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Every get tired of BF multiples misinformation? - Page 2

post #21 of 59
Jayme it seems REALLY overwhelming in your mind but when it happens....you just sort of figure it out. I know you've risen above great hardships in the past, and this will be no different. It's just like anything else--it seems really intimidating at first but once you learn the skills it's second nature.
post #22 of 59
The only planning I did for bfing twins was

A) ignore the advice from a close friend with twins who said that I'd have to supplement
B) buy no bottles (I have only 2 for catching pumped milk)... figured I could buy if needed
C) get the EZ2nurse pillow
D) a quick thought that if they were preemie I'd need other plans

After that quick think-through I decided I didn't even want to think about it as it was so overwhelming and figured that when they were born and I had to feed them it would happen and I'd have no choice but to deal with it!
post #23 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by MamaRabbit View Post
The only planning I did for bfing twins was

A) ignore the advice from a close friend with twins who said that I'd have to supplement
B) buy no bottles (I have only 2 for catching pumped milk)... figured I could buy if needed
C) get the EZ2nurse pillow
D) a quick thought that if they were preemie I'd need other plans

After that quick think-through I decided I didn't even want to think about it as it was so overwhelming and figured that when they were born and I had to feed them it would happen and I'd have no choice but to deal with it!
Good to know I'm on track. That's my plan now. No bottes, ordered my EZ2Nurse and ignoring bad advice.

Fingers crossed it all goes smoothly!
post #24 of 59
Thanks everyone for your support! I get so sick of hearing that I cant possibly nurse twins (but of course they think im nuts for nursing any of my kids). :

I know it will be quite an adjustment, but we will make it through. I REFUSE to bottlefeed. Im just trying to figure out in my head 'how' to feed twins at night and together.

I guess my question is how do you nurse at night and still get sleep? Can you nurse 2 infants while laying down and not having to sit up? I was thinking of nursing seperatly at night, but I dont know how much sleep I would get. My husband is really nervous about sleeping with 2 babes, so we have a crib next to our bed. I thought I would sleep with one at a time and then switch them for feedings. Does that sound logical?? How did you feed them at night while in the hospital? I always slept with them, even though the nurses gave me a bit of a fuss.
post #25 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by ~Mom2thhts~ View Post
I guess my question is how do you nurse at night and still get sleep? Can you nurse 2 infants while laying down and not having to sit up? I was thinking of nursing seperatly at night, but I dont know how much sleep I would get. My husband is really nervous about sleeping with 2 babes, so we have a crib next to our bed. I thought I would sleep with one at a time and then switch them for feedings. Does that sound logical?? How did you feed them at night while in the hospital? I always slept with them, even though the nurses gave me a bit of a fuss.
When my twins were first born I remember that when they'd wake at night I'd sit up in bed, put on the ez-2-nurse (I really only used it much in the very, very beginning) and my dh would help me get them on the pillow to nurse. I did wake them to nurse if they didn't wake themselves back then (again, in the very, very beginning) to help establish my milk, their weight gain, and to flush the jaundice. I don't think everyone does that or necessarily needs to do that though but I followed my mw's advice on that one. Anyway, it wasn't too long before I was nursing them one at a time at night. They'd seem to time waking up in a way that allowed me to rotate back and forth btwn them. This was my sleeping setup so I'd simply switch sides of the bed with dh during the night as needed. Nursing *any* baby all through the night doesn't give you much sleep. It is difficult (on the lack of sleep front) but I think so much better having them right there with me. I think I would have died if I had to put much more effort into night feeding than that. I know plenty of women sidecar a crib and rotate babies in and out and it seems to work well for them. It just wasn't something I needed or wanted to do. Once they got bigger (around 9-10 months) I stopped swaddling them and then slept between them (to keep them from waking each other initially) and found I was eventually able to nurse them while lying flat on my back by cradling one in each arm. That's when we got back to tandem nursing (I really didn't tandem much prior to that aside from the first few weeks). I can't speak to your question about nursing at night in the hospital as mine were born at home but I'm guessing you could probably do what you've done before only rotate the awake baby in & out as needed. Will your partner be able to spend the night in the room with you to help?
post #26 of 59
You can definitely do this!

