or Connect
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Mom › Parenting › Anyone Never Use a Stroller?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Anyone Never Use a Stroller? - Page 5

post #81 of 172
Jess, I live in NYC, we walk everywhere, and I never used a stroller until DS was well over 2. Eventually, my parents and others stopped saying anything.
post #82 of 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by soxthecatrules View Post
If you're really into babywearing and truly don't use a stroller often I guess a $10 stroller would be a good investment....just watch them really really close!!.
And when i was carrying my older son in a sling, when he was probably a year old or so...the ring BROKE, and had i not had one hand on him, he would have fallen out to the concrete sidewalk.

I would imagine the tipping of a stroller would be caused by hanging things on the umbrella handle that are too heavy...i've got a pretty big baby, so i can hang my purse and maybe a light bag on the handles and have it balance out, i've had it tip over a couple of times when i've taken him out, because his weight was no longer balancing what was hanging on the stroller, but he wasnt even in it.

Yes, you're right, its about watching them really close, no matter if they are in a sling, or a stroller, or toddling around.


Katherine
post #83 of 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by soxthecatrules View Post

With the exception of my jogging stroller (couldn't afford a BOB Revolution) I personally do not buy low end strollers. If you decide you need to use one on a regular basis spend a little more (Chicco, Peg Perego, Maclaren) and you'll probably be more satisfied. LOVE, LOVE, LOVE, my Peg strollers in the same manner some of you all LOVE your baby carriers. And, I do keep the babies facing me until they're 8 or 9 months old.
Also wanted to point out, that you arent "spending a little more" by buying high end strollers you are spending ALOT more....anywhere from $100-$500+ for a stroller. No thanks. I saw a Peg Perego plikko (??) at our local thrift store for twelve bucks, it was kind of dirty, went home and discovered this little umbrella stroller cost $200-300 new (omg), went back to buy it (so i could pretend i was rich ) but it was gone. Darn. Dont really see how the design is so radically different that it would be radically safer though.

And i read the link to the CNN article about strollers stunting development....what the article said was that if your baby spends hours facing away from you, you may talk to them less, and THAT causes the delays, and also that if the baby gets stressed at not seeing the parent, and the parent doesnt console the baby THAT causes delays. I can see those things happening when the baby is back carried as well, though....i tried a back carry a couple of times, and could not see my baby, couldnt interact with him at all. If your baby is fussing in a stroller and you dont go to him, then of course thats a problem. But i'm betting most moms here at MDC arent ignoring their crying babies no matter where that baby is. I talk to my son all the time when he's in his stroller.


Katherine
post #84 of 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by boatbaby View Post
DS is 4.5 and we never had a stroller. Went from sling to Ergo to walking. I LOVE that because he is used to it, he can walk long distances and we don't have to schlep some contraption when going to town, sight seeing, on vacation, etc.

He hiked 3.5 miles at age 4 in Hawaii at the volcano, straight down a mountain and then up again. No carrying, no complaints!

I think for older kids (3+) it's important for them to get used to using their own people power. Not enough kids in America (in my opinion) are used to walking normal distances or exercising. A mile and a half in to town at an easy pace should not be a big deal for a normal, healthy preschooler. I think when they get used to being pushed around like a sedentary piece of luggage that's doing them a disservice.

Ok, throw tomatoes now.

LOL I will throw my tomatoes now!

I one hundred percent agree with you. I don't believe in strollers myself. And I'm even more against them, especially for the reasons I stated above in my earlier post. Aside from my being blind, which would make me NOT at all want to push a stroller and put both myself and a child at risk, I feel that children can learn to walk. Many people here in this country are couch potatoes, accustom to microwave meals, and laziness. Kids and adults alike don't get the recommended amount of exercise, which leads to good health and a strong heart. (Of course, as you said, children who are not healthy would be excluded, as special arrangements would be made for them.) This could contribute to the obesity in our country. I've seen four year olds walk long distances. Also, I think about the children in other parts of the world. They do not have stroller luxury, hence they have to walk. This is the reason I advocate the leash or harness method when carrying is not feasible any longer.

Now, people can throw tomatoes at the both of us.
Have Fun! LOL
post #85 of 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by queenjane View Post
Also wanted to point out, that you arent "spending a little more" by buying high end strollers you are spending ALOT more....anywhere from $100-$500+ for a stroller. No thanks. I saw a Peg Perego plikko (??) at our local thrift store for twelve bucks, it was kind of dirty, went home and discovered this little umbrella stroller cost $200-300 new (omg), went back to buy it (so i could pretend i was rich ) but it was gone. Darn. Dont really see how the design is so radically different that it would be radically safer though.


