep water down, so I had to have mine removed. I wonder if my body is able to get the nutrients it needs from the fats I am eating or if there is anything I can do to help the process.
post #57 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by cortsmommy View Post
But low grain does not really mean low carb. You get tons of carbs from fruits and vegetables. I particularly love carrots and apricots, and bananas, and mmmmmmmm cherries.


I wonder if anyone has any comments about the issue of metabolizing good fats like VCO and OO after having the gallbladder removed. I know for many people that procedure is overused but I had gallstones lodged in my bile duct causing me excruciating agony and I was unable to even keep water down, so I had to have mine removed. I wonder if my body is able to get the nutrients it needs from the fats I am eating or if there is anything I can do to help the process.
Good question, I've had my gallbladder out too.
post #58 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Missa View Post
Good question, I've had my gallbladder out too.
i've had mine out. i don't have problems with VCO, OO, tallow and lard. i do get pain when i eat them with grains.
post #59 of 90
yeah i can't really eat grains.. i am much healthier without them... but i get lots of carbs from fruit and stuff.... bananas, apricots etc.
post #60 of 90
For me, eating excessive amounts of fat makes me fat. Eating reasonable amounts of fat and I maintain a decent weight.
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