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Very very limited amount for groceries...wwyd? - Page 2

post #21 of 49
I agree with all the posts recommending little to no meat and dairy and heavy veggies and legumes. You can get lots of complete protein and nutrients for not a lot of money this way. I would encourage you also to find a vitamin C source within your budget (believe it or not even green peas are a good source). I buy one or two navel oranges and the family will get one half per day (or less).


HipGal- I was laughing out loud at your sig last week and shared it with dp. I love 2 year olds!
post #22 of 49
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post #23 of 49
I would check with your food shelf and see if there are other programs available such as the FARE program available in MN. ( Google FARE in MN to get more details of what I am talking about)
post #24 of 49
Has anyone ever volunteered at a soup kitchen or helping prepare meals on wheels or similar when they were in need of food themselves. I've never been in that situation, but I have volunteered at these types of organizations and there was always plenty of food I could have (and have) eaten also.

Just a thought.

Hope your situation improves quickly.
post #25 of 49
http://www.angelfoodministries.com/Default.asp?

They are evangelicals, and may give you religious literature, etc. There is a lot of red meat. If these two things don't bother you, this is a great program.
post #26 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Teensy View Post
Has anyone ever volunteered at a soup kitchen or helping prepare meals on wheels or similar when they were in need of food themselves. I've never been in that situation, but I have volunteered at these types of organizations and there was always plenty of food I could have (and have) eaten also.

Just a thought.

Hope your situation improves quickly.
That is honestly a lovely idea. :
post #27 of 49
angelfood ministries is good. The church that does it here is not "preachy" at all. They also have a committee that collects extra food to give out to the families who get the angelfood baskets, so you end up getting much much more than just what is provided by angelfood. I think that is a local thing, though.
post #28 of 49
When DH and I was living on $20-$25/wk for food, our list would look something like this:

2 lbs ground beef
1 loaf bread
lunch meat
butter
canned veggies
canned fruit
bananas
rice
ramen
mac and cheese
cereal
milk
Chicken (if it was on sale)

We had a lot of pasta based dishes since it was cheap and filled us up. It's not the healthiest on the planet but we tried with what little we had.
post #29 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Teensy View Post
Has anyone ever volunteered at a soup kitchen or helping prepare meals on wheels or similar when they were in need of food themselves. I've never been in that situation, but I have volunteered at these types of organizations and there was always plenty of food I could have (and have) eaten also.
I did this long ago when I was really broke. I started doing it because it seemed like the right thing to do, but then I realized they had plenty of food to serve and I could eat until I was stuffed, and also take home food that didn't get cooked that day but wouldn't last until the next meal.

It sure stretched out those ramen days!
post #30 of 49
Chicken legs can be really cheap.
post #31 of 49
Eggs, lentils, potatoes, pasta, frozen vegetables. Make lots of soups. Oatmeal, homemade bread. Sorry that's scattered, I was just typing things out as they came to me.
post #32 of 49
See if your library has the book "Not your mother's slow cooker cookbook"

It's got 500 pages of slow cooker recipes, and just the first 100 (that's as far as I've gotten so far) are chock full of cheap, filling recipes. (Cereal grain breakfasts, soups, stews, etc)
post #33 of 49
You've gotten great advice! I know fruit and veggies can be hard on a tight budget, especially fresh. Can you go grocery store to grocery store and talk to the produce manager about what they are going to throw out? If oranges are blemished you could still eat them or juice the, or veggies could be cooked for broth and veggie soup,etc.
post #34 of 49
I used to spend about $10/adult/week - eeek! so I know where you're comming from.
Brown rice and chicken are probably the cheapest healthy foods that I buy. Make stock from the chicken carcas, freeze if necessary to make it last till next payday. Use stock to cook rice to give it flavor and nutrition. I put butter or coconut oil into rice to make up for the lack of meat fats. If you are going to splurge on hamburger, then spaghetti is a pretty cheap meal, or I have made it meatless when we were poor. Mixed nuts are very very expensive but make a much more filling snack than chips or popcorn. I think boxed flake potatoes are cheaper (in bulk storebrand of course) than buying real potatoes and you can beef them up with stock and butter when you get tired of rice.

If you can get bread at an outlet store, it's cheaper than making it (IME) and for me
bread and butter sandwiches go a long way - and travel well. Somehow I don't get tired of butter - I have to get my fats.

