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Spring babies and gardens! - Page 2

post #21 of 56
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by HydeParkB View Post

If it's in the budget, I love soaker hoses - they make watering much easier.
DH got me one of these for my birthday! He's great! we use recycled water (washer) and if anyone else wants to try this FILTER THE WATER THROUGH STOCKINGS. I learned the hard way. :
post #22 of 56
I'm in ne ohio, and due may 20! My first baby came 9 days after my due date, so I'm kinda expecting something like that to happen again. I usually need to get my seeds started by st. patricks day (mid march) and I get everything in the ground a little after memorial day (end of may). Getting my seeds started won't be a problem, but I'm either going to be in labor around the day I need to get my plants in the ground, or I'm going to be less than a week postpartum! I think I'm going to do what an above poster said, and I'm going to map out exactly what plants I want where, and then hand it off to someone else. This year it just isn't going to be possible for me to plant by myself. My mom and grandma live around the corner, plus I have a brother and sister who would be able to help too.
post #23 of 56
Thread Starter 
amnda527: My SIL is pregs and due right with both of us and lives in Clevland! I'm going to try and go up there once LO is born so we can see the family blah blah.. Keep in touch and we can plan something!

Do you ever stop by the may DDC? I can't remember, preggo brain!
post #24 of 56
Gardening wasn't a problem while pregnant for me but after DD arrived it was really difficult to step outside, much less get anything done. Friends would come hold her while I started seeds/transplanted/etc. but I never quite got on top of things...I was worried about nursing, too, I was dirty while gardening and felt the need to shower before nursing, she'd get hungry, etc. It was much, much harder than I anticipated and I got just about ZERO done on my four month leave...I don't think we functioned outside of snuggling in bed for the first month! It really caught me by surprise as I expected to pick up where I left off!
While really productive, my garden was much, much smaller than normal last year and I didn't do any hobby growing, salvias, etc., just veggies.

This year is feeling good, though, no newborn and I'm not pregnant so I'm being ambitious! If you can get most of it started before your babe arrives, you'll be in better shape than I was! Good luck!
post #25 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluebird9 View Post
I have this totall fantasy of the baby hanging out and napping (yeah I wish.... hee) while I garden, and when she learns to crawl playing in the dirt with her and showing her bugs, veggies and flowers.
I got to live this fantasy with my July06 babe. I'm due early June this round and am plannning the same garden I did last year. Actually a wee bit bigger since I'm trying my hand at growing our own chicken forage blend. We added chickens last fall to our (read: my) chore list, so that will be extra over last time too. The step stool is a total necessity, as is a good wrap. I know there are rare babies out there who don't enjoy being worn and I'm hoping I don't have to experience that, but my son was completely content as long as he was pressed against my body. My garden is my place of zen, so being out there was paramount to surviving difficult early breastfeeding and world-rocking in general. If the garden is your salvation, grow it! If it is just a chore, be minimal about it. That's my advice

I have to say watching my babe crawl around in the mud and dirt was fabulous. He loves his veggies and I credit much of that to the fact we plant, water, feed, and harvest together. I can't say enough good things about gardening with a kiddo. (I can also say that sometimes it is FRUSTRATING! )
post #26 of 56
That sounds awesome Erinz, I have more of a carrier than a sling/wrap and I'm hoping it has the same sort of effect on my daughter. What kind of sling do you have?
post #27 of 56
Last year I started all my usual seeds plus a bunch of new flowers I hadn't tried before. I put as much as I could in the ground before the baby came, but the majority of my garden HAD to go in the week after he was born my midwife stressed to me - "No Squatting!!" but I did when I was feeling fine, and I regretted it the next day. Now the neighbors didn't put their garden in for another 3 weeks, but they had more troubles with late frost and such. Plus they don't do raised beds so their soil wasn't warm enough when I was putting mine in.

