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Janaury 2009 Book Challenge - Page 13

post #241 of 365
Quote:
Originally Posted by becoming View Post
Is Prep a young adult book? If so, I was just looking at that at my library this afternoon. I came thisclose to getting it.
oooh...i had that one in my hands too. and i thought, can i check it out and pretend it is for someone else? these librarians know me too well...

i'm off to pick up a stack of books. maybe i can slip it in the middle?
post #242 of 365
#5 Chains (audio) - I didn't like the reader this time, and I'm afraid it might have ruined the book for me. It was highly rated and recommended, but I didn't love it.

#6 Tuesdays with Morrie - I grabbed the thinnest book on the shelf to read while I waited for my books to come in at the library; this was it. It will not be going back to the shelf. I'm not sure how it got on the shelf. I'll have to admit that books that pass on "great wisdom" are not for me. I found it to be trite and overly sentimental, not to mention there was nothing particularly wise in it. Perhaps a generation older than me would get more out of it, or if the eighties had just come to an end? Perhaps not.

#7 Tales of Beedle the Bard - A fun little book that didn't take long at all to read. I enjoyed Professor Dumbledores notes and getting to spend a little more time with him. I was even able to read three of the stories to my kids (6 and 3).
post #243 of 365
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jenifer76 View Post
Our Lady of the Forest by David Guterson

Ann Holmes is teenage runaway who is making a meager living picking mushrooms when she sees a vision of the Virgin Mary in an Oregon forest. I just couldn't get into this book. The author refuses to use quotation marks which made it hard for me to decipher statements from thoughts. The characters were all creepy. And the author fluctuated between bashing and promoting religion. All in all, just a strange, strange book that I am happy to be done with.
I read that book, and when I finished I couldnt decide if I liked it or not. I kinda liked the plot line, but the overall mood of the book made me feel kinda depressed, ykim?

Quote:
Originally Posted by cathe View Post
Starting an Adolescent Literature class this week and am supposed to read as much YA stuff as possible in a variety of genres.

The Plain Janes by Cecil Castellucci and Jim Rugg

Well, I love Castellucci's YA novels so I thought I'd try her graphic novel. I really enjoyed this and so did my dd. A teenager Jane moves from Metrocity to a small suburban town after a bomb goes off killing many people and her parents want to keep their daughter safe. At her new school, Jane ignores the popular kids who want to befriend her to find a more interesting group of kids. She discovers a group of misfits all named Jane. They eventually form a clandestine group, People Leaving Art In Neighborhoods (PLAIN), which puts the town in an uproar.
Oh I loved the Plain Janes graphic novels. I read those last year. Pretty good. Unfortunately, I heard that line of graphic novels, Minx I think? is no longer publishing. Boo.
post #244 of 365
Quote:
Originally Posted by fremontmama View Post
Oh I loved the Plain Janes graphic novels. I read those last year. Pretty good. Unfortunately, I heard that line of graphic novels, Minx I think? is no longer publishing. Boo.
Really? Bummer.
post #245 of 365
Quote:
Originally Posted by friendtoall View Post
#7 Tales of Beedle the Bard - A fun little book that didn't take long at all to read. I enjoyed Professor Dumbledores notes . . .
Ack! For my sake, and the sake of the 2 or 3 other people in the world who haven't yet read all the Harry Potter books, don't give away what happens! I just finished reading the 3rd Harry Potter book to DD, and I'm looking forward to reading the rest, and hoping not to find out too much ahead of time about what happens.
post #246 of 365
Quote:
Originally Posted by Daffodil View Post
Ack! For my sake, and the sake of the 2 or 3 other people in the world who haven't yet read all the Harry Potter books, don't give away what happens! I just finished reading the 3rd Harry Potter book to DD, and I'm looking forward to reading the rest, and hoping not to find out too much ahead of time about what happens.
OMG! I'm so sorry. I'm off to edit my post. I am sorry.
post #247 of 365
#6 - No Country For Old Men by Cormac McCarthy.

