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June 2009 Homebirthing Tribe - Page 3

post #41 of 91
I look forward to reading through this thread!

This is my 2nd pregnancy, due June 1. The first was a planned hospital birth and unsurprisingly ended in a c-section, so I'll be shooting for an HBAC. I kept making excuses during the 1st not to have a home birth and I regret not looking into it more.

Since mine is not a homebirth friendly state at ALL, I'm mostly concerned about how to get baby #2 on my insurance without an almost immediate doctor's visit after the birth. My insurance and care providers are the same company, so it's hard to do things they don't notice. I wouldn't be opposed to visiting their offices the day after birth, but fear I'll be scolded for not immediately going to the hospital after the birth (like it's some sort of emergency...) or that they'll refuse to see me until I DO go to the hospital. I don't want to have to deal with CPS because of this state's idiotic views on birth.
post #42 of 91
I have been surprised at the differences in state policies. I'm so happy that it's a more "normal" thing here. I'm hoping that my insurance will end up covering everything, I'm kind of skeptical, but we live in a "medically under served" area so I think they should. Plus the difference in the experience is not worth it to me...for us we are lucky and our out of pocket expense is probably very similar, so it's a no brainier which way we go. You would think insurance would support it because it's WAY cheaper for them, and that's just considering the costs of a normal birth, without the added cost of our hospitals high cesarean and extra drug rates.
post #43 of 91
I am hoping for a homebirth; it may depend on the gender of the child. But then again it may not. I'm a carrier of hemophilia, which affects boys. I've given birth to one boy without knowing about the hemophilia, and there were no special things done and no complications. Now at least we would know what to look for, and get to the hospital if necessary for an infusion. But I could also be convinced that we should birth at a hospital if it's a boy. Or at least go there for observation after the birth. We'll see. I've done a lot of research, and if it's a boy I'll consult with the docs and see what they think.

I have the ultrasound to find out gender in a few weeks. And what I want is whoever is coming, boy or girl. I'd be grateful for a million more kids like my son, that's not an issue at all. I just want to be able to do the best thing for the baby, and if it's a boy I don't yet know what the best thing is. We'll see. I'll keep you guys updated; I'm glad to find a group I can update on this, who understand the reasons I would want a homebirth.

My midwives are great, and are willing to take it one step at a time with me -- plan for the birth I want, and then talk to docs after we find out the gender (I'll consult with the hematology specialists either way).

Thanks for reading!
post #44 of 91
I thought I wanted a HB this time, after a wonderful and easy birth at a birth center last time. I've had so many medical issues this time though (from IF and needing surgery to get pregnant, subchorionic hematoma and LOTS of bleeding for weeks, gall bladder surgery, etc). that I'm scared. The medical world has become my new normal, unfortunately. Part of me really wants the experience of home birth. The other part is just too scared (for no real tangible reason) and I'll likely use the birth center again. I have my first appt there next week, so we'll see. I still might call the midwife and discuss home birth. I'm just not there yet. And I wish I were.
post #45 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by ktmama View Post
I'm kind of sitting here twiddling my thumbs at 19 weeks. No testing, no ultrasound, and no worries either! Anyone else?
I did that with this pregnancy and it was actually alot of fun for me! I didn't hear the heartbeat until after I felt the baby moving so it was a moot point because obviously something that is thumping around is going to have a heartbeat. It felt so good to learn from my body what was going on without relying on paid professionals and their fancy gizmos.

We are getting an ultrasound next week so I feel it kind of cheapens the wonder and awe from finding out whats going on by listening to my body/baby. But alas, it will be nice to know that I'm right about having a girl. And if I'm wrong, then I'm happy to have another boy!

This is my first homebirth and I'm finding MDC a wonderful resource. From herbs to birth tubs and reading guides. I feel like now I'm just waiting to buy the materials that I'm planning to get and then wait for the baby! I have one question for you: did you purchase a birth kit with the chux pads? Do you think they're useful?
post #46 of 91
How did I miss this thread yesterday?! I'm in! We're planning a home birth for our first. We'll be renting a birth tub (our MWs have a few different ones) that is nice and deep and sturdy. Not sure where we're going to put it yet...
post #47 of 91
mbravebird, I know a woman who UC'd last year, and it turned out to be a boy with haemophilia. Of course, she's an OB RN and it's her second with haemophilia, so she really knew what she was doing. But just saying, it can be done, and the kid is fine.
post #48 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by wildnewmamma View Post
You would think insurance would support it because it's WAY cheaper for them, and that's just considering the costs of a normal birth, without the added cost of our hospitals high cesarean and extra drug rates.
This boggles my mind as well. My hospital birth last time was $25k and then an additional 4 or 5k for my son who was considered a separate patient once out of my body. Insurance paid 100% of it. All the prenatal appts, also covered 100% were in addition to that cost. My homebirth and all prenatal care plus the ultrasound at $200 will amount to $4400 which I will pay for completely out of pocket because my insurance won't cover a dime of it! Not a dime! I still have it for emergency use and for any lab work that may need to be done. It would cost insurance SO MUCH LESS if they would just cover home birth! Drives me NUTS!!!!!!
post #49 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlissfullyLoving View Post
Around here it is. You usually have to rent or buy your own tub. I think they want you to have it before the birth anyway, so you are not trying to set up a tub during a birth or have to wait until they arrive and set it up to use it. I know a few women that gave birth while their tub was being set up.
I live near Lizzy but use a different midwife and mine gives us one too. But we get it as 36 weeks and give it back after the birth. So I guess they must keep a lot on hand!
post #50 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by sunflwrmoonbeam View Post
mbravebird, I know a woman who UC'd last year, and it turned out to be a boy with haemophilia. Of course, she's an OB RN and it's her second with haemophilia, so she really knew what she was doing. But just saying, it can be done, and the kid is fine.
I know that same woman! She used to post on our email group for hemophilia. I read her whole birth story and emailed back and forth with her.

The main challenge would be catching a head bleed and getting the child a factor infusion in time. It's really hard to get a newborn's veins, so the infusion would need to happen in a hospital. But very few hemophilia vaginal births have head bleeds, around 3%. And I know the symptoms better than most docs, having experienced one. I'm also really good at getting veins, although I doubt I could get a newborn's.

From the research I've done, the half-hour drive to the hospital's NICU team for an infusion would not make a difference either way. The close observation, and watching for head bleed symptoms, is the most important part, according to the research I've read. But I need to be sure I'm not missing some research, or misunderstanding something. And my midwives need to be sure of that, too.

I tell you, though, it really cracked my world open, talking to your friend. Before I spoke with her, I probably would never have even considered a homebirth for a boy with hemophilia. Tell her I said hi...!
post #51 of 91
Erinz, I really don't think it's all a money issue. :: plops on gigantic feminist hat:: A lot of medical advice surrounding pregnancy and women's health in general is heavily misogynistic, and I believe that in a lot of ways it's an attempt to control the habits of women. For example, official US policy to treat all women between the ages of 10-60 as potentially pregnant (HHS came out with a ruling in, I believe, 2005, labeling all women of that age group as pre-pregnant and suggested adjustments to medical care in accordance with this. I've had some issues with doctors because of it).

Considering the history of birth in this country and the transition from midwifery to obstetric care, I really think there's a strong sexist element in the lack of acceptance for homebirth.
post #52 of 91
Are you sure that's the same woman? She (and I) live in central Illinois. If so, I'll be at her house tomorrow for the homebirth support group
post #53 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by sunflwrmoonbeam View Post
Are you sure that's the same woman? She (and I) live in central Illinois. If so, I'll be at her house tomorrow for the homebirth support group
If I remember correctly, she ended up calling a midwife friend partway through the UC? She has several kids, two of whom are twins? She knew intuitively all through her pregnancy that she was having another boy with hemophilia? She doesn't vax? I don't think I kept the emails with her name, so I just remember those kinds of things about her.
post #54 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by sunflwrmoonbeam View Post
Erinz, I really don't think it's all a money issue. :: plops on gigantic feminist hat:: A lot of medical advice surrounding pregnancy and women's health in general is heavily misogynistic, and I believe that in a lot of ways it's an attempt to control the habits of women. For example, official US policy to treat all women between the ages of 10-60 as potentially pregnant (HHS came out with a ruling in, I believe, 2005, labeling all women of that age group as pre-pregnant and suggested adjustments to medical care in accordance with this. I've had some issues with doctors because of it).

Considering the history of birth in this country and the transition from midwifery to obstetric care, I really think there's a strong sexist element in the lack of acceptance for homebirth.
You are full-on speaking my language!
post #55 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by sunflwrmoonbeam View Post
Are you sure that's the same woman? She (and I) live in central Illinois. If so, I'll be at her house tomorrow for the homebirth support group
Found her first name, at least! PM'd you...
post #56 of 91
Thread Starter 
Just wanted to address the medical issue a bit. I have two friends (one in CO, one in WI) who both conceived medically through IVF and both came to hb very late (34 weeks both) and both found good mw and had beautiful homebirths. Just saying not to rule out hb because your conception and pg have been medically managed. I think it's always good to consult a mw since their take on "medical" conditions can be very normalized and most of them do have experience with, say, resusitation.

I love this tribe!

I had my first "medical" intervention today - my one blood draw! This is the beauty of midwifery, IMO. I am very afraid of needles (past life, anyone?) and my m/w arranged for me to have my blood drawn by another m/w who used to be a paramedic rather than just dismissing my fears and ordering me to a clinic like any doctor would. :

BTW, just want to jump on that feminist bandwagon and add that it's not only birthing that's become so patriarchal, but breast health as well, IME. There is lots of bullying of women going on in the medical community these days.
post #57 of 91
Yeah, that's her. I didn't meet her until after her youngest was a few months old, but yup, that's her. Small world, and all.
post #58 of 91
ktmama, I totally agree. It seems to me that a mammogram is cruel and unusual punishment; I intend on never having one. If they want to visualize the insides of my boobs, they can do an ultrasound. NO SQUISH for me.

My pregnancy was highly monitored in the beginning. I have a history of early miscarriages, and honestly I needed the betas and ultrasounds for peace of mind. Heck, I rented a doppler for the same reasons, and I'm having the big u/s on Monday. It seems that, of the homebirthers, I'm more comfortable with monitoring and all of that; I just largely don't trust doctor's advice, the medical model of pregnancy, and I REALLY don't want to deal with their bullying at birth.

Case in point: I'm "obese" (few people would call me fat, but my BMI claims I'm obese) and I'm still below pre-prego weight. My OB has thus far not said a word about my weight, but I've been afraid to ask because of the stupidity about weight that exists these days. THe internet says either a) losing weight is BAD! or b) lose weight you fatty! My midwife says "you're growing just fine, and eating healthfully, and that's all that matters. Just make sure to eat plenty of protein." I wanted sane advice, and I had to go to a midwife for it.
post #59 of 91
Hi mamas, add me to the tribe : !

I'm 19 weeks too and I wish I could say I have just been twiddling my thumbs but it's been a bit more complicated than that here. My uterus became incarcerated so I had a surgical procedure to have my uterus repositioned. I've been in and out of the hospital but everything seems good now . The problem is confined the second trimester and does not effect the birth at all. So I should be able to start twiddling my thumbs now that I've made it this far.

This is my first homebirth. My first two were hospital births and my third was a planned homebirth but the baby died when I was five months along (due to an incarcerated uterus in that pregnancy as well). I'm really excited about the birth. I've been wanting this for so long!!!
post #60 of 91
I'm so here!! This will be baby #3 and my third homebirth. My first I had a wonderful midwife and the second was UP/UC and a waterbirth (he was my first surro baby!) I'm expecting another surro baby and we are planning a waterbirth with a mw who also happens to be a very close friend of the baby's parents so it makes really special for all of us. I can't imagine birthing any other way! So far this pregnancy (almost 20 weeks) I've seen her all of two times and I love it. She is really laid back and ok with the next to nothing "care" I want to have. We had an u/s a t 17w4d, but it was at one of those 3D places just to find out the gender. The baby's parents (IPs, in surro lingo) really didn't care about the anatomy/genetic screening-they just want to know if they can start buying pink or blue!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mama Khi View Post
I'm hoping to have a waterbirth or at least labor in water. The first MW in the practice that I talked to recommended buying just a regular backyard pool with a pump, so I was all set to do that. But then the MW I saw this week recommended renting a birthing pool. I'm not sure what to do now. Does anyone have any experiences with this?
My first birth I rented the Aqua Doula from my MW and never got to use. It's a pain in the butt to set up and takes a very long time to fill (thus why I never got to use it.) Plus it cost $190 to rent! It has really hard and high sides too-my current MW said she doesn't like them because she's short and usually ends up getting soaked! My second birth we had a blow up fishy pool (only like $25-which is good because we just threw it away afterwards!) It took about 15 minutes to blow up with an airpump. It was really soft and squishy-I was on my knees, leaning forward the whole time. My surro son's mom was leaning over the side and it held up just fine.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sunflwrmoonbeam View Post
"Also it irritates me that people assume that we're just following some kind of fad and aren't concerned about our child's safety."

This, a lot. I have a big mouth, and I really want homebirth to be seen as a fairly normal choice, so I talk about my plans regularly. Therefore, I get all sorts of fun statements like "But, what if something happens?" Uh, I go to the hospital. Duh! There are some people who seem to believe that I would refuse a c-section know matter what, and these are people who know that I'm generally well-informed, think things out thoroughly, and that I'm not insane.

Bah!
Yeah, two of my sister's have also had homebirths and I still got this question when I said we were planning a UC...um, duh, go to the hospital! It doesn't take a genius to figure that out.

I've also run into people who seem to believe that us crazy, hippy homebirthers (cuz you know we all have to be hippies to want a homebirth ) we're all about homebirth or nothing! Totally willing to sacrifice our child's life to get our homebirth no matter what! Ugh, do people really stop to think about things before they open their mouths?

I love talking about HB and UC so if you guys have questions, ask away! I can't wait to have another wonderful homebirth and bring a baby into this world in the most peaceful, gentle way possible!
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