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Korean dh resents the term "Chinese New Year"...... - Page 2

post #21 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by mags View Post
No kidding? I did not realize that this was such a popular belief among Koreans. I had a friend in college who was a Korean adoptee and he was gay, he was her best friend and I was half tempted to drag him over to mil's house to prove to her that gay Koreans exist. However, I know she would deny it and say that it was b/c the guy was not, Korean Korean, but was an adopted child and brought up by, "Americans." I have found that Koreans can be quite mean to those who are Korean by blood, but not Korean enough for their stds.
I knew this British couple that used to live in the North (the husband worked for the UN), and it's even worse there. I was told this anecdote several times - a colleague of his, who was very obviously gay, asked the young female interpreter if there were any gay people in North Korea. She replied something like "Of course, in the DPRK everyone is gay because of Dear Leader's kindness" I still don't know whether that actually happened but they also told me that the North Koreans believe homosexuality, as well as people being biracial, to be a "disease of capitalism" that the Americans brought to the South! :
post #22 of 35
Well, I guess it has to do with certain stereotypes they have of one another. My kmil is EXTREMELY prejudiced against anyone that is southeast asian. I am not sure why, she just acts like she thinks they are dirty and beneath her, you can tell she has no respect for SE asians. My parents (Taiwanese) were horrified when they heard I was dating a Korean guy. They said, "Koreans BEAT their wives!" What is so funny is that yes, I'm sure that in all societies some men beat their wives, but when my DH and his brother found out, they were rolling on the floor with tears in their eyes. They said that if anyone was going to be beating anyone in their family it would be their mom beating their dad. Seriously, my kmil, although a very small women is a very SCARY women. She is MEAN and just not a very nice person in general, even by Korean stds! My fil is a pussy cat and would could never even hurt a fly. Of course, my parents based that steretype on the fact that they knew one Korean couple IRL, and yes the husband WAS beating his wife.

Quote:
Originally Posted by christianmomof3 View Post
I never knew that it was an Asian thing. I also thought it was just a Chinese thing.

As far as your MIL thinking you were Thai, I had a friend who was Thai who married a Korean man years ago and she did not tell her mother that she had married a Korean man until she was pregnant with their second child because her mother was so prejudiced against Koreans and she thought her mother would disown her.

I am not sure what happened at first, but her mother came and visited several times for a few months at a time and loved her grandbabies and was civil to her son in law as far as I know and his parents were civil to her as well. I did not realize before that how much animosity there is between those countries.
post #23 of 35
Being half-Korean, I grew up always calling it "Korean New Year".
While I do think your DH might have overreacted I do understand his frustration. Koreans sometimes feel a little invisible. People almost always wonder if they are Chinese or Japanese, but rarely Korean.
post #24 of 35
As someone else mentioned, in China itself "Chinese New Year" is actually called "Spring Festival," or "chun jie" in Mandarin. Most Chinese people over here refer to it as Spring Festival when speaking English, as that's the term they've been taught. I think calling it "Chinese New Year" is mostly a Western thing. Is the Korean name similar? Maybe Spring Festival would be more inclusive.
post #25 of 35
In Hong Kong, when speaking English, people call it "Chinese New Year" or "Lunar New Year" or just "New Year".

I think calling it "chun jie" (Spring Festival) is a Putonghua/northern thing - I've never heard it called that in Cantonese, usually it will be "Sun Neen" (Xin Nian).

The New Year celebrated on January 1st is usually called "New Year" or "Western New Year".
post #26 of 35
In French it's called Nouvel An Chinois, too. I am glad I read this thread because I will be sure to call it Lunar New Year now. I can understand why the term Chinese New Year would grate on Koreans and other non-Chinese who celebrate it. So is the Chinese zodiac also not Chinese only? As in the year of the Ox, etc? If not, what would that be called? Thanks!
post #27 of 35
This is an interesting thread. I live in Japan where nobody celebrates the lunar new year or spring festival....