For nights in the beginning I did have to sit up and use the pillow. One twin would wake to nurse, and I would wake the other and nurse them together. This continued only until I was able to lie down and nurse (just one baby at a time), which took me 8 weeks to learn how to do (but you may be able to do it much sooner since you've already nursed before). Once I was able to nurse one baby lying down, I'd lie in between the babies and just roll back and forth between them all night (NOT waking up the sleeping twin). That was heaven. It wasn't until 7 months that I was able to tandem nurse lying down, but even then I still preferred to nurse the babies one at a time in the night since I could not sleep through tandem nursing as easily (so stimulating! And stuck on my back). But it was great for nursing them to sleep for naps and bedtime.

We had a king-sized mattress on the floor, and it worked out well for co-sleeping. We are still sleeping with our twins, and our two-year-old, but now we have a king, queen, and full-size mattress, all smooshed together. It's quite dreamy.

Good luck!

Lex
post #27 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by ~Mom2thhts~ View Post
I guess my question is how do you nurse at night and still get sleep? Can you nurse 2 infants while laying down and not having to sit up? I was thinking of nursing seperatly at night, but I dont know how much sleep I would get. My husband is really nervous about sleeping with 2 babes, so we have a crib next to our bed. I thought I would sleep with one at a time and then switch them for feedings. Does that sound logical?? How did you feed them at night while in the hospital? I always slept with them, even though the nurses gave me a bit of a fuss.
In the hospital I nursed both babies together all the time. The nurses were very helpful in holding one baby until I was ready to get the other one latched on. I had an emergency c-section to birth my dd so had a lot more help from the nurses than I probably would have if the birth had been less traumatic. But I think you can still manage fine. I used the provided bassinet for sleeping. I don't think I would feel comfortable sleeping with both babies in that very high narrow hospital bed although I did one at a time.

Once home I nursed both babies in our bed at night. I think at first I kept them swaddled and on either side of me and just nursed whoever woke up. Baby ds woke multiple times and baby dd only a couple of times so I wasn't about to wake up baby dd unless I needed to . I quickly found a position that worked for me. I would lie on my one side and nurse baby ds in a side-lying position. Baby dd I would hold in a position above my body so she could access the top breast - kind of perpendicular across my chest area with a pillow alongside my back to help support my arm and her bottom. Kind of hard to describe. I kept this position all night so they could latch on whenever they wanted. Once they reached about 4-5 months baby dd became too heavy and I started to get sore from not changing positions at night so I switched to having them on either side of me and rolling back and forth between them. I don't wake one up if the other wakes up. I agree with 2+twins that it's going to be a little bit difficult on the sleep front anyways. I can't imagine having to do any more work than rolling back and forth let alone actually getting out of bed . But that's what works for us.

I will say that breastfeeding twins for me really has not been a whole lot more difficult than my singleton babies. I never really considered not nursing my twins (although I did briefly prepare myself in case I wasn't able to). It's just what I'm doing. Fortunately, I have never really had any nay sayers. Most people are pretty positive about it.
post #28 of 59
We started out tandem at every feeding for the first three months day and night. Then I didn't tandem at night for a long time (3m to 16m), It was easier to just roll over and nurse them. If they both wanted it right then then I would get them on the ez-2 nurse and go to town. I just kept the attitude that it couldn't be harder then El (and it wasn't) and that formula was not an option. They have had 7ccs of formula each and only by syringe because they dropped past the 10% weight loss mark and I wanted to bring them home ASAP (took longer for my milk to come in because I had a section. With my son it was in in 2 days with the twins it was 4 days!).
post #29 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2+twins View Post
I believe strongly that nursing is one of those things you just don't leave room for failure. If you let doubt hang around your mind then you're really increasing the chance that you'll feel like you *are* failing, whether or not that's even remotely the case.
I think this is great advice for any nursing mom.

nak - my sil didn't even attempt to pump or nurse for her trips. they said it was too much work, even when the babes were in the hospital and she was at home on leave. i don't have multiples, but i can't understand not even trying to get them some bm....
post #30 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by christyc View Post
Ugh.