My grandmother was a big time bread and butter sandwich eater. As a child I thought it was weird, my parents never fed us that, but as I have grown up I realize it may be what she ate during the depression. If you had a farm and cow already, it certainly seems better in the long run to eat the butter all year than to kill the cow once.
post #35 of 49
Everyone else has already offered great ideas. Here's a couple more I could think of:

-- use eggs all the ways mentioned, including egg salad. great on its own or for sandwiches.

-- bone-in chicken thighs are often at publix for $.59/lb. I ALWAYS stock up on these and end up getting 3-5 thighs per package for about $2.30. They are of a nice size, as well.

-- vegetable soup -- not expensive to make (I use 1 lb. ground beef, english peas, two cans of vegetable mix, green beans, carrots and potatoes -- canned since you're going cheaper -- and my husband, daughter and I can eat off it for 2 meals a day for 3 days, at LEAST.

-- you can get oatmeal at Wal-Mart in the big canister for $.97 and it last forever.

You'll make it through this tough time. Hugs!
post #36 of 49
Oatmeal, Ramen noodles, potatoes, dry beans, eggs, wonder bread, peanut butter.

Eggs can be hard boiled the night before to take for lunch. When you get sick of that, turn them into egg salad on wonderbread. Then pb sandwiches on wonderbread. Fried or scrambled eggs for dinner with a side of potatoes. Ramen noodles with beans for dinner. Oatmeal is pretty quick to make for any meal. I am sorry things are rough right now.
post #37 of 49
This is approximately what our budget is for two adults at this time. I'm not sure how much throwing another adult into the mix would change things...

The first items I make sure we have are meat and canned vegetables. As long as we have these items, there is always something to make for dinner and I always make sure to cook plenty for leftovers. My husband and I both eat a lot of leftovers for lunch. Easily microwaved. We do eat a lot pasta and tacos... these are cheap for us and make for good leftovers.

Chicken is something we always have... I think this was already mentioned, but whole chickens are pretty cheap. Around here, pork is also reasonably priced. Beef is only if it's on sale. Luckily, we live in a farming community which brings our price of meat down a little. It's always cheaper to buy more at one time. If you can plan ahead and take one week's worth to bulk up your meat supply, take the next week to bulk up on non-parishable items... you'll have several weeks worth of dinners you can cook.

I don't know if this is an option for you, but on weekends we usually eat with our parents. They enjoy the company and it gives us a break from cooking.

We always go with the off-brand cereals, but sometimes the sale prices on others are cheaper. Luckily, we get our milk for free (my BIL works for a dairy company nearby and is nice enough to share the free dairy products he brings home).
post #38 of 49
Also...if you have an Aldi's in your area, shop there! I saved almost 150.00 when I went there verses our normal chain in MN.
post #39 of 49

Coupons!

If you are on a tight grocery budget, I highly suggest coupon clipping. If you do it right, you can save a TON of money. I know a friend who spends about $30 a week on her groceries and saves about $50 a week just with coupons. Try visiting AFULLCUP.com. Its a coupon site that will really help you with how to get started with the clipping. Good luck!
post #40 of 49
You've had many excellent ideas posted!

We live on basically $20 a week for our family of 5. My husband is a trucker and gone most of the week, but my 3 young boys, 7 and down, eat well on the limited budget.

We do get some canned goods and a few cereals from a food bank once a month and WIC checks for one child, so that helps.

I agree with others on taking stock of what you actually have in the pantry and do "survival" cooking. You would be amazed at what you actually have in there!

Every 6 weeks or so we go to a butcher, where the meat is preservative/additive free and buy about $100 of various meats. Chops, chicken, hamburg. We freeze them in individual packets.

We check out sales and buy as much frozen veggies, canned tomatoes, pasta, potatoes, rice, eggs, garlic, onion as possible. We avoid buying any processed foods such as boxed mac & cheese and the like.

I will take 1/2 a chicken breast and cut it up into small pieces and make a stir fry or casserole so the meat lasts longer. We fill up on rice, which is a family staple, most nights. It's hard to remember, but a serving of meat is only 3 oz and we as a populace, usually eat too much.

I'll make a large meatloaf and use the left overs to make spaghetti sauce for a spaghetti feed the next night. I will make a double batch of pancakes or waffles to freeze for quick breakfasts.

Lots of recipes on the web to give you new ideas for stretching the food!


Good luck and know it is possible to eat relatively healthy on a tight budget!
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