Katherine
We went for a MacLaren. I needed a stroller I could get on and off subways while my son was, yes, walking beside me, but that would also still make it back from the grocery store or library okay (note: the basket is not that big, but it is pretty sturdy).

The difference between it and the cheap $20 stroller that we had inherited was: the handles were the right height for MY back, which is hugely important; the seat supported my son's back which was important to me too, and also reclined if he was napping in it, and the wheels were much better for going over snow and ice. The frame also survived a lot of abuse. Honestly it really was like night and day with the cheaper ones.

That said, if I were only using one at the zoo I wouldn't invest. But it is a HUGE difference in those particular models, I have to say.

If I'd only had the $20 stroller + Ergo I'd've given up, but then we would have missed out on so many urban adventures at particular ages (sort of the 20 months-2.5 age range; at 3.5 I have to say we haven't really broken a stroller out in a long, long time.) I was very, very happy to have both, and often used legs, carrier, and stroller in the same afternoon.

It really, really depends on your child and lifestyle. I think the OP should not get a stroller to make anyone else happy - but I would stay open to the idea and not get so bogged down in defending a stroller-less lifestyle that I then made my and my child's life difficult.
post #86 of 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by boatbaby View Post
DS is 4.5 and we never had a stroller. Went from sling to Ergo to walking. I LOVE that because he is used to it, he can walk long distances and we don't have to schlep some contraption when going to town, sight seeing, on vacation, etc.

He hiked 3.5 miles at age 4 in Hawaii at the volcano, straight down a mountain and then up again. No carrying, no complaints!

I think for older kids (3+) it's important for them to get used to using their own people power. Not enough kids in America (in my opinion) are used to walking normal distances or exercising. A mile and a half in to town at an easy pace should not be a big deal for a normal, healthy preschooler. I think when they get used to being pushed around like a sedentary piece of luggage that's doing them a disservice.

Ok, throw tomatoes now.

I'm glad that worked for you and your son. But every kids is different. My daughter gets plenty of exercise and is quite healthy. She just gets tired sometimes and it would be a disservice to her IMO if I just told her to suck it up because I have a baby to carry now and she just needs to deal.
post #87 of 172
I haven't read the whole thread because it's really long, though I'll probably go back and read it.

I didn't find the stroller useful when dd was a baby. It just took up too much space and she wanted to be held anyway. So we used baby carriers.

At some point she was heavier and seemed to like the stroller - when she was about 2? - and we used the stroller more. It was useful in, for instance, airports because she would happily sit there and play while we went around the airport rather than run off. I could have used a harness too, but she needed to be confined in some way in those situations. My daughter has always been very large for her age and was way at the top of the growth charts, so if she'd been smaller maybe we would have stopped using it later?
post #88 of 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by Deer Hunter View Post
I'Also, I think about the children in other parts of the world. They do not have stroller luxury, hence they have to walk.
But I do have the luxury of a stroller. Why shouldn't I take advantage of that? Lots of people in other parts of the world make do without a lot of the luxuries we have here like electricity or running water, but I'm not going to give those things up just because it is possible to survive without them. I have the means to live above just basic subsistence.
post #89 of 172
My first child we used the stroller for coats and stuff, not the kid. LOL but from the time he was 1 to 3 we didn't use a stroller even for stuff. I left the stroller behind with my ex.

With my second one we used one more for a crib when we went to a park or the pool. It was an extra set of hands.

For my third we used it a lot more. I had a sit and stand and could ferry my children on and off buses, to hospital, speach, et for the second child.

I do remember one time I wanted to smack a holier than thou baby slinger. My children were carried or slung 90% of the time but I needed spare hands. I was at the ENT with all three of my children. My baby was happy and content sitting in the stroller. I was cuddling my oldest dd, normal after doctor visit. I complemented the material of the sling, it was pretty. She got this attitude and said she only uses slings and would never use a stroller---She made me so mad. She was so condicending. She only had one child, plus a car. She wasn't going back and forth with 3 children by herself.

Yes, I have no problems with my content child to sit allone in a stroller while I cuddle or help the child needing medical care.
post #90 of 172
Yes it's true that in many places ppl don't have strollers, but strollers would be impractical anyway as there are not necessarily smoothly paved sidewalks either. In many places people carry children through toddlerhood when they cannot be expected to walk. Here we start wussing out (assuming a decent back I think it's kinda wussing out) when our babes hit 20 lbs, or before.

As for children and walking, I think that is impractical when walking is your main mode of getting around. Children dawdle, get distracted, etc. A stroller or carrier is important back up IMO if you get sick of smelling every single flower on your way to your destination.

