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AZ gardeners getting ready to plant?

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 
SO it is getting time for second plantings! I am getting ready to expand the garden and get busy putting in my winter/spring plants. Anyone else getting stuff in the ground? What have you had success with? I have visions of greens, peas, and much more!
post #2 of 25
I'd like to get another garden started this year, I just don't know where to start. I had a garden last year and everything died from the heat
post #3 of 25
Is it time to plant seeds in the ground? Would they be okay in the freeze (we have a freeze warning tonight). I'd love to get the garden ready. Last year I planted too late and most of it died.
post #4 of 25
this is my first year in AZ. what is good to plant, and wehn is the best time. i used to work on a farm in ireland, and the climate could hardly be more different!
post #5 of 25
I just found this link of what to plant and when in Phoenix!
http://www.desert-tropicals.com/calendar.html
post #6 of 25
Planting? Are you NUTS! We're into the second night of freeze warnings, and my lovely basil is about to die a cold and lonely death. It's all I could manage to plant, but it loves desert dirt and full sun if you get enough water to it.


BREMEN: Get a copy of the Sunset's Western Garden Book and check out everything you want to plant before you buy it ... nurseries will sell things that can't survive here. That book will save you a ton of money.
post #7 of 25
My dad, who is an experienced phx gardener says that right now is a good time to start some seeds indoors. Mainly tomatoes and peppers. I'm going to try to put some lettuce in the ground later next month and see what happens. My carrots from last year are hanging on believe it or not, frost warnings and all.
post #8 of 25
Yup, carrots overwinter well. I let some overwinter last year (we had a fair amount of snow last year), and picked most when the soil warmed back up and the leaves perked up again, and left two in the ground to go to seed. I've still got green carrot leafies under all the snow we've gotten this month (around 50 inches and counting I think?). So you should be good there.

If you plant your lettuce right now, the seeds will germinate in their own time when it's warm enough. I'd been hoping to get a few things planted this year before frost settled in, but the kids kept distracting me.
post #9 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by lmonter View Post
Yup, carrots overwinter well. I let some overwinter last year (we had a fair amount of snow last year), and picked most when the soil warmed back up and the leaves perked up again, and left two in the ground to go to seed. I've still got green carrot leafies under all the snow we've gotten this month (around 50 inches and counting I think?). So you should be good there.

If you plant your lettuce right now, the seeds will germinate in their own time when it's warm enough. I'd been hoping to get a few things planted this year before frost settled in, but the kids kept distracting me.
Cool! I will try to get some planted tomorrow (lettuce that is). I went ahead and set some asparagus roots into the ground since the package said they just go dormant in the winter. If they start to sprout I hope that covering them with sheets during the frost will help. I'm also going to try broccoli and brussels sprouts since they are cool weather plants. Let's see-- I know they are mostly fall plants but why not try? I just started my tomatoes and peppers indoors and will move them outside when it gets a lot warmer. I have a big sunny window they will be happy in front of until then. Last year I got too late of a start with those two plants. My dd planted some millet for her budgies, too.
post #10 of 25
Did you plant the asparagus roots or just leave 'em outside? I think planting them now wouldn't be too much different from me planting them in May up here... We had lows in the 30's still at that point... Just mulch 'em well so they're not fighting with weeds and call it good. I probably could've planted my crowns in March or April last year, but that pesky snow kept coming and I don't like planting in snow (just my own laziness).

But asparagus is a pretty hardy plant... Up here the spears pop up and are supposedly ready for harvest in May or so.

The broccoli should do well if it'll most likely mature before it gets really hot there (and bolt, which is actually kind of neat to watch how it sets seed!). Then harvest, wait for things to cool down a little, and do a second crop of it.
post #11 of 25
I got some things planted in late October. Garlic, peas, carrots, leaf lettuce, green onions, and cauliflower (I think). We covered it all Fri. and Sat. from the frost. I've had horrible luck with tomato seeds - they sprout, get an inch high, then keel over. But I'll try again along with peppers.

I just planted garlic cloves that I had received in my co-op basket. They've sprouted and are about 6-8" tall. Will they form a bulb good enough to eat or will I get some deformity?
post #12 of 25
Quote:
Did you plant the asparagus roots or just leave 'em outside? I think planting them now wouldn't be too much different from me planting them in May up here... We had lows in the 30's still at that point... Just mulch 'em well so they're not fighting with weeds and call it good. I probably could've planted my crowns in March or April last year, but that pesky snow kept coming and I don't like planting in snow (just my own laziness).

