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January/February Nurses and Student Nurses - Page 5

post #81 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by ollineeba View Post
Thanks. It was just so discouraging.. our instructor kept referring to bf'ing as "that choice" and it would be like "so if moms decide to make that choice- and it is a choice.. blah blah blah"

I knew it was going to be like this when I heard her say that babies will do just as well on formula as they will on breastmilk, that there is really no difference. (Really? I mean, really? What happened to evidence-based practice here?)

This woman has never had children, so I don't get the huge issue that she has with breastfeeding, but whatever.
I just need to get through it and bite my tongue. It's just sad to think that the other people in my class who have no parenting experience are taking her word as the written truth.
Oh, and she told us to tell our patients to cut up Kotex to put in their bras- because nursing pads have plastic backing. I use Lansinoh disposables and they don't have plastic at all--

There was one awesome woman in my class from last year- she also homebirthed, breastfed forever (lol), homeschooled, etc. But I had to take that year off, so I'm with a new class now.

Okay, I'll shut up now. But thanks, guys. It helps to know that you've experienced similar situations.
I think I'm really just going to try to keep my mouth shut for the rest of the semester.
I understand. I enjoyed my OB rotation in nursing school overall but I hated a lot of what I saw as well. One time this MD came in to do a circ on a baby boy and she used NO paid med on him at all and I told her (you bet I did! LOL!) that what she was doing was barbaric! LOL! She turned around to look at me with this look of "what the hell did you just say" and I just shrugged my shoulders.

One good thing is that almost ALL of the moms were breastfeeding, I think I saw one mom who choose not to. So that was cool, even if they just bf for a few days I'm cool with that! The nurses were really great with the moms and babies and very supportive of the laborting moms, it was just the whole medical/doctor management of it all I couldn't stand.

But anyways, you will meet a lot of people who have *very* strong feelings about breastfeeding, especially on this rotation.
post #82 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by ollineeba View Post
Okay, I'll shut up now. But thanks, guys. It helps to know that you've experienced similar situations.
I think I'm really just going to try to keep my mouth shut for the rest of the semester.
Oh, you'll try; but you won't be able to. I swore every damn day after class that *starting tomorrow* I was not going to say a word.

Oh well, I graduated and 6 months later was a midwife's assistant at an independent birthing center. You'll finish, too, and it will all be a vague dream.

Hang in there!
post #83 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by marilynmama View Post
I understand. I enjoyed my OB rotation in nursing school overall but I hated a lot of what I saw as well. One time this MD came in to do a circ on a baby boy and she used NO paid med on him at all and I told her (you bet I did! LOL!) that what she was doing was barbaric! LOL! She turned around to look at me with this look of "what the hell did you just say" and I just shrugged my shoulders.

One good thing is that almost ALL of the moms were breastfeeding, I think I saw one mom who choose not to. So that was cool, even if they just bf for a few days I'm cool with that! The nurses were really great with the moms and babies and very supportive of the laborting moms, it was just the whole medical/doctor management of it all I couldn't stand.

But anyways, you will meet a lot of people who have *very* strong feelings about breastfeeding, especially on this rotation.
Wow. Good for you for saying something. I don't even know what I would have done. I'm really hoping that nothing like that happens during my rotations.
I have six rotations at the hospital- 2x a week starting this week.
The good thing is that I really like my clinical instructor and I think she'll be great.
I understand we have to be supportive of all choices, but you can tell this professor was one of those nurses who just sabotaged so many breastfeeding mothers. It's sad.
post #84 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by lorijds View Post
Oh, you'll try; but you won't be able to. I swore every damn day after class that *starting tomorrow* I was not going to say a word.

Oh well, I graduated and 6 months later was a midwife's assistant at an independent birthing center. You'll finish, too, and it will all be a vague dream.

Hang in there!
Dream job! That's so neat!

I'm really going to try. I know it will be frustrating either way, but I just want to keep a low profile (maybe too late for that ) and get through the rest of my program.

P.S. 476 days until my May 2010 graduation. Not that I'm counting or anything
post #85 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by ollineeba View Post
Thanks. It was just so discouraging.. our instructor kept referring to bf'ing as "that choice" and it would be like "so if moms decide to make that choice- and it is a choice.. blah blah blah"
Ya know, I hate *hate* that attitude. It's also a choice whether or not to do crack, but that doesn't make choosing to do it a good idea, ya know? When that choice is taken away, it's good to have an appropriate substitute. But to deliberately choose an inferior substance, that's a whacky thing. You'll find that almost nothing in OB nursing or medicine is evidence-based. That's the only way that hospitals can maintain the status quo. It sucks to know that there's a better way to do things, but to have your hands tied and not be able to do it. No way could I ever go back to OB nursing. Ever.

And I have to say that I vaguely disagree with the idea of being supportive of all choices. I am not supportive of my post-MI patients continuing to smoke. Not supportive of the post-ops dragging themselves down to the cafeteria for burgers and fries when they don't want to eat their "heart healthy" diets. Not supportive of my dialysis patients who decide to go on a potato-chip-and-watermelon binge. And I'm not supportive of women who choose to feed artificial substances without having *all* the information. They need to make *informed* choices and when a nurse is telling them that formula is just as good and twice as convenient, she is guilty of malpractice IMNSHO. Yup, can't be an OB nurse. BTDT.
post #86 of 95
Yeah, after the commute to the birth center got to be too much, I went to work in our local hospital. I worked for 3 years on the medical floor before deciding to go to OB/mother/baby; that worked out for about 6 months. I now am back on the medical floor and I *love* it.