Hm. Well, it was a fast read and, in most places, a page-turner. I'm glad enough I read it, but didn't like it much. Some of it made me think, but more in terms of being glad that's not my own world view - all that decline, and inexorability, and no humanity. I didn't find it particularly upsetting, I just found it hard to care because McCarthy has so little interest in character. I think I like books by people who like people, and I suspect he doesn't, all that much.
post #248 of 365
Quote:
Originally Posted by friendtoall View Post
OMG! I'm so sorry. I'm off to edit my post. I am sorry.
It's okay, I'm not going to lose any sleep over it. I just like it better when I don't know what's going to happen. I was even slightly annoyed that the cover illustrations for the first 3 books were sort of spoilers for the plot climaxes.
post #249 of 365
Stories To Live By edited by Marjorie Vetter

I can't believe I found this book--my sister and I have been trying to find a copy for years. It was our favorite book when we were young teens. I must have read it 143 times--at least! It's short stories that had been published in American Girls Magazine back in the 60's--stories by Betty Cavanna and others. I loved it so much and it was fun to reread it. I'd love to see what teens these days would think of it. It was dated even when I read it. But many of the issues are still relevant--wanting to be popular, losing weight, honesty, dealing with parents, etc. BTW -- if anyone ever comes across a copy of this, my sister is totally jealous that I found this one and I'd love to find a copy for her.
post #250 of 365
The Secrets of Happily Married Women by Scot Haltzman, M.D.

This was pretty good . . . talked a lot of why men do certain things and are certain ways and if we (the wives) just accepted them and worked with those traits (rather than getting mad or resentful), we can have a happier and better marriage.
post #251 of 365
Prep is not a YA book, but it's about young adults. It wasn't marketed as YA, anyway. I remember liking it, and I think it's still around somewhere so I might even re-read it. I'm not reading anything right now, which is really strange for me.
post #252 of 365
9. The Glass Castle by Jeannette Walls

Jeannette Walls writes about her childhood growing up with an alcoholic (and probably bipolar) father and a self-absorbed mother. Her story is neither pretty or positive. Yet she never seemed to feel sorry for herself or wallow in misery. Lord knows I would have given the same circumstances. Some how despite the bleak circumstances in the book, you finish it still in a positive mood. Kudos to Walls.
post #253 of 365
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jenifer76 View Post
The Glass Wall by Jeannette Walls

Jeannette Walls writes about her childhood growing up with an alcoholic (and probably bipolar) father and a self-absorbed mother. Her story is neither pretty or positive. Yet she never seemed to feel sorry for herself or wallow in misery. Lord knows I would have given the same circumstances. Some how despite the bleak circumstances in the book, you finish it still in a positive mood. Kudos to Walls.
I think you mean The Glass Castle. I loved that book too!!! It was soo captivating and heartbreaking yet not totally depressing, a hard thing to pull off I think.
post #254 of 365
#8 - Empire Falls - Richard Russo
post #255 of 365
Quote:
Originally Posted by Leilamus View Post
I think you mean The Glass Castle. I loved that book too!!! It was soo captivating and heartbreaking yet not totally depressing, a hard thing to pull off I think.
Oops! Thanks for pointing out my typo. I must have been sitting on my brain.
post #256 of 365
Quote:
Originally Posted by SquishyBuggles View Post
#8 - Empire Falls - Richard Russo
Oh, I love his books! He cracks me up
post #257 of 365
Quote:
Originally Posted by fremontmama View Post
Oh, I love his books! He cracks me up
Me too, he's great!
post #258 of 365
I should be finished with my #3 tonight - Once On This Island. It's a young adult historical fiction book about the war of 1812 on Mackinac Island. I had picked it up a long time ago when we were on vacation. Good story so far (I should be finished by bedtime) and a fast read for sure!

Then I think I'm starting Twilight.
post #259 of 365
#9 The Boy in the Striped Pajamas by John Boyne

The young son of a Nazi soldier befriends a Jewish boy living on the other side of the fence near his house, in Auschwitz.
post #260 of 365
Quote:
Originally Posted by kaliki_kila View Post
#9 The Boy in the Striped Pajamas by John Boyne

The young son of a Nazi soldier befriends a Jewish boy living on the other side of the fence near his house, in Auschwitz.
What did you think of that? I know my partner read it and wasn't very impressed, and I recently read an article in the New York Times that mentioned it in discussing the increasing sentimentalization of the Holocaust.
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