But asparagus is a pretty hardy plant... Up here the spears pop up and are supposedly ready for harvest in May or so.
I put them in the ground since some of them were already sprouting. I will cover them with dead leaves today to insulate, and plan to cover them up at night if they sprout any more between now and warmer weather.
post #13 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by tightwaderin View Post
I just planted garlic cloves that I had received in my co-op basket. They've sprouted and are about 6-8" tall. Will they form a bulb good enough to eat or will I get some deformity?
Unless they sprayed the garlic or have vastly different soil, you should be good. You took apart the cloves and planted pointy-side up, right?

If you do forget to water them a bit, the head will be a bit small, but still definitely edible. I had issues with elephant garlic and a few random cloves not bulbing up at all, last year, but I take it in stride since mother nature wants her own harvest, too.

The tomatoes... ah, to be able to direct seed them... Got a cat or neighborhood cats that may have taken down your seedlings?
post #14 of 25
I got my lettuce in and it's doing well, freezes and all. Our tomatoes leftover from summer finally died off, though!
post #15 of 25
Does anyone have some good desert gardening book suggestions? We container garden since we are renters and preparing beds in the yard would take a lot of work (and our landlord doesn't want major changes done). I had a tough time keeping things alive last year with the heat and most of the info I find online is geared toward people in cooler zones.

I know I want to plant:
tomatoes
zucchini
bell peppers
yellow squash
cucumbers
watermelon
cantelope

is there anything else veggie wise that grows well in the heat?

peas?
bush beans?
post #16 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by seeing_stars View Post
Does anyone have some good desert gardening book suggestions? We container garden since we are renters and preparing beds in the yard would take a lot of work (and our landlord doesn't want major changes done). I had a tough time keeping things alive last year with the heat and most of the info I find online is geared toward people in cooler zones.

I know I want to plant:
tomatoes
zucchini
bell peppers
yellow squash
cucumbers
watermelon
cantelope

is there anything else veggie wise that grows well in the heat?

peas?
bush beans?

I had very bad luck trying container gardening in the last couple of years. I think the pots get so hot that the roots get baked. I'm thinking maybe you should try to avoid having the pots themselves in direct sun, or only for a very brief time during the day. I saw on another website that it's best to use terra cotta pots because they will evaporate on the outside and keep the roots about 20 degrees cooler than the outside air. (I just used plastic pots.) I have also given up planting anything in pots in the front of our home, which faces south. It just gets too much heat.

My lettuce grew great last year in the heat! I had it in a semi-shaded place that only got sun for about 2 hours in the morning.
post #17 of 25
Thanks for the help, lmonter! Yep, took the cloves apart and pointy side up. They sprouted, so hopefully all will be well.

I planted the tomato seeds indoors to give them a good start. Obviously, it wasn't since I killed them.
post #18 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by seeing_stars View Post
is there anything else veggie wise that grows well in the heat?
peas?
bush beans?
Beans I think would do okay as long as you remember to water them and they maybe get partial shade.
Peas, probably not. I didn't get mine in as early as I'd wanted, and they still didn't do fabulous for me because they hit ripeness right as we had our three weeks of 90*F weather.

USAmma ~ You've got me beat with lettuce. *sigh* I swear, those suckers just go straight to seedling to bolting for me, so I'm going to play around with just flat out growing them in the shade and such this year.
post #19 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by seeing_stars View Post
Does anyone have some good desert gardening book suggestions? We container garden since we are renters and preparing beds in the yard would take a lot of work (and our landlord doesn't want major changes done). I had a tough time keeping things alive last year with the heat and most of the info I find online is geared toward people in cooler zones.

I know I want to plant:
tomatoes
zucchini
bell peppers
yellow squash
cucumbers
watermelon
cantelope

is there anything else veggie wise that grows well in the heat?

peas?
bush beans?

I plant all of those in the desert, but haven't had any luck with containers. I second the suggestion of using terra cotta pots and keeping them in the semi-shade for part of the day. we rent our house, too, but we put in a couple of raised beds and our landlord doesn't have a problem with it.
post #20 of 25
: My brocolli has sprouted! As well as brussels sprouts, and the millet seeds my dd planted for her birds.

Just had to share!
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