I can't do OB in a hospital. If I'm going to be doing a lot of interventions, I want to do them on people who need them. That's one reason I really like the medical floor. I also find it more challenging and faster paced.

So I'm with Turkish Kate; can't do OB, BTDT, not going to do it again. I just felt too compromised the entire time I was there.
post #87 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by lorijds View Post
Yeah, after the commute to the birth center got to be too much, I went to work in our local hospital. I worked for 3 years on the medical floor before deciding to go to OB/mother/baby; that worked out for about 6 months. I now am back on the medical floor and I *love* it.

I can't do OB in a hospital. If I'm going to be doing a lot of interventions, I want to do them on people who need them. That's one reason I really like the medical floor. I also find it more challenging and faster paced.

So I'm with Turkish Kate; can't do OB, BTDT, not going to do it again. I just felt too compromised the entire time I was there.
Good point.. I think because of those reasons I would prefer the postpartum part of LDRP.


I helped a new mother to breastfeed today, and the feeling was *amazing* when I helped her to get the baby latched on for the first time. The mother beamed and her husband was just in awe of her & so supportive..
It was truly a dreamy day. So wonderful.
Now to talk to them about the circ they have planned for tomorrow. Ugh.
post #88 of 95
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post #89 of 95
Just wanted to update on my new job.

All I can say is I am SO GLAD I am out of the hospital my new job is GREAT! You couldn't pay me enough to go back to the hospital.

I really like the patient (all teenage boys...lol) and the low stress of it all. I am sleeping better, have more enjoyable time with my family, and am thinking about going back for my masters (maybe...). I just feel like I can breathe a sigh of relief.

Anyone have a masters in nursing? If so what type and what do you do? I'm just trying to decide if the money I invest in a masters program will be worth it..
post #90 of 95
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20090215/...rsing_shortage

This is a great article I just saw on yahoo about new nurses and how they are basically just thrown to the wolves---and one of the reasons so many leave the field entirely within a few years. I remember when I was in the ICU feeling this way a lot. I can totally relate to this article.
post #91 of 95
That's a good article... I had that "thrown to the wolves" feeling in my first job as a new nurse, even though it had a 12-week orientation. I remember one night during orientation, being so afraid that my little patient was going to die because all the experienced nurses were so into watching the summer Olympics on TV that they didn't want to help me. He did survive, and I survived the orientation, but I only stuck it out for 3 months afterward.

Now I am back at the little hospital I worked at as a student nurse. The atmosphere is *so* different, and I'm so relieved to be back. Even though we're very busy at work right now (general peds unit in RSV season), every single one of my coworkers is willing to answer questions, and to help me out any time I ask, rather than rolling their eyes at me for not magically knowing everything. They are so wonderful.

Hooray for those who support new nurses in their learning!
post #92 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by marilynmama View Post
Just wanted to update on my new job.

All I can say is I am SO GLAD I am out of the hospital my new job is GREAT! You couldn't pay me enough to go back to the hospital.

I really like the patient (all teenage boys...lol) and the low stress of it all. I am sleeping better, have more enjoyable time with my family, and am thinking about going back for my masters (maybe...). I just feel like I can breathe a sigh of relief.

Anyone have a masters in nursing? If so what type and what do you do? I'm just trying to decide if the money I invest in a masters program will be worth it..
Congratulations! I'm so glad you like your new position. What relief it must be to find the right fit for you.
post #93 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by Turkish Kate View Post
And I have to say that I vaguely disagree with the idea of being supportive of all choices. I am not supportive of my post-MI patients continuing to smoke. Not supportive of the post-ops dragging themselves down to the cafeteria for burgers and fries when they don't want to eat their "heart healthy" diets. Not supportive of my dialysis patients who decide to go on a potato-chip-and-watermelon binge. And I'm not supportive of women who choose to feed artificial substances without having *all* the information. They need to make *informed* choices and when a nurse is telling them that formula is just as good and twice as convenient, she is guilty of malpractice IMNSHO. Yup, can't be an OB nurse. BTDT.
I get a lot of train wreck patients who come to us, get better and go right back to their unhealthy lifestyle. As far as I'm concerned, if they have all the info (smoking is bad, maintain a healthy diet so you can live longer, ect) then they are free to do further damage to their health. I can try to curb them "I'd rather you not go out to smoke, do you want to try a nicotine patch?" but grown adults are grown adults and they are free to do what they choose as long as it's legal. I figure they are paying the price with the consequences (MI, COPD, renal failure). Adults are not going to change unless they want to. It may take an MI with a triple bypass but I can't force people to change. I can only offer information, alternatives and resources.

This is where I feel the "supporting the patient" comes in too play. You aren't gonna get someone to re-evaluate their life and accept change angry and resentful of their choices. Support them, educate them, be open to their feelings and respect the wishes of a grown, mentally competent adult.
post #94 of 95
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post #95 of 95
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