I definitely think strollers have their place, but IME from carrying my babies on my back, I feel that some important primal need is met for them from that in a way that it never could be with a stroller. Both my children have just settled in to my back when carried, with my current babe it is a surefire cry stopper, I feel she is meant to be there and knows it. If she doesn't get up there for a day or even several hours, she gets fussy. Strollers are practical sometimes yes, but they feel much more artificial to me, kinda part of our 'babies in a bucket' trend and therefore should be used sparingly IMO. Also carriers serve in ways strollers just never ever could. For example we were at the hospital for my 5 year old this morning, I threw my babe up on my back and she fell asleep there, I was able to care for her and attend to and hold my bigger kid. I can also do chores, make supper, dishes, etc. much much more easily thanks to my carriers.
post #91 of 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marsupialmom View Post
She only had one child, plus a car.
Yes, having/not having a car makes a world of difference. I know some 'sling snob' folks too who drive everywhere and then put the babe in the carrier. Now that's cheatin'. A car is pretty much a stroller on wheels.
post #92 of 172
http://www.washingtonpost.com/ac2/wp...4654-2004May17

Older article, but interesting read for this debate.
post #93 of 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by boatbaby View Post
http://www.washingtonpost.com/ac2/wp...4654-2004May17

Older article, but interesting read for this debate.
So people in Kenya don't use them. I don't see what that has to do with anything.

The OP asked about people's personal experiences as far as needing a stroller, and some have stated that they can indeed be useful at times depending on circumstances. I don't think anyone here is advocating for sticking babies in strollers and not letting them out till they are 5.

You obviously have not had circumstances where you would have found one useful. Great. But I don't see the point in telling others who have that they are doing a disservice to their kids by turning them into sedentary pieces of luggage or aren't enough like the indigenous people of the world who are apparently so much more AP.
post #94 of 172
I agree - I really dont see the debate here - just people sharing their experiences. I think so long as strollers are used as tools and not as babysitters, or a place to dump your baby, or because you are lazy then they are fine. My not using one is not a judgment on those who do (though I may judge those who use them for the above mentioned purposes...)

To the mama who referred to my CNN article. In my short summary - I said that it had to do with the baby facing away from you - NOT from being in the stroller itself. And I agree, the same thing can happen in a back carry (or a front carry), I do believe, however, that it would be more common for a mom to talk or interact with baby in a back carry then a stroller facing away from you - but thats my opinion . I also think the interaction a baby gets from seeing the world from your perspective, and engaging in what you engage while being connected to you is beneficial developmentally. But thats all my speculation, and my experience.

Again, I dont think strollers are bad if used as tools. Just not constantly all the time, Im never holding my baby...lol
post #95 of 172
I don't use a stroller very often, but I do occasionally. Sometimes I have to with 2 kids when we're walking a long distance, or when we're somewhere like an amusement park or zoo. I also use one when I go to the mall, mostly to stuff all my bags in
post #96 of 172
We have never used a strolle,r but also havent used a carrier for about a year because I got pregnant and couldnt carry DS in it any longer. We have two strollers that we dont use, and a cart that attaches to my bike that can also be used as a stroller. I am kind of wondering if this will be a problem for us because we are wanting to go to a music festival this summer, 3 days of camping and thousands of people, and we want to bring ds, but he's at the stage where he wants to explore rather than hold hands, wont do a carrier anymore, never has been in a stroller. We are trying to tell him he needs to hold hands with one of us when we are somewhere where there is a lot of people, and then hopefully he'll be okay sitting in the bike cart since he's used to it, but we'll see.
Other than this we've never had any problem with him not being in a stroller... and this might turn out to not even be a problem
post #97 of 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by boatbaby View Post
http://www.washingtonpost.com/ac2/wp...4654-2004May17

Older article, but interesting read for this debate.
Well I do think this is an important reminder that a stroller is not a *given* parenting tool everywhere. Just here.
post #98 of 172
It is fallacious to compare the lives of urban mothers with those of their counterparts in rural, developing countries. Lifestyles are different, fitness levels are different. Besides, how do we know they wouldn't welcome the use of a stroller if it were affordable and lifestyle compatible? Their lives are hard.
post #99 of 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by seawind View Post
It is fallacious to compare the lives of urban mothers with those of their counterparts in rural, developing countries. Lifestyles are different, fitness levels are different. Besides, how do we know they wouldn't welcome the use of a stroller if it were affordable and lifestyle compatible? Their lives are hard.
It's just an interesting article and point of view. No more, no less.
post #100 of 172
The article illustrates the cultural POV regarding stroller usage. Sadly, too many people have seen the stroller being over-used and acting as a substitute for mother which tends to color the way they view it.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Parenting
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Mom › Parenting › Anyone Never Use a Stroller?