Next time I'd plan not to have a baby between May 15th and June 15th
post #28 of 56
Just thought I'd add that once DS2 was on the outside, he was quite content to lay on a blanket or in his bucket seat while I gardened. Sometime's he'd sleep, sometimes he'd just amuse himself. And when he needed to be nursed, I wasn't too concerned about dirt on my hands - it's just dirt...not germs And having raised beds also helps with the kids, when DS1 was crawling the summer before, he wasn't nearly as likely to crawl UP and INTO the raised beds. So he could play and crawl around without getting into my plants.
He also benefitted from helping me harvest, he was happy to munch on fresh picked beans or sample fresh peas. And this past year, rolling a pumpkin around the lawn was good for a half hour of free entertainment!
post #29 of 56
Oooh, me, me! Dropping out of lurk to join in. I'm due in very late May, which means at the tail end of my spring planting season. I'm hoping I don't go before my EDD, because I really, really need to get everything planted this year. Fall crops will depend entirely on the new babe's temperment. I know with my first DS, I would never had gotten any gardening done (we lived in a basement apartment, so it was a moot point).

Anyway, since I know I won't have the time/energy/desire to do a LOT of processing/canning, I'm focusing on a few lowish-maintenance fresh veggies and putting in some long-term benefit perennials. I intend to plant a lot of berries and fruits this year, which means in 2-3 years I'll be getting bumper crops if I prep right and take good care of it all.

My plan so far:

3 tomato plants -- cherry, slicing, and salsa
4 pepper plants -- 2 bell, 2 hot
5 lbs potatoes -- red skinned variety
8-10 dozen onions -- red and Walla Walla (started from seeds yesterday)
Carrots -- 3 varieties, as many as I can plant
Parsnip -- half-long variety
Radishes -- 2 varieties
Peas -- 1 edible podded, 1 early shell
Dwarf Pak Choi
Spinach
Rainbow Swiss Chard
Lettuce -- 3 varieties loose leaf
Cucumbers -- in hanging pots
Black Zucchini
Yellow Straightneck Summer Squash

Any volunteers that come up in my compost pile, or from last year's garden. I might even get a sugar pie pumpkin hill from the one that got left to rot.

Raspberries -- 3 Black Jewel, 10 Heritage Red
Blueberries -- 4+ bushes, undecided on variety
Everbearing strawberries -- Tribute variety
3 Rhubarb crowns, plus starting my own from seed
Gooseberry, red currant, and/or sand plum
Other perennials which I can't seem to think of just now
post #30 of 56
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dagny.galt View Post
3 Rhubarb crowns, plus starting my own from seed
man. Have you ever grown rhubarb before? I could only imagine starting it from seed! I've had crown in for 4 years now and last year was the first year that I felt comfortable harvesting.

Am I doing something wrong? Should I be fertilizing? I've always herd that they grow like weeds in our climite.
post #31 of 56
Im due in may with our first...
our hope is that we will just start all our seeds in march, and put in our raised beds in march. since we can't plant till the end of may really ( i think... i could be wrong) dh will just put all the little baby plants into place. and the potatoes... and the sweet potatoes.. ok. it might not go as smooth as that.
hopefully this babe will come early in may.. and not at the end.
post #32 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by kriket View Post
man. Have you ever grown rhubarb before? I could only imagine starting it from seed! I've had crown in for 4 years now and last year was the first year that I felt comfortable harvesting.

Am I doing something wrong? Should I be fertilizing? I've always herd that they grow like weeds in our climite.
I've never grown it before now, but I love homemade strawberry-rhubarb jam, so I'm going to start with a few purchased crowns. The self-started crowns are going to be a bit of a gamble, but they're a variety I can't get around here. If they're a loss, well, I'll know better next time, kwim?

I'm in zone 6 (6a, I believe) and I've always heard that rhubarb grows really well around here as long as the soil is good (loamy & well-drained). Since mine is currently mostly clay, I'll be working in a LOT of organic matter. I believe you're supposed to fertilize the crowns in the early spring before they begin growing much. I've also seen suggestions for fertilizing with something nitrogen-rich after the harvest period, so that you get good summer growth (which leads to more energy reserve for the next year). This is definitely going to be a trial-and-error plant for me.
post #33 of 56
:
i cant even imagine planting right now.
post #34 of 56
I'm in Zone 7b and due around May 20th, so I'm planning (hoping!) to get all the plants in and complete the processing of my spinach, peas and cukes before the Birth Day.

