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can't resell kids items? - Page 4

post #61 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by grniys View Post
Because that would make China unhappy and our government wants to bend over backwards to keep them happy.
Yes, also want to add Mexico to that list.

"If it is a one-of-a-kind product, those stores [consignment, thrift] will not need to test."

So, consignment shops are in the clear. That would not be the case for larger thrift stores that actually buy more than one-of-a-kind."

That is good news for ebay.
post #62 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2cutiekitties View Post
Yes, also want to add Mexico to that list.

"If it is a one-of-a-kind product, those stores [consignment, thrift] will not need to test."

So, consignment shops are in the clear. That would not be the case for larger thrift stores that actually buy more than one-of-a-kind."

That is good news for ebay.
I dunno, I just read this news article on my (old) local mom's board:

New Lead Law may Sink some children's Stores
post #63 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by Drummer's Wife View Post
I dunno, I just read this news article on my (old) local mom's board:

New Lead Law may Sink some children's Stores
Thanks for sharing that link.
post #64 of 132
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post #65 of 132
Can I ask a dumb question. There is a shop near my town that sells gently used kids clothing items (it is not Goodwill) so will they be out of business? I get 90 percent of my girls' clothing from there. The clothes are next to new and name brand too. Oh my gosh I think I am having an anxiety attack!
post #66 of 132
ugh! i always but used books! i wonder how this is going to effect my local store!
post #67 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by mytwogirls View Post
Can I ask a dumb question. There is a shop near my town that sells gently used kids clothing items (it is not Goodwill) so will they be out of business? I get 90 percent of my girls' clothing from there. The clothes are next to new and name brand too. Oh my gosh I think I am having an anxiety attack!
Not a dumb question.

Unless the law is changed and used clothes are exempted then yes, they will have to go out of business unless they're willing to pay to have each and every single item they sell tested. The fines for disobeying this law are incredibly expensive.
post #68 of 132
I just called our local for-profit resale where I buy ALL of our kids' clothes and this is real. Their corporate office is trying to get it clarified by their legislators.

They have already stopped buying. If they don't hear something positive in the next couple days they may be selling off all of their inventory. If nothing changes by the 17 of January they will be planning on closing all of their stores nationwide.

I will be calling and emailing my legislators.
post #69 of 132
So, I'm not very up on how I'd go about protesting this legislation, but I'd like to. Can anybody point me in the right direction -- specifically, websites I can go to, with activist information?

Thanks in advance.
post #70 of 132

re: retroactive and dumping product

Please watch this...(pt. 1 0f 3)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bUlY6zOMPqQ&NR=1

Also, as for the larger stores, they have known about this law for awhile. Wal-Mart specifically is only stocking compliant stuff, so don't expect a big dumping from them. It is all the rest of the businesses that have only found out in the last couple of months and/or have been trying to figure out how to comply that have tons of non-compliant stuff that will get dumped.
post #71 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by fruitfulmomma View Post
Wal-Mart specifically is only stocking compliant stuff, so don't expect a big dumping from them.
If they are only stocking compliant stuff, makes me wonder about some of the China recall stuff that they took off their shelves not too long ago.
post #72 of 132
"If they are only stocking compliant stuff, makes me wonder about some of the China recall stuff that they took off their shelves not too long ago."

Well, that is what they are claiming anyway... But I will say I believe this law has a loophole in it which will continue to allow these things to go on. The third party testing part of it, which goes into effect in August, has given *some* manufacturers the right to have third-party testing facilities on site *and* many of the approved third-party testers are in China. We are also all aware that these manufacturers were breaking laws already in place before this particular law. Hello??? Why should they comply now?!:
post #73 of 132
I have been reading the info and the pdfs at the CSPC website.

I have not found one that specifically mentions clothing, garments, or textiles. The language I have found is vague. The only language I have seen that looks like it applies to clothing (besides the specific document about shoes) are the "broad range of children's products" referred to in one document, "paint", and "small parts" referred to in a timetable.

I am wondering if perhaps clothing that does not have any small parts (ie buttons, snaps, zippers, decorations) or paint might be exempt ?

