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Seed Starting Sticky! Please post your questions and answers here! - Page 2

post #21 of 111
I'd hazard a guess that Baker Creek had a giant flood of orders right after their new catalog came out. Last year I think I got orders from them within a week or so, but the economy hadn't tanked as much at that point...
post #22 of 111
stuck
post #23 of 111
Blooming, the order that I placed on January 1 came on January 15. So not quite 3-7 business days but still not too bad. And I got freebies!
post #24 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by FarmerCathy View Post
Veggies: Tomatoes, peppers, eggplant, broccoli,

Veggies that don't have to be, but I do anyway: basil, onion,

Flowers so they will bloom the same year: sweet william, rudbeckia, snapdragon and to give them a head start butterfly bush, ageratum, gomphrena, and celosia. Just in case you wanted to know.

Please anyone add to my list, I know its not complete, but I can't think.

Yes, regular flourescents will work just fine.
I live in zone 9. I am thinking I might need to plant my seeds in the garden instead of start them indoors--heirloomseeds.com has a 28 wait on the orders right now-yikes! Anyone had good luck starting broccoli in the garden, from seed? Or should I just wait until the next cold season? Any ideas?
post #25 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jennifer3141 View Post
Blooming, the order that I placed on January 1 came on January 15. So not quite 3-7 business days but still not too bad. And I got freebies!
Thanks Jennifer, I'm glad you got your seeds. I can't wait to get my hands on those little packages! Hopefully they'll show up soon.

Yesterday DH ordered a shelf to start the seeds on. We deceided to go with a shelf that was semi-attractive as the seeds are going to have to live either in the living room or our bedroom. We figured we could bring it down in the basement to store the produce we can for the fall, winter...

Next stop...lights!

Oh what do others planr their seeds in? Do I really have to buy little plastic cells? The one thing I know is that I don't want to use the ones that break down. We have never had a good realtionship. Thanks!
post #26 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blooming View Post
Oh what do others plant their seeds in? Do I really have to buy little plastic cells? The one thing I know is that I don't want to use the ones that break down. We have never had a good relationship. Thanks!
Do you have a friend at the farmer's market or a local nursery? They can't reuse those 4" pots that you can fit like 18 of in an 11x22" flat. I've gotten lots of groovy and multi-sized square and round pots from my tomato lady - she can't reuse them, and was just going to toss them. I need to go see her this year (last year I was a bit too waddly) and maybe get my hands on some more...

I am lazy and don't really do much besides shake out what I can from the used pots, but I haven't had any weird fungus or mold problems from the pots (now I did get green mold from seed-starting mix that stayed too damp, but that's a whole different problem).

Or I know my lavender lady has something like cocoa fiber or rice pots or something - they're brown, rigid, durable, and will apparently eventually break down/compost at some point. She only had them in rounds though - not as efficient as squares for me. And they're pricey.
post #27 of 111
Do you really need seed-starting soil?

Do you transfer your seed-starting soil into the garden or remove just the plant and root systemto the garden?
post #28 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by eirual View Post
Do you really need seed-starting soil?

Do you transfer your seed-starting soil into the garden or remove just the plant and root system to the garden?
Depends, and all of it goes in.

Last year I used the Black Gold seedling mix, and wasn't impressed. It stayed too wet to where I even had a little mold type problem. I was happier with my homemade stuff, which wasn't too difficult. I used compost, some fluffed up peat moss and a handful or two of vermiculite for a 4-5 gallon bucket of homemade seed starting mix. And just mixed and added until I got the light fluffy consistency that I wanted.

When I plant stuff, I flip out the plant (upside down), shake loose the roots in case they've done that little root-bound thing on the edges, plant, and then I use the seed starting mix on top of the garden soil. Gives me a little edge on the weeds (like an extra day or seven before weeds germinate through the new soil), and adding more stuff to the garden isn't a bad thing.
post #29 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by lmonter View Post
Do you have a friend at the farmer's market or a local nursery? They can't reuse those 4" pots that you can fit like 18 of in an 11x22" flat. I've gotten lots of groovy and multi-sized square and round pots from my tomato lady - she can't reuse them, and was just going to toss them. I need to go see her this year (last year I was a bit too waddly) and maybe get my hands on some more...

I am lazy and don't really do much besides shake out what I can from the used pots, but I haven't had any weird fungus or mold problems from the pots (now I did get green mold from seed-starting mix that stayed too damp, but that's a whole different problem).