Then I should have a little pause before the July/August orgy of tomatoes and melons.

I am going to buy soaker hoses and mulch my paths and beds like mad, so hopefully the garden will be low-maintenance when I need it to be.
post #35 of 56
As a side note, I'm in Zone 4 (?) and rhubarb *is* a weed lol! I do mulch it over the winter with straw and/or leaves, it's unnecessary really, but then it rots in around the crowns and provides extra organic matter. It's also in a raised bed. I actually harvested the first year after I was given one crown and divided it (thinking it was okay). It does very very well, this past year was the 2nd year and I had to divide it already.

I would love to try some new varieties from seed eventually - I think it would look gorgeous in the flowerbeds actually.
post #36 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluebird9 View Post
That sounds awesome Erinz, I have more of a carrier than a sling/wrap and I'm hoping it has the same sort of effect on my daughter. What kind of sling do you have?

I used a MOby wrap the first time around and plan on using it again this time for the very new stage. I think a woven wrap will be good for after a few months old so I can wear the babe on my back but still have him securely wrapped up. The Ergo (or other structured carrier where the babe is in a full seated position, not dangling from their crotch like in a snuggli/bjorn) was great for 6 months plus on my back and in front. Once they start grabbing for everything it's REALLY nice to be able to put them on your back!
post #37 of 56

Rhubarb side note:

I planted mine several years ago from a division a friend gave me and it wasn't ever doing that great.... I read (here I think) that I should try dividing it again and BINGO! lots of rhubarb last summer. Not sure if that could be the case from seed already, but it would be worth looking at the base to see if it looks crowded out.
post #38 of 56
Thread Starter 
[QUOTE=Erinz;13047366]I read (here I think) that I should try dividing it again and BINGO! lots of rhubarb last summer. [QUOTE]

How big was it? or at least how many years old was it?

I just feel like mine are weak. They are probably just a different variety then I remember. I can remember being a kid and hiding in the rhubarb patch!

Mine are 3 years old I think, Do you think I should divide them?

should we have a rhubarb swap!
post #39 of 56
Fleur was born June 5th, heading towards the peak of cucumber season. I didn't stop doing anything, gardening-wise. The day after she was born I went out and weeded and picked some cukes...and I'm talking MAJOR weeding. I felt great after having her, though-tons of energy! A week after she was born we all went to a U-pick farm and picked strawberries! I just popped her in sling (I used a simple wrap made out of gauze material) and went about my work.
post #40 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Erinz View Post
My garden is my place of zen, so being out there was paramount to surviving difficult early breastfeeding and world-rocking in general. If the garden is your salvation, grow it! If it is just a chore, be minimal about it. That's my advice

I have to say watching my babe crawl around in the mud and dirt was fabulous. He loves his veggies and I credit much of that to the fact we plant, water, feed, and harvest together. I can't say enough good things about gardening with a kiddo. (I can also say that sometimes it is FRUSTRATING! )

ITA with this. When I didn't have anything to do in the garden, I'd just lay Fleur on a blanket in the sun and sit with her while the boys splashed around in their pool. Or when they were napping I would walk around the backyard, pick the runaway black raspberries and mulberries, and hold her in my arms

My boys are 3 and 2 now and last year they had a blast gardening and harvesting. We taught them how to water with the hose, how to pick things, and how to pull weeds. We harvested black raspberries on my parents' property, and there was nothing cuter than watching our 2yo wander through the brambles, picking the berries and eating them as he went-his whole face covered with purple!!!

In some ways this thread is making me miss our big old dreary house The place was really too awful to live in, but the yard was amazing and so was my garden. This summer will be spent ripping out sod and starting from scratch..not fun.
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