Of course if there are no resale stores left to buy it at, that won't help me.
post #74 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flor View Post
Here's mainstream media. Its LA Times and it says thrift stores will have to dump their stock of children's items:
http://www.latimes.com/business/la-f...,2083247.story
Holy crap!!!!!!!! I work for a kids resale franchise, and here I am reading all of these posts thinking that it must not apply to us because the owner of my store hasn't said anything. Then I open an article and the president of the freaking franchise says we will have to close. :

Also, we do not buy more than one of a kind. How it works is, say your daughter just went from size 3 to size 4. You bring in all of the size 3's and we buy them from you (outright, not on consignment). So either the president of the company misunderstood or we're mistaken about it not affecting resale and consignment.
post #75 of 132
Don't know if it will help but I just emailed my congressperson. Here is where you can find yours:

https://writerep.house.gov/writerep/welcome.shtml

Here is what I wrote:


Dear Congressman xxxx,

I am writing to ask you to please work to change the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act (CPSIA) to NOT be applied retroactively to children's clothing.

Existing children's clothing should be exempt from the CPSIA. There are both environmental and economic reasons for this.

There is going to be a large environmental impact from resale stores having to landfill their entire inventory of children's clothing. And since parents are not going to be able to donate or resell their children's existing clothing, it will also be landfilled.

Charitable thrift stores will lose the income they currently make from selling donated children's clothing. In addition to losing that income, they will have to bear the expense of disposing of children's garments left on their property which they can no longer sell.

Families who currently depend on being able to purchase their children's clothing used are going to have to bear the expense of purchasing brand new clothing. This will put a financial burden on many of our citizens who can least afford it. As a result, many of their children may not have clothing that fits well, is appropriate for the season, or is in good repair.

A great many for-profit resale stores will have to close, because they make most of their money from children's clothing, and if they can't sell it, they can't keep their doors open. Their employees will lose their jobs. Many charitable resale stores may have to close as well and lose their main source of income. And the communities of the for-profit resale stores will lose that sales tax revenue.

The risk of a child being injured by lead in their clothing is extremely small. If this regulation is imposed on existing children's clothing, it will do FAR MORE HARM THAN GOOD. In these tough economic times, this law will be increasing the cost of clothing for lower income families, causing local resale businesses to close, reducing local tax revenue, putting people out of work, and taking a large portion of income away from charities while increasing their operating expenses.

It would make much more sense to publish warnings about older children's clothing with metal charms and not enforce the CPSIA retroactively on existing clothing.

I thank you for your consideration.

Sincerely,
post #76 of 132
I deeply, hope that this does not go through. But if it does, i think it is imperative that we think creatively and out of the box. For example, every year my friend does a clothing swap with her girlfriends- we a (i'm talking about adults here, but easily applied to children). Our Waldorf school sets up a tent every spring and fall for the same purposes for children's clothing and shoes.

I would hope that everyone will not just throw up their hands and think that just because the government is cracking down, we all need to bow our heads and comply. There are ways around the system, and perhaps we will all be better off and pass things around rather than selling them!

i don't know, just a few tip of the iceberg thoughts.
post #77 of 132
At the bottom of the LA Times article, there's a button to post the article on your Facebook page.
post #78 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by fruitfulmomma View Post
Please watch this...(pt. 1 0f 3)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bUlY6zOMPqQ&NR=1

Also, as for the larger stores, they have known about this law for awhile. Wal-Mart specifically is only stocking compliant stuff, so don't expect a big dumping from them. It is all the rest of the businesses that have only found out in the last couple of months and/or have been trying to figure out how to comply that have tons of non-compliant stuff that will get dumped.
I've noticed a LOT more clearances on kids stuff than usual. At really, really low prices.

I'm assuming that is the way for them to get rid of non-compliant stuff in advance.
post #79 of 132
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post #80 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grylliade View Post
I just had a thought. Why can't this law apply only to imported toys and clothes? That would fix about 90-95% of the problem.
Because unfortunately, there are other raw materials (like paint) that may not be intended for use by children, but used to make children's products. The only way to guarantee that an item is free of harmful chemicals is to test the complete end product (or make ALL products lead free), because the raw materials can have orginated from anywhere. Am I making sense? I'm exhausted. If not I'll clarify tomorrow.


But honestly, this law as it currently stand is so incredibly problematic
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