Or I know my lavender lady has something like cocoa fiber or rice pots or something - they're brown, rigid, durable, and will apparently eventually break down/compost at some point. She only had them in rounds though - not as efficient as squares for me. And they're pricey.

Thanks lmonter, I don't think I have someone to get free pots from. I think I mught end up ordering flats.

Or perhaps I will just save every container I can get my hands on. Anyone tried yogurt containers?
post #30 of 111
How productive (or whatever) are old seeds? I have some from 2005, is it worth it to plant them?

As a newbie, how do you pick which variety? There are so many kinds of tomatoes, peppers, corn, etc. And having no real experience with any, I have no idea which to choose or which company to get them from.

TIA
post #31 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blooming View Post
Or perhaps I will just save every container I can get my hands on. Anyone tried yogurt containers?
I get the flats that the pots go in from Lowe's for about $.97/each ($3-$4/ea at Fred Meyer!), and just poke around for 4" pots... you'll find an okay deal somewhere as long as the shipping doesn't get you.

Um, I wouldn't do yogurt containers. Or decapitated milk jugs, sour cream containers, etc. I did it two years ago, and it was heartbreaking. The roots stick to the plastic on all those (at least all the containers I had, and it was a variety), and it takes a while for the plant to regrow half their roots. Unless maybe you spray down the inside with vegetable oil before filling with dirt, but I don't know if it'd last or work or anything. Plus I had to get in the containers with a spoon or knife because my containers were more rigid than flexible - the flexibility is important when you're squishing the sides to get all the root and dirt out in one piece (relatively) rather than leaving the roots in the container away from the stem of the plant.



Quote:
Originally Posted by allielb View Post
How productive (or whatever) are old seeds? I have some from 2005, is it worth it to plant them?

As a newbie, how do you pick which variety? There are so many kinds of tomatoes, peppers, corn, etc. And having no real experience with any, I have no idea which to choose or which company to get them from.
The germination will be lower for seeds from 2005 than seeds from 2008, but unless they're onions or onion related, you should get at least some germination.

I'm still experimenting with different varieties of things. I think your best bet would be go with things that'll mature in your zone. I got the Irish Eyes catalog today, and they have a 40 day tomato! I am so getting one of those packets.
post #32 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by lmonter View Post

I'm still experimenting with different varieties of things. I think your best bet would be go with things that'll mature in your zone. I got the Irish Eyes catalog today, and they have a 40 day tomato! I am so getting one of those packets.
Wow, 40 days! I might have to get one too. I think I will try to get most of my seeds from Territorial, because they are local. They sent me a list of seeds they get from Monsanto, so I can stay away from those. Then if there is anything I really want (like 40 day tomatoes) I get those elsewhere.
post #33 of 111
My seeds came today! IT felt like a holiday. I'm so excited. I love the little packages and I can't wait to try out the freebees.

So now the question is how should I store them?
post #34 of 111
I have mine is a drawer, Blooming. But you're probably right about storage. The refrigerator?
post #35 of 111
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post #36 of 111
What type of heating pad do I use to start seeds indoors - and how high/long do I have it on each day?
post #37 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by notwonamesalike View Post
What type of heating pad do I use to start seeds indoors - and how high/long do I have it on each day?

I've heard conflicting things about Baker seeds as of late - so we're getting ready to place an order with Heirloom Seeds.
What did you hear about Baker Creek? Fill in the clueless.

I just use an old, weird looking electric heating pad that was probably $8-$10 from Walmart a decade ago. It does have a scratchy-cloth-like cover on it though. I plug it in to my surge protector down there where I start my seeds. The lights and heater are on a timer - 12 hours on, 12 hours off, sometimes we go up to 14 hours on.

I only plug in the heating pad until my peppers and tomatoes have mostly germinated, then put it aside. I use my turkey thermometer to check the temp in the very middle of the flat (the part that gets the warmest). If the soil goes above 88-90*F, I turn off the heating pad for a little bit. I think it's usually on low or medium heat though - I'll find out again in a few months.
post #38 of 111
is it actually necessary to use a heating pad? i need to start some of my cold-weather stuff but i've never heard of a heating pad for seeds before (then again, this is only my 2nd year gardening ).
post #39 of 111
I've also read that the top of the fridge is the perfect temp for starting tomatoes.
post #40 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by lmonter View Post
What did you hear about Baker Creek? Fill in the clueless.


I edited my post to remove that comment as I don't want to spread misinformation. I had looked at so many seed companies trying to decide who we were going to use that I got them mixed up in my head. Sorry. I only heard GOOD things about Baker Creek.
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