I know someone who just a few weeks ago had the MD in charge of our local NICU tell her that in his experience, it (exclusive breastmilk) just doesn't work for twins and that if she didn't supplement with formula, the babies wouldn't grow.
Luckily I had the exact opposite experience. The neonatologist for my triplets absolutely, positively insisted that I nurse my 34 week triplets exclusively. When I expressed concern - I got the hugest lecture from this 60+ year old man. Me - in my post-partum triplet emotional mess - and all I can ever say to that man is "thank you". I wish I could find him to thank him personally. And I'm really glad to say most of the moms in my triplet moms group nurse their triplets - very successfully too!
post #31 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by ~Mom2thhts~ View Post
I guess my question is how do you nurse at night and still get sleep? Can you nurse 2 infants while laying down and not having to sit up? I was thinking of nursing seperatly at night, but I dont know how much sleep I would get. My husband is really nervous about sleeping with 2 babes, so we have a crib next to our bed. I thought I would sleep with one at a time and then switch them for feedings. Does that sound logical?? How did you feed them at night while in the hospital? I always slept with them, even though the nurses gave me a bit of a fuss.
When mine were infants I stacked them. Yup. I on my side, laying down, them stacked. Seems odd that it worked, but it did. If I did that now they would crush each other. I was too tired for the pillow.
post #32 of 59
Thanks everyone so much for your replies! It is so wonderful to come to this forum and get support and solid advice. I think I will try both tandem and rolling over to whichever twin is hungry, and see what seems to work the best. We are using the crib next to the bed because our bed isnt that big and my dh is afraid of rolling onto them. He said he will take the side off the crib to make it easier.

My concerns have now turned from nursing to time in the nicu. The nurse seemed to think today that since they would be 4 weeks early that they will need to stay at least 10 days. Today they nearly weighed 5lbs. I have 10 days to fatten them up more.I go next week for steroid shots. Im just in complete shock. This is not what I expected to hear. I thought they would be in nicu for just a few days and would come home with me. Today I was told that they most likely will be in nicu the entire time and they probably wont come home with me.

Sorry if I hijacked this thread : Ive had a hard day and needed to vent. Thanks for listening.....
post #33 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by ~Mom2thhts~ View Post
Thanks everyone so much for your replies! It is so wonderful to come to this forum and get support and solid advice. I think I will try both tandem and rolling over to whichever twin is hungry, and see what seems to work the best. We are using the crib next to the bed because our bed isnt that big and my dh is afraid of rolling onto them. He said he will take the side off the crib to make it easier.

My concerns have now turned from nursing to time in the nicu. The nurse seemed to think today that since they would be 4 weeks early that they will need to stay at least 10 days. Today they nearly weighed 5lbs. I have 10 days to fatten them up more.I go next week for steroid shots. Im just in complete shock. This is not what I expected to hear. I thought they would be in nicu for just a few days and would come home with me. Today I was told that they most likely will be in nicu the entire time and they probably wont come home with me.

Sorry if I hijacked this thread : Ive had a hard day and needed to vent. Thanks for listening.....
OK . . . .why will they necessarily be in the nicu at all? Sheesh - with those weights there is a good chance they won't be? My triplets were 5 lbs each at 34 weeks delivery and no nicu stay? IMHO - put this in the same bag as "its not possible to EBF multiples" -- bunch of bunk - it is definitely NOT a given that multiples will be in the nicu . . . . especially at those weights!
post #34 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by ~Mom2thhts~ View Post

My concerns have now turned from nursing to time in the nicu. The nurse seemed to think today that since they would be 4 weeks early that they will need to stay at least 10 days. Today they nearly weighed 5lbs. I have 10 days to fatten them up more.I go next week for steroid shots. Im just in complete shock. This is not what I expected to hear. I thought they would be in nicu for just a few days and would come home with me. Today I was told that they most likely will be in nicu the entire time and they probably wont come home with me.

Sorry if I hijacked this thread : Ive had a hard day and needed to vent. Thanks for listening.....
It sounds to me like the nurse is trying to keep your expectations very low, which is probably smart from her POV but not so great for yours. Most of the twins I know born at 35-36 weeks went home in a few days. All babies are different, but I wouldn't dwell too much on her 10-day forecast.
post #35 of 59
Thanks guys. That does make me feel better. I was thinking the same thing until yesterday. Then I saw these twin boys that were born at 36 weeks and they had been there for over a week. BUT they weighed what my babes weigh now and I have at least 10 days more to go, so that gives me hope.

Do you think if I pack on the protein in the next 10 days that they will gain more?
post #36 of 59
i love reading about all of your success stories... i really don't see how breastfeeding twins is going to be so terrible, but everyone thinks i'm crazy! i'm thinking it's actually going to be EASIER than bottle-feeding - i'd rather grab a baby and pull him into bed at night, than fumble into the kitchen, warm up a bottle, etc. to me, that sounds more difficult.
post #37 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by dividedsky View Post
i love reading about all of your success stories... i really don't see how breastfeeding twins is going to be so terrible, but everyone thinks i'm crazy! i'm thinking it's actually going to be EASIER than bottle-feeding - i'd rather grab a baby and pull him into bed at night, than fumble into the kitchen, warm up a bottle, etc. to me, that sounds more difficult.
AMEN to that!!! We had to bottle feed my milk to our twins when they were first born (4 weeks early and couldn't suck yet) and I HATED it. I remember thinking "why would anyone CHOOSE this?!?" while warming my milk in the middle of the night. It stunk. I much prefer to roll back and forth. At least I don't need to get up!
post #38 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by herdingkittens View Post
AMEN to that!!! We had to bottle feed my milk to our twins when they were first born (4 weeks early and couldn't suck yet) and I HATED it. I remember thinking "why would anyone CHOOSE this?!?" while warming my milk in the middle of the night. It stunk. I much prefer to roll back and forth. At least I don't need to get up!
How common is it to not have the sucking reflex? Without the sucking reflex how could they suck the bottle but not your breast?
post #39 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by ~Mom2thhts~ View Post
How common is it to not have the sucking reflex? Without the sucking reflex how could they suck the bottle but not your breast?
Not sure how common it is, but I was told by numerous people that preterm boy's sucking reflex tends to be weaker than preterm girls. Also, apparently if they are white, their sucking tends to be weaker. My twins are white boys. So, they had both.

It is not that they could not suck, but they their suck was weak. Too weak to get much milk from the breast. It is harder work for them to get milk frmo the breast than from the bottle. In the NICU, I would weigh them, then nurse them, then weigh them again to see how much they got. Then I would bottle feed them enough of my milk to make up the difference. Then I went to pump. It was quite the experience. I worked with a lactation consultant (who rocked, by the way! ) and she showed me how I could tell how good their suck was by watching their cheeks. When they sucked poorly, it looked like they were chomping.

They were 4 weeks early (they induced me) and the amazing thing is that when they hit their 40 week due date, they figured it out, and we said goodbye to bottles and pumping.

That being said, you may not have to do this. Mind you, I was induced, and should not have been, so they had these issues because they were too early. Now they are walking around and eating gobs of food and nursing like champs and are quite smart (in my motherly opinion! ). Everything worked out, thankfully. But don't worry about what might happen. I really don't think that there is anyway to prepare for the unknown except by just being ready to go with the flow and being ready to do whatever you need to do to take care of your babes. I spent a few weeks freaking out when I was pregnant because I went to a MOMs meeting and they all told me I was going to have a c-section and go straight to the NICU and be separated from my babies and bottle feed them formula, and on and on.....They all came from a fear based way of thinking and I started to worry. Turned out I delivered them vaginally, they were in the NICU for 10 days, but I was with them, and my the rest of my family stayed in the Ronald McDonald house across the street, adn it worked out fine. So, it was a bit of a balance, but you just do what you need to do.

I'll keep you in my prayers.
post #40 of 59
Mine were born at 37w5d and the smaller baby had weak suck reflexes. It took 3 weeks for her to be sucking well.
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