Will ask DH about it when he comes home.
Kathryn
post #28 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Needle in the Hay View Post
In French it's called Nouvel An Chinois, too. I am glad I read this thread because I will be sure to call it Lunar New Year now. I can understand why the term Chinese New Year would grate on Koreans and other non-Chinese who celebrate it. So is the Chinese zodiac also not Chinese only? As in the year of the Ox, etc? If not, what would that be called? Thanks!
Yes, those are used in Korea as well. I have heard it being referred to as the Asian zodiac before. It is a Buddhist thing, though.
post #29 of 35
Hee hee...we tried for the longest time to learn the Korean word for "homo-sexual". The teachers always told us they don't have a word for it because there are NO gays in Korea.
Quote:
Originally Posted by MittensKittens View Post
I knew this British couple that used to live in the North (the husband worked for the UN), and it's even worse there. I was told this anecdote several times - a colleague of his, who was very obviously gay, asked the young female interpreter if there were any gay people in North Korea. She replied something like "Of course, in the DPRK everyone is gay because of Dear Leader's kindness" I still don't know whether that actually happened but they also told me that the North Koreans believe homosexuality, as well as people being biracial, to be a "disease of capitalism" that the Americans brought to the South! :
post #30 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by mntnmom View Post
hee hee...we tried for the longest time to learn the korean word for "homo-sexual". The teachers always told us they don't have a word for it because there are no gays in korea.
:d
post #31 of 35
OP, I was unaware of that fact, so thank you for enlightening me.
post #32 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by LaffNowCryLater View Post
OP, I was unaware of that fact, so thank you for enlightening me.
:
post #33 of 35
We lived in China and frequently traveled all over Asia, where it was always called Spring Festival.
post #34 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by MittensKittens View Post
Yes, those are used in Korea as well. I have heard it being referred to as the Asian zodiac before. It is a Buddhist thing, though.
Honestly, I dont think people calling it Chinese New Year is that big a deal. Same goes with the zodiac. Though the lunar new year is celebrated by other Asian cultures(Korea,Vietnam,previously Japan), it is all because of very heavy Chinese influence in those countries. Its called Chinese New Year because it is Chinese in origin. The same concept applies to the zodiac, which is Chinese in origin but is used in multiple Asian countries. In my opinion, the "Chinese" in Chinese New Year is just to signify the origin of the holiday. I guess you could say that the same concept could apply to Chinese characters as well. The Japanese use them and the Koreans still kind of use them and you dont see people calling them Japanese or Korean characters. They call them Kanji and Hanja in their respective languages, which means Han Chinese characters. So, I think the same concept applies to Chinese New Year. I know that quite a bit of Koreans that I know and have met are very nationalistic and patriotic,so I could see why many Koreans would get upset over this.
post #35 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by galamazoo12 View Post
Honestly, I dont think people calling it Chinese New Year is that big a deal. Same goes with the zodiac. Though the lunar new year is celebrated by other Asian cultures(Korea,Vietnam,previously Japan), it is all because of very heavy Chinese influence in those countries. Its called Chinese New Year because it is Chinese in origin. The same concept applies to the zodiac, which is Chinese in origin but is used in multiple Asian countries. In my opinion, the "Chinese" in Chinese New Year is just to signify the origin of the holiday. I guess you could say that the same concept could apply to Chinese characters as well. The Japanese use them and the Koreans still kind of use them and you dont see people calling them Japanese or Korean characters. They call them Kanji and Hanja in their respective languages, which means Han Chinese characters. So, I think the same concept applies to Chinese New Year. I know that quite a bit of Koreans that I know and have met are very nationalistic and patriotic,so I could see why many Koreans would get upset over this.
So, it's similar to why we call the libra, vergo, etc zodiac the "Roman zodiac" instead of the "European zodiac." Since though it is used throughout Europe, it's origin is in